What's new
What's new

Advice on making a short joggle plate

EVC Jeeps

Plastic
Joined
Nov 25, 2023
Location
Los Angeles
Hi All,

I need to make this:
1713849930669.png

Or have it made.

It's 1/8" thick with a 1/8" lift and 1/4"holes. If flat, it would be 1".

It's 5" long.

Anybody know the exact name for this profile? You guys helped me identify this as a 'joggle' but I can't find much from that on the interWeb.

Or, does anybody want to make about 100 of them?

I'm using them to cinch down Tesla modules in a 1984 Jeep, CJ-7 EVC project.

Thanks,
Patrick
 
I am thinking forming die.
By the line on it, perhaps it was done on a press brake,
but men smarter than me might know how.

-Doozer
 
Using 1/8" material, make it wider, fold it over tightly on its self & drill your 2 1/4" holes & done? Just a project so you have full control of process used.
 
A press brake with a custom die set would duplicate the sample shown. It is a good process for high volume production. But the function could be duplicated by milling a recess on a 1" x 1/4" bar of aluminum or steel. No special tooling required, so it is a good process for low volume.

Larry

DSC03445.JPG
 
Last edited:
Thank you all for the replies but I think the press brake idea is the best.
Questions: Any recommendations for small run press brake companies that have adjustable joggle set of dies?

It's a Type 2 Joggle, here's a sample example I found:
1714096144752.png

Or, does anyone on this site want the work, I need about a 50 of them to start.

The original metal is brite galvanized but aluminum would work - right?

Stock size to start: 1" x 1/8" Thick.

Thanks
 
If it's a one-time thing, might be easier to get 2 pieces of sheet sheared (or just use 1/8" flat bar 1/2" width and cut pieces to length) and then weld them together in a lap joint, more or less. Offset the one part the thickness of the other and weld them up. It would look pretty much like a lap joint, but with ~zero overlap. Probably wouldn't need to be a continuous weld to minimize warping, but you could flip and weld the other side to counteract any warping that did occur. If it is an ongoing need, then this will be tedious and slow and not the way to do it...

1714100857297.png
 
Could probably build a simple die pretty quickly with some flat bar, make a top and bottom die, you could laser cut the blanks or cut from flat bar and drill the holes.
Use studs in the bottom die to keep your part from moving and just squish them in a press.
 
What material?

Aluminum?
Mild steel? Hot rolled? Cold rolled?
Brass?
Or some special alloy?

Mill finish OK?
Galvanized or painted?
Aluminum or what the original was: a bright galvanized steel. Mill finish TOTALY okay.

1/8" thick.

Here's a shot of what it's used for:
1714116892814.png

Thanks - Patrick
 
Could probably build a simple die pretty quickly with some flat bar, make a top and bottom die, you could laser cut the blanks or cut from flat bar and drill the holes.
Use studs in the bottom die to keep your part from moving and just squish them in a press.
I think it's probably going to be something exactly like what you describe.

Nothing left to do but, you know, all the things in your suggested plan of attack, yep, that.

I'll head over to my welder and maybe my waterjet guys tomorrow, see if they what to take a whack at it with their 20 TON brakes.

Ugah, nothing's easy....

Thanks!
 
Take a piece of angle iron and cut down one leg and drill your holes. Its really just a clamp.

If you do make a die make sure you angle the dies as in your illustration otherwise they will splay and you won't get a good result.
 
Take a piece of angle iron and cut down one leg and drill your holes. Its really just a clamp.

If you do make a die make sure you angle the dies as in your illustration otherwise they will splay and you won't get a good result.
That's an interesting alternative, thanks, I'll consider that.
 
In the same vein as ??? you could get the same function by jb welding a 1/8” rod or square to a piece of 1/8” plate with a couple of holes drilled in it. Drill press, hack saw and file is all you need
 
  • Like
Reactions: ???
In the same vein as ??? you could get the same function by jb welding a 1/8” rod or square to a piece of 1/8” plate with a couple of holes drilled in it. Drill press, hack saw and file is all you need
I mean I get what you're saying and all but no, that's more work, more parts, more cutting.

Nope, I think I just need to locate a brake press person / company that has a joggle set of dies like the ones made by Rolla V - here's a youtube link to their set up:
.

Any thoughts in that direction would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 
Send them an email asking if they have supplied anyone local and send them the work.
 
You don't need a joggle at all.

Make the part with a single bend down the middle. Done.

If the joggle is required to help locate the edge of the battery modules have the blanks laser cut with a tab you form down with a second hit.
 
I don't know why you're so wrapped around the axle about the construction method of these retention clips. The only reason they look like that is because someone had to get them down to $1.27 each, deburred and zinc plated. You won't save a dime getting them made like that in a quantity of fifty. Fifty-thousand? Maybe.

The function the part is accomplishing is a toe-clamp. It's not even a very good toe clamp. Under screw tension, the whole thing is just going to want to bend out of the way.

1 x 3/8 nunum extrusion, cut to length, two holes, 1-2 passes with an end mill. Ditch the stud plate and run the screws through the existing angle extrusion without it. You'd have 50 of these before you'll find anyone willing to break their fingers on a press brake.toe clamp.jpg
 
1 x 3/8 nunum extrusion, cut to length, two holes, 1-2 passes with an end mill. Ditch the stud plate and run the screws through the existing angle extrusion without it. You'd have 50 of these before you'll find anyone willing to break their fingers on a press brake.View attachment 437547
Diameter of holes? Width of dado? Tolerances?

C'mon, Donkey - I get better drawings than this from my freshmen! Who is checking these?

Oh... I see
 
I don't know why you're so wrapped around the axle about the construction method of these retention clips. The only reason they look like that is because someone had to get them down to $1.27 each, deburred and zinc plated. You won't save a dime getting them made like that in a quantity of fifty. Fifty-thousand? Maybe.

The function the part is accomplishing is a toe-clamp. It's not even a very good toe clamp. Under screw tension, the whole thing is just going to want to bend out of the way.

1 x 3/8 nunum extrusion, cut to length, two holes, 1-2 passes with an end mill. Ditch the stud plate and run the screws through the existing angle extrusion without it. You'd have 50 of these before you'll find anyone willing to break their fingers on a press brake.View attachment 437547
The site is finally back up - I've been trying to reply for two days!!

Love most of this idea, a lot.

Can't ditch the Stud Plate because of the assembly process, I've forced to stack the three Teala modules one at a time with limited end of battery box room, this makes it almost impossible to put a nut on the inner hole without it being attached to the other stud by that plate. I can send pictures of it if you like.

What is a '1 x 3/8 nunum extrusion' - I mean I get the dimensions but can't find or figure out what 'nunum' means 0 paint me stupid if it's an abbreviation for something.

Also, I'm not sure the original configuration did anything for the alignment of the module. It doesn't look like it.

Thanks and can't wait to know where what the fug a nunum is.

- Patrick
 








 
Back
Top