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Anyone know of a saw with a large miter capacity?

Use a vertical bandsaw but do what the woodworkers do. After parts are cut to length (yours look to be 3-4 feet) put them on a sled that uses the grooves in the saw top to guide the sled. Make an adjustable angle fence for the sled and clamp the 4x4 post to the fence and run it thru. The sled will eliminate the waviness of the hand held method.
 
I am as cheap ass as they get. If I was doing this and manual was time effective, a vertical bandsaw is the way to go. If I needed it to be automatic, I think rough cut with whatever is fastest, then a swivel vise on a bridgeport with a power feed.

If the parts were longish, a heavy duty cart shimmed to the exact height of my bandsaw and or bridgeport would come into play.

For a horizontal bandsaw or cold saw the 20 inch number means such a big saw that cheap is unlikely, to the point I can spend a lot of labor before paying for that saw

I love my little delta radial arm saw, and I guess you could put an abrasive blade or something on it to do such a thing.
The previous poster who mentioned them neglected to specify why that brand. Delta and a few others pivot the arm at the center of the arm rather than at the post. This means you can cut these type of shallow angles where it would not be possible on a Sears. The only reason you would need larger than a 10 or 12 is the rail travel. Again, a manual operation but you could get a nice finish cut fairly quickly

IIRC The OP has "Paid employees" and is fighting a high cost of labor.

Hand feeding a 20' section of 4" sq. tubing is not productive usage of an employees time now eh ?

de-burring the already cut part while the machine cuts the next,
that is better use.
 
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Dunno if I didn't explain well in my first post or...

The vast majority of horizontal bandsaws (that I have seen) just have swivelling jaws on the vice to set a mitre.

How the hell does that work? Your stock is always in the same place. You can't just turn a 40' beam to make the cut.

Are we talking like hobby stuff here or big boy bandsaws?
 
IIRC The OP has "Paid employees" and is fighting a high cost of labor.

Hand feeding a 20' section of 4" sq. tubing is not productive usage of an employees time now eh ?

de-burring the already cut part while the machine cuts the next,
that is better use.

This is why the marvel #8 is one of the best options. Set the part at the angle and walk away from the saw. As long as the cut is 18" or less long, it is one shot.
A big do-all with power feed table would probably work just as well too.
 
This is why the marvel #8 is one of the best options. Set the part at the angle and walk away from the saw. As long as the cut is 18" or less long, it is one shot.
A big do-all with power feed table would probably work just as well too.

It's not if:
1. the OP can't afford it
2. The Op doesn't have the room they take up

FWIW I have driven a few of them, stood in front of them for hours.
 
I did a brief Google search and couldn't find anything, do you have a model number or even a picture of this?

Here are some pictures. I bought this used, I think from a PM member.

The device needs a better gib than I have, and is very heavy, so it doesn't get used as much as you would think. However, when we/I do use it, it works pretty nicely (have to hold it down a bit)

But you don't need to make anything this heavy, and you surely don't need the screw drive or the half nut.
pm post1.jpg

You can see part of the scale (the witness mark is hidden)
post2.jpg

All you really need to base something like this is a reference surface on the casting of the saw, on a doall they look like this (and they are placed kind of randomly around the table):
post3.JPG

I will someday build a lighter (and simpler) version of this - don't really use the threaded feed much, but the miter gauge that can be pushed straight is really nice.
 
I have seen videos of portable/ bandsaws used to trim ends of big beams. I have only seen it used for wood like in a shipyard. The saw is about a 14 inch saw somehow clamped to the work. then it can be pivoted in two axis to make the cut. Angled or curved or both at the same time.
Bill D.

YouTube
 
To anyone who's interested, I purchased a Marvel 8 Mark III saw and it was awesome, but no matter what we did, we could not keep the saw from wandering at the point of entry. I called a few tech support people from various companies, and they all agreed this was a difficult task for the saw to accomplish accurately, and the best advice I was given was to score the entry point with a cutting wheel. We tried this a couple times, and the time savings using this method vs just cutting all the angles with the cutting wheel was very little if anything at all.

Ended up selling the saw, and purchased a Kaltenbach 450H cold saw, uses a 450mm blade and can cut through 4" square tubing at about a 28 degree included angle all the way through. The saw miters a full 90 degrees both left and right, so even if we have a steeper cut, we can cut most of the way through the tube, then finish it off with a cutting wheel.

The Marvel I paid $14.5K, sold it for $16K (which ended being a slight loss after all other fees were accounted for), the Kaltenchbach I purchased for $19.5K. This saw has been amazing, and seems to do everything we need it to flawlessly and very quickly!
 
How the hell does that work? Your stock is always in the same place. You can't just turn a 40' beam to make the cut.

Are we talking like hobby stuff here or big boy bandsaws?

Didn't see this last time around...

Our big saw is a dual column design with a 600mm round bar capacity. Not huge, but pretty big. We also have a small hinge type saw that is about 200mm bar cap.

Both of those saws, the axis of the vice is fixed in the bed of the saw, the jaws swivel, and the whole saw rotates on a base on the floor.

The saws I was talking about in this thread are a different construction. The bed of the saw is completely stationary and the vice is built into it and does not swivel, and the bandsaw bow swivels around it.
 








 
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