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260 ft lbs on bolts - torque wrench or impact wrench?

The difference between 264ftlb and 250ftlb is just barely outside the +/-4% cal spec on a Proto 1/2". Use your 1/2" and bump twice.


Could also lube the threads and do some math.
 
The difference between 264ftlb and 250ftlb is just barely outside the +/-4% cal spec on a Proto 1/2". Use your 1/2" and bump twice.


Could also lube the threads and do some math.
Im with Cole on this one. Using a torque wrench at 250 lb ft will get you closer to the 264 target than all the other ideas.
 
Stick a cheater on, you still feel it click, I think my big 1” torque wrench was 600 ft/lbs I think 2500 Nm
I couldn’t click it without a 6 or 7 foot length of pipe.
Mark
Hi Bob, I dont know what torque wrench you are using but most click-types are, “hand hold position sensitive” and using an extension will yield a totally different output than one might think. I really hope the application worked for you but PM me if you want further explanation…I just want you to be safe!
 
Serafins guys were doing huge water pipes,for which their 50 IQs suited them......anyhoo ,they had to install a number of rubber gasketted valves ..........so they went to a induction session at Tyco (valve supplier) ,and went away with a huge torque wrench about 8 ft long to properly set the hundreds of bolts in the valves ...........un fortunately they didnt grasp how to use it ,all the gaskets blew out causing a grand canyon size washaway.............Iss the "talking wrench "iss no good ,cause it never say anything to the boys.
 
Eight feet up in the air? Put a swing on it and just sit down on the job.



Thanks for all the suggestions. I like the idea of standing on a breaker bar, but the leg on the right would prevent the bar from getting horizontal. I can do the math for the angle, but wonder of the other force component along the bar could cause problems?

I wouldn't ordinarily be so cautious, but with 1000+ lbs 8 feet up in the air, seems prudent.
 
Hi Bob, I dont know what torque wrench you are using but most click-types are, “hand hold position sensitive” and using an extension will yield a totally different output than one might think. I really hope the application worked for you but PM me if you want further explanation…I just want you to be safe!
No I got it covered thanks, it’s obvious you need to recalculate the torque from clockwise to anti-clockwise moments, or for the uninitiated T1=T2xL1/L2 , just like a simple beam calculation distancexload= distance x load about a point , it’s all irrelevant now, I don’t do any rolling mill adjustments and in any case the local druggies emptied my shop so torque wrenches and 1” drive ( snap on mind you) sockets were stolen, hell they even managed to take a lathe!, ok only a small myford but still.
I did buy a teng 3/8 bar a while back and a britool 1/2” for my lug nuts, digital , it just bleeps, mind the big bolts on the mill could have been 10% off either way without A problem, failure was unknown as the things were off the scale at FOS of 8-10 above required load.
Certainly not a thing to do on an aeroplane or bridge, we had hydraulic torque setters for critical components
Like pilgrim bolts ( 2000 bar hydraulic bolts)
But your correct it should be stated that the mechanical advantage ie length of the appliance must be taken into account, thank you
Mark
 
Since the pro mentioned you could get away with a "Cheap" torque wrench you might want to check out the unmentionable Freight store. They have inexpensive/cheap torque wrenches and torque multipliers. If you go their cheapest route, you can get away with less than a $100.00 investment. They have quite a few wrenches and multipliers that might be the route to go. Personally, I wouldn't take the chance on jumping on or adding an extension to any quality torque wrench.

I have several Snap On torque wrenches, and at nearly $500.00 a copy I'm not going to abuse them.
 
Don’t need big ones anymore, thankfully, just one for lug nuts and a little one for odds and sods.
I paid 1400 pounds for the 1” one!
Mark
 
It can get excessive, then you go up the angular torque alley, ever tried tightening a 4” bolt , it’s an ask .
Closest I’m going to get is the nut on a hydraulic cylinder rod waiting, I really need a press to get a grip, I know I’m going to be cursing getting that thing unscrewed.
I did fang up by getting a used strech bolt in the mix, and it broke, no suprise except mine, dumbass ( me)
Mark
 
Just follow the maintenance department guidelines. 3' breaker bar, with a 3' cheater pipe, along with red lock tight, and it'll be good to go.
 
It can get excessive, then you go up the angular torque alley, ever tried tightening a 4” bolt , it’s an ask .
We do Hy-Torc until ~2-1/2" studs and after that or in certain apps (like large elec motors and compressors) we move to super nuts. Time consuming little suckers, they are.
 
It can get excessive, then you go up the angular torque alley, ever tried tightening a 4” bolt , it’s an ask .
Closest I’m going to get is the nut on a hydraulic cylinder rod waiting, I really need a press to get a grip, I know I’m going to be cursing getting that thing unscrewed.
I did fang up by getting a used strech bolt in the mix, and it broke, no suprise except mine, dumbass ( me)
Mark
I just did my first two hydraulic cylinders. The first one took 5 hours to get the gland nut off. I tried a variety of tools with longer and longer cheater bars. Finally I tried a homemade pin spanner with a 5' cheater but it kept failing as it always wanted to torque out. Eventually I tack welded the pin spanner tool to to the nut and got that sucker off. On the second one I went directly to tack welding the pin spanner and got it off in ten minutes.
 
Engineers at our company specified snug up plus so many degrees rotation to achieve desired torque on certain critical fasteners. I don't know if it was calculated or found through experimentation. People who apply lube to threads routinely increase torque by 1/3. Anyway not an exact torque but a range may be ok. I have checked the torque on my cars lug nuts put on by a tire shop by using a torque wrench to back them off. Ticked me off when I needed 250 ft lbs to remove them when the spec is 85 ft lbs.
 
Horrible fright balck friday sale through Monday has a corded electric impact 1/2 gun for $59.99. Claims 14050 foot pounds. Get a torque stick to match. Batteries will never be flat.
Their torque stick set is $60.
Bill D
 
I'd just use a cordless impact. It's hard to imagine that thing being engineered to such high standards that being a few ft lbs off will cause it to fail.

Do the instructions mention if the bolts should be dry or greased? If not, then their torque values can't even be that accurate anyway.
 
The answers in this thread are all centered around torqueing these bolts to how ever may foot pounds.
All this talk is really overkill and off the map.
Take a minute to look at the application.
These multiple bolts are on the mechanical disadvantage
side of the lever. Weight on the forklift is multiplied in the
outrigger structure, and creates an almost pure tension
vector in these bolts. The torque spec is used to ensure
the static tension in these bolts will always be high than the dynamic tension they will see in their application.
Just like con rod bolts in an engine. But think for a minute
what would happen if these bolts were not as tight and
don't have enough tension to be over the dynamic
tensile loads imposed upon them. Will they fail? Will they break? The answer is no. What will happen of they are used and they are not tight enough? Well, they will take the load, and elastically deform, and the bolted joint connection will relax some of it's compressive
holding strength. Will the joint open or show a gap?
No. What will happen then? Well the bolts, instead remaining in a static loaded condition, will experience dynamic cyclical loading. But all the the elastic range. There will be no plastic permanent deformation, which
is good. So what is the problem? I suspect the torque
specification is designed to prevent fatigue. Fatigue is loading and unloading of the force in the elastic range,
and still experiencing a failure. But the reality in this
fork lift application, is the bolts will likely never see
the amount of cycles needed to fatigue a bolt. And
there is a curve to this torque to remain over the
maximum experienced tension condition, and how
close the tension was applied to being near this ideal
value, makes the dynamic variation less and less.
So to say, if you get them tight close to the recommended value, the less fatigue they will
experience. And since the likelihood of having
enough cycles to allow fatigue to even happen
is low, getting these bolts close to the recommended
value, even if you do not achieve the exact
desired torque, has a very small probability of
EVER causing a failure. If tight is not tight enough,
you will likely see fretting corrosion before any
catastrophic failure. So that is an indicator.
So to sum this up, it is not a doomsday event
if you can't get these bolts exactly tight enough.
You are worrying to much. But you can't know
what you don't know, so maybe my words can
help you here, put things into perspective.


-Doozer
 
That's one of the reasons i don't have tire work done at Walmart anymore.
No one is perfect, but Discount Tire ONLY does tires and does a good job with them. They set their guns low and finish the wheels off with a torque wrench...you can see the wrench wrenching and not just clicking right away as if the guns over-tightened. They will rotate your tires for free as well as plug and patch holes if not in the sidewall. They do this even if you did not get your tires from there.
 








 
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