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Air compressor recommendations for home shop

I'm not sure this was mentioned, but most industrial pumps need to have a long enough on cycle to warm up thus drying the moisture created in the head and valve chambers. Not doing this will lead to rust causing the valves to leak. My 325 Quincy I have in the shop is set to start at 135 psi and stop at 175. On an 80 gallon tank plus some lines, this takes a few minutes. The nice thing about this is is doesn't have to start very often especially if you only using a blow gun or other small jobs.
 
Found this old compressor with a central pneumatic pump. Looks like the color of the tank underneath all the dirt is a light green so not sure if it's a speedair. If you zoom in you can see a outline of a decal on the tank wasn't sure if any of you guys are familiar with this compressor. From what I understand the central pneumatic pumps are supposed to be good. Looks super old though lolScreenshot_20231106_192747_Facebook.jpg
 
I personally would go for the Quincy you mentioned earlier rather than this one. Even if they're giving it away...
'Central Pneumatics' sounds like a harbor freight brand, and looking at that photo, that one has lived in a filthy environment and been cobbled about some.
 
You could do as I did.
Buy a home in an industrial part of town and get to know the owner of the high tec foundry right behind your house real well.
Maybe he'll tell his maintenance guys to run an air tap out the factory wall right behind your garage and let you hook up to his 75 hp screw type air compressor that runs 24/7/365.
 
I personally would go for the Quincy you mentioned earlier rather than this one. Even if they're giving it away...
'Central Pneumatics' sounds like a harbor freight brand, and looking at that photo, that one has lived in a filthy environment and been cobbled about some.
You are correct, I was thinking Chicago pneumatics as those are supposed to be quality pumps. Oh well on to the next one
 
For the longest time at home I used an old 1932 Kellogg. It was fine, but didn't really put out as much air as I needed. One day when I was draining it I noticed the water looked pretty rusty. I started looking into air tank failures and got scared about using an old used tank and decided I would just get a new one. Wasn't worth the cost savings to me to risk a used one that might have a questionable tank (not to mention a pump that may not have been maintained).

I ended up getting a Quincy Q13160VQ 3.5HP 60 gallon single stage. It puts out 13 CFM at 100PSI, which is plenty for everything I ever need at home. It keeps up just fine with my SATA HVLP gun and any of the other air tools I use. It certainly is loud though. Its only got a 50% duty cycle, but for a home shop that should be just fine. I've had it for almost 10 years now and have been very happy with it.
 
For the longest time at home I used an old 1932 Kellogg. It was fine, but didn't really put out as much air as I needed. One day when I was draining it I noticed the water looked pretty rusty. I started looking into air tank failures and got scared about using an old used tank and decided I would just get a new one. Wasn't worth the cost savings to me to risk a used one that might have a questionable tank (not to mention a pump that may not have been maintained).

I ended up getting a Quincy Q13160VQ 3.5HP 60 gallon single stage. It puts out 13 CFM at 100PSI, which is plenty for everything I ever need at home. It keeps up just fine with my SATA HVLP gun and any of the other air tools I use. It certainly is loud though. Its only got a 50% duty cycle, but for a home shop that should be just fine. I've had it for almost 10 years now and have been very happy with it.
It's looking like I may have to go this route as well. The used market is just not that great around me and when I do find a decent used one nobody ever responds when I message them. Either that or they are asking way too much money for a 20-year-old compressor. Just wish I could find a decent new compressor that isn't loud but I guess that's not possible in my price range
 
Part of selecting a compressor is determining the pressure and volume you’re going to need to adequately accomplish the tasks you normally use it for.

I replaced a single stage compressor only able to put out 110 psi when we purchased a different motorhome and trailer several years ago. The new vehicles need tire pressures up to 110 psi depending on the load they are carrying.

The old compressor just wasn’t up for the task. It could barely put out enough to get the tires to 90 psi. Once the pressure in the tire is within 10 psi of what’s available in the tank it takes forever to reach the intended goal. I had to bleed down tank to the start pressure and let go to full pressure several times before it could fully fill the tires.
 
So if you guys were to buy a new compressor 60-80 gallon preferably a stage 2 single phase for under $2,000, which one would it be?
 
So if you guys were to buy a new compressor 60-80 gallon preferably a stage 2 single phase for under $2,000, which one would it be?
I just said a Quincy Q13160VQ.

The cheapest two stages by reputable manufactures are right at $2k, while that Quincy is only $1300. Do you really want to pay 50% more for a two stage that don't make significantly more air? In a real shop where its going to be running all the time, maybe. Even then though I wouldn't be looking at the bottom of the barrel two stages anyway. Regardless for a home shop I don't see paying that much more for two stage.
 
You could also take a look at Eaton Polar Air compressors. I use the 7.5 HP unit and works well. May be slightly out of your price range, but they have oversized heads on them and turn at lower RPMs like you requested in the original post. Its the only compressor I have had so I can't speak to how it compares to other units, but it may be worth looking in to. They are right around $2k
 
Check public surplus for local used options. I got a 5 hp 80 gallon compressor for $200 after fees that only needed a new line between the pump and tank.
 
I recently replaced a 10 yr/old Quincy 3.5hp 60 gal with an Emax 7.5hp 2 stage 80 gal silent air model. I added a blast cabinet which kicked up my cfm requirements and my old one was struggling to keep up with longer cutting sequences on the plasma table.

The Emax is at least built in the states with "local and global parts". The best part is how quiet it runs! Every time the Quincy kicked on it was so loud I wanted to shoot myself in the face. The Emax is a little more than your 2k budget, but the noise reduction is worth the extra expense IMOP.
 
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This thread reminds me of the folks that say they want a nice small lathe or a Bridgeport or VMC, but can never find any deals on them so "those deals don't exist".

If you aren't good at finding deals on stuff you just aren't. You have to very, very quickly research and absorb a lot of information about whatever subject your potential purchase falls under. You need the ability to narrow down exactly what examples were made that will fit your needs and which ones won't. Then you have to actually be good at seeking this stuff out- Searching craigslist, marketplace and auctions. Effectively!

All the info is in this thread already. Everything you ever wanted to know about what compressors are good and what are not is on the first page. It's a pretty simple subject. Not a whole lot of ins and outs to it really.

IMO, if after 5 pages of good advice you post up pictures of a rotten compressor with a Harbor Freight pump scabbed onto it hoping for verification you've hit the air compressor jackpot, you should accept that your destiny is likely a new compressor from whatever big box store is close by.

Not everyone is a truffle pig for deals.

Go buy a new compressor. I recommend whatever is cheapest and will do the work you need because they're all cheap China shit.
 
I would concur with the fact that you have to know the going price of the item you’re looking for, be prepared to pay the price, and act quickly

A couple weeks ago I happened on a saw that I’ve been considering for the shop for quite some time. It is in like new condition but the asking price was a bit higher than I was expecting. I knew if I hesitated the saw would be gone and in all probability I’d never find another in as good a shape.

I bit the bullet and decided to go for it. I made an offer that was considerably less than the asking price, and much to my surprise it was accepted. Had I pondered the deal for even a day I’m sure I would have missed out.

In this case the dealer got the saw on a Tuesday. I originally looked at it on Thursday, and made the deal. It was delivered (no charge) on Saturday.
 
If I were going for a recip I'd get an older one and do whatever is necessary to get it tip-top. I'm not a fan of the new stuff either. Lots of horror stories. I'm running a 5 HP Ingersoll 2-stage in my garage that I bought new in 2001 and even that one was new enough that it had a shite motor on it from new. I'm sitting on a 47 CFM 3 cylinder pump that I will reduce down in speed so it's nice and quiet and put on top of a tank eventually.
 
Well ironically the guy with the stage 2 Quincy 60 gallon I posted earlier got back to me today. Got him to come down in price so figured I will get this compressor to tie me over until I can find a good deal on a better compressor. I should be able to recoup my money when I go to sell it . I'm just tired of not having a compressor and need something for the time being. Thanks to all for all the great advice! Is there any tips on plumbing in these compressors? I know not to use PVC and was planning on putting in a drip leg on the outgoing line. Any other things to consider?
 
You can always use a smaller drive pulley and slow that Quincy down to reduce noise if you don't need the full CFM. You'll want to research the minimum speed for that pump.
As for tips. . .

1- Slope all your permanent lines, low point at the end, then put a drop & dump valve there. If you use copper it makes a great condenser.
2- Use vibration isolators to mount the compressor, and don't use any rigid tubes between the compressor and the wall.
3- Take the drain valve out of the bottom of the tank and use a tube to relocate it up where you can reach it standing up, and if possible rout the discharge outside.
 
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