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45° with radius does not work

And if you think that's going to work, that simply implies that you know less about programming than you give programmers credit for knowing about machining. G50 is associated with the X/Z coordinates to set a Work Coordinate System, while G54/G59, if combined with X/Z addresses in a Block, specifies the Work Coordinate System Offsets being used and the target coordinates of that Block. Simply replacing G50 with a G54/G59 code isn't going to work.
Plagiarism is the highest form of flattery.
 
G50 is for constant surface speed, we're both wrong, at least I can admit it. my point, that you clearly missed, is that the odd g code and M codes can be replaced easily from machine to machine. perhaps you were thinking of g10?
You're just digging a deeper hole for yourself.

No, we're not both wrong, only you. G50 associated with an "S" code limits the maximum Spindle Speed when the control is in Constant Surface Speed Mode (G96). G50 when combined with X/Z coordinates, as I stated in my earlier Post, sets the Work Coordinate System.

For early machines, those machines that you're suggesting dumbing the programs for your later controls down to, that used G50 to set the Work Coordinate System for each tool, G10 wasn't even thought of at that time.

At least try and know something about what you submit on the Forum. Many newbies follow these Threads, and making comments in your authoritative manner, may have them believe what you're writing to be gospel.
 
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You're just digging a deeper hole for yourself.

No, we're not both wrong, only you. G50 associated with an "S" code limits the maximum Spindle Speed when the control is in Constant Surface Speed Mode (G96). G50 when combined with X/Z coordinates, as I stated in my earlier Post, sets the Work Coordinate System.

For early machines, those machines that you're suggesting dumbing the programs for your later controls down to, that used G50 to set the Work Coordinate System for each tool, G10 wasn't even thought of at that time.
well, I at least can admit when I'm wrong. do a quick google search of g50 fanuc code...


and yes g50 limits the max spindle speed, pardon me, its still got F all to do with work coordinates
 
…..G50 is for constant surface speed, we're both wrong, at least I can admit it……
There’s much more wrong you need to admit to. You’ve obviously not programmed a wide age range of controls if you don’t know that G50 for lathes was the only way to establish a work coordinate system. That was it, for decades.
 
There’s much more wrong you need to admit to. You’ve obviously not programmed a wide age range of controls if you don’t know that G50 for lathes was the only way to establish a work coordinate system. That was it, for decades.
prove it, cause I already admitted my mistake, and provided what g50 is, if some ancient machines used it as a coordinate system I'm all ears. (er eyes?)
 
and yes g50 limits the max spindle speed, pardon me, its still got F all to do with work coordinates
Keep digging that hole. Further to Kevin's Post, early controls used G50, or G92 to set the Workpiece Coordinate System, and even to this day, G50 is available with current controls to set the Work Shift Coordinate System.

prove it, cause I already admitted my mistake, and provided what g50 is, if some ancient machines used it as a coordinate system I'm all ears. (er eyes?)
Following is a screen shot of a page from a Fanuc Manual for a current model control. According, not only ancient controls can use G50 to set the Coordinate System, but current machines as well.

G50.JPG

With most, except for the early Fanuc Controls, there are 3 different G Code Systems available via parameter setting, Type A, B and C. Type A uses G50, while Type B and C use G92 to set the Coordinate System, and to limit the maximum Spindle Revs when in G96 Mode.

Kevin, AKA Vancbiker, has forgotten more about NC and CNC programming than I suspect you know.
 
Keep digging that hole. Further to Kevin's Post, early controls used G50, or G92 to set the Workpiece Coordinate System, and even to this day, G50 is available with current controls to set the Work Shift Coordinate System.


Following is a screen shot of a page from a Fanuc Manual for a current model control. According, not only ancient controls can use G50 to set the Coordinate System, but current machines as well.

View attachment 432812

With most, except for the early Fanuc Controls, there are 3 different G Code Systems available via parameter setting, Type A, B and C. Type A uses G50, while Type B and C use G92 to set the Coordinate System, and to limit the maximum Spindle Revs when in G96 Mode.

Kevin, AKA Vancbiker, has forgotten more about NC and CNC programming than I suspect you know.
thank you, I've never seen g50 in this aspect.
 
G92 was for mills. Lathes used G50. Again showing some lack of knowledge.

Something about your attitude makes me suspect that I started CNC programming before you were even conceived.
or maybe I've had my fill of arrogant "programmers"? (thats not a dig at anyone here per se) though Maybe its not MY attitude that is the issue?
 
G50 is still used to set the coordinate system on some Swiss lathes today. We even use 'em with fancy U,V,W, addresses, not just plain Jane X,Y,Z. :D
 
G50 is still used to set the coordinate system on some Swiss lathes today. We even use 'em with fancy U,V,W, addresses, not just plain Jane X,Y,Z. :D
purely out of curiosity, are they multi spindle, live tooling machines or like the absolute basic screw machine, and are they relatively modern manufacture, i.e. not sometime in the previous millennia.
And since I'm at least learning something new, UVW would be an incremental offset shift? Same as a g92, g10?

to be fair, I have limited experience with Swiss machines, other then doing my best to bail out night shift after day shift's "golden boy" programmer left them in a pickle. Otherwise I've managed to avoid them most of my career.
 
purely out of curiosity, are they multi spindle, live tooling machines or like the absolute basic screw machine, and are they relatively modern manufacture, i.e. not sometime in the previous millennia.
And since I'm at least learning something new, UVW would be an incremental offset shift? Same as a g92, g10?

to be fair, I have limited experience with Swiss machines, other then doing my best to bail out night shift after day shift's "golden boy" programmer left them in a pickle. Otherwise I've managed to avoid them most of my career.

These are the latest greatest, whiz bang Swiss lathes, like this:
XYZ, full C on main and sub. This machine has programmable B axis and ATC, we don't have those because we don't need 'em, but they use G50 too.

Though we've got no 32mm machines, there's plenty of 12, 16, and 20mm machines.

And yes, G50W would be an incremental shift, often used when rechucking with a Swiss lathe in following mode, otherwise your sub spindle would try to drive itself into your guide bushing while rechucking.

Swiss is my lifeblood, and I'm happy about it. No steel toes. No stinky coolant. No struggling to load a 15lb tool assembly into a spindle that's 30" from the operator door (I'm 5'3"). No heavy stock to load, no stoning the table and sweeping vises. 12ft bars of 1/4" steel are surprisingly manageable. I can drop 1000 of my pieces at once and not worry about breaking a toe.

I always tell other machinists anything they can do, we can do smaller.

#Swiss4Lyfe.
 








 
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