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A question for the lathe guys

They're already doing this with 6mm 50' rods all the way up to 1.36". It's a process that they've been doing for many years. They'd just like to expand to some sizes that are less popular.

After talking with them this morning, the material we use isn't as important as the surface finish. That unfortunately rules out cable.
How are the 6mm rods manufactured?
 
I agree with contacting a spring manufacturer to see if they can just squirt out a 50’ long piece straight. Logistics would be a fun challenge, but it sounds like you already know how to deal with that.

If that doesn’t work, maybe after screwing a bunch of 10’ pieces together you could weld the seams closed and grind them smooth? Good luck!
 
First thought would be to butt weld the lengths on a butt welder similar to welding bandsaw blades. Another thought is rotary friction welding but the long lengths would be difficult to wrestle.
With regard to shipping, I'm wondering how tight the 7/32" diameter could be coiled.
 
When in school I worked nights at a wire rope factory. The wire draw department could make that. Rail cars of large wire came in and were drawn down to sizes need. I wonder too how large a coil would be needed to ship it and not have to straighten it again.
 
When in school I worked nights at a wire rope factory. The wire draw department could make that. Rail cars of large wire came in and were drawn down to sizes need. I wonder too how large a coil would be needed to ship it and not have to straighten it again.
Really big. I worked on progression dies that stamped parts from 0.3mm tinned plate. The coil was probably more than 2 meters in diameter and we always had to run it through a straightener. Setup and ran a experimental cold coiler for Tenneco the spring wire was 13mm hardened and tempered wire. Coil was the width of a flat bed trailer and I needed to straighten it before coiling the spring. My guess is that you are just not going to get anything that is transportable if the coil is big enough to not require straightening. I reckon the best bet would be to charge the customer to build the straightener for the product that they require. Straighteners are pretty straight forward to build no pun intended.
 
Makes me wonder if there exists a formula for calculating minimum bend radius for a rod of given diameter and material. Perhaps a beam formula could be used?
 
Sounds like this is a mandrel for hose or tubing. If you can source 7/32" stainless wire that is coiled I think you could stretch it at the customers location. you only need 1127 lbs of tension to produce 30,000 psi of strain. Bolt two anchors to the concrete floor about 60' apart, use a hydraulic dent puller from harbor freight to apply the tension. Done.
 
Still would be interesting to see what minimum coil diameter is for given cross sections and yield strengths. Surely someone has done the calculations.
 
There are calculations out there, we are just too lazy to post them.
The basics of the calculations can be looked up in the Roark & Young book called "Calculations for Stress & Strain." Think that is the name. I'm too lazy to get up out of my recliner and go to my office and look it up. Some of the spring calculations for windup "clock spring" may work, too.
I'm sure a 7/32 dia wire will bend into a 8-foot circle easily without taking a set. But could be deadly if slipped out of your hands.
 
Mcfish,
In the sailing world, many sailboat rigs are made from nitronic 50 wire (before the move to carbon rigging). I know a forestay on a 35 ish foot sailboat would be in the 50’ range, that’s small by rigging standards. Maybe try and find a rigging company that does cold heading and they can point you to their supplier? Just a thought. I think SBI rigging was one near us, but might be a Denmark based company.
 
I’ve never used these guys, but 7/16 nitronic 50 is available, I’d guess it makes an 8’ coil but they’d know.


Navtec I think is the maker of the wire. Good luck
 
Mcfish,
In the sailing world, many sailboat rigs are made from nitronic 50 wire (before the move to carbon rigging). I know a forestay on a 35 ish foot sailboat would be in the 50’ range, that’s small by rigging standards. Maybe try and find a rigging company that does cold heading and they can point you to their supplier? Just a thought. I think SBI rigging was one near us, but might be a Denmark based company.


from the page

Rod is typically found in coil form up until a certain diameter and then it will be found in bar form but lengths are restricted to tractor trailer size…40′. Longer lengths available upon special request; anything is doable for money ;-0)
 

from the page

Rod is typically found in coil form up until a certain diameter and then it will be found in bar form but lengths are restricted to tractor trailer size…40′. Longer lengths available upon special request; anything is doable for money ;-0)
Right, but I think if I remember right, the 6mm or so size coils up to a reasonable size. It’s been some years since I’ve worked in that world, but it’s worth a look for the OP.
 








 
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