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Bandsaw blades for really hard wood?

I want to resaw bloodwood, tasmanian myrtle, cocobola, African blackwood and similarly hard lumber saved in the loft over the years.

Does anyone have experience with some of the bimetal blades, irregular tooth pattern designed for metals such as Lenox trimaster,
https://bandsawoutlet.com/tri-master/ versa pro https://bandsawoutlet.com/versa-pro/ cast master https://bandsawoutlet.com/cast-master/
tri-tech https://bandsawoutlet.com/tri-tech-ct/ or masterCT https://bandsawoutlet.com/lenox-max-ct/ ?

Trying to avoid spending for carbide mostly due to expense for item i don't know how to spec. But willing to consider if anyone has exceptional reccomendations.

Saw has 30" wheels, 16'-6" band length, 3/4" width is probably ideal, can work with 1/2" through 1-1/4" 3 tooth, or 2/3 or 3/4 count.
Since what i want to resaw is mostly over 9" wide and up, stability in the cut and long sharpness life are paramount.
E.g., don't really need thickness under .035"; .042" is acceptable.

I already have 1/2" .025" bands that work well in soft woods like hard maple, beech, black locust, etc. :)
 
Trying to cross reference to blades I know. The tri tech would not be first choice. Very wide set which gives rough surface.
I do not cut enough wood to understand what wood blades should be other than really sharp.
The wide set blade produces rough finish and shorter blade life in steel. Dramatically less pinch if that is main concern. Cutting oak dunnage has finish of a dull axe with a 3/4 or 2/3 blade.

The tri master looks like a Morse non ferrous blade. Higher rake, lower set. I think that would be better direction.
 
Stephen, I've used 1/2" x .025 3tpi Lenox Tri-Master blades. Minimizing kerf was a major factor for me, needed to get absolute maximum yield, and I'd had good success with 1/2" .025 4tpi bi-metallic blades, so I stayed with 1/2". I got a very smooth cut, but was only cutting 6" max width material, and mostly 3". Kerf was about .060"

But I discovered I could get a much narrower kerf with a bi-metallic Lenox Diemaster II, 1/2" x .025" 4 tpi, by squeezing the teeth in my Kurt vise, got it down to .037". Had some resonance issues which I have ideas how to address, but even so I was able to get an extra set of guitar sides, plus sometimes an extra fingerboard blank from old boards of Brazilian rosewood. A $ignificant accomplishment! Going to pursue this after I get back to work in the new shop.
.
If you choose to go the bimetallics, I think you can get increased blade life by slowing down the bandsaw, I'm going to put a vfd on mine. Plus it could be useful in controlling resonance. I also found blade lubrication to be helpful - I used a Lenox Micronizer Jr, which I think is a mql sort of device. Sadly mine is all clogged up from disuse, will need to soak and clean it. I remember getting a smoother cut and longer blade life with it, and I'm hoping it might address the resonance problem with the reduced kerf blade.

Just my 2 cents, from a guy who is much more concerned with yield than speed.
 
The tri tech would not be first choice. Very wide set which gives rough surface.

This is exactly the type of info a person hopes to learn when sorting through options.
"rough cut" per se is not a deal killer if that promotes a stable, straight up and down cut.
However it suggests drawing more HP than a narrower kerf, sometimes a lot more. My saw only has 3HP and that can become a factor where you are only feeding fast enough to avoid bogging the saw, as opposed to optimizing band life by cutting more/rubbing less.

Richard - you and i have had the band speed discussion a number of times - i'm almost at the point of thinking about gutting the direct drive motor, and putting 5 or 7HP on with pulleys. You could not slow my stock motor much with a VFD, being only 3HP to start with. I'll be happy to entertain your offer to have some rosewood to practice on, of course. Or did i read that wrong? :)

smt
 
im running diemasterterII on my wood saw 6 tpi. cuts cocobolo no problem but wish the kerf was thinner. like alrerady posted i try to max out usable wood. as a knife maker i also cut a bunch of stabilized wood. had a carbide blade once and it worked well on composites but $ to run and over kill on wood. the biggest thing you will find cutting cocobolo is it can get "gummy" and smear on thhe sides of the blades or load some of the teeth making for cuts that drift. i just clean the blades now and then. most of the stock is under 2 inch thick but when i am cutting up splalted maple andn oak can be as much as 7 inch in the cut. any bigger then that and i have to use my roll in saw or get it pieced down with my chainsaw
 
A few years ago I cut a hard maple stump end up for a friend. Used my saw with die master bimetal blade. It was shot at the end. that was worse than cutting steel.
Probably due to a lot of silica in the stump.
Dave
 
Stephen,
I had a bunch of “auction find”bimetal blades cut to fit my small re-saw 16” wheel size machine. They are 3/4” width and only 121” in length but I can get 11 or 12” height for sawing. I found them to cut well and I have done a lot of cutting with different blades including carbide. For the longest time there were no carbide wood cutting blades less than 1” wide and now you can get a 3/4” width. ( I just read 1/2” wide as well) The carbide cuts the best and lasts the longest.

However I am quite happy with the bi-metal blades and these are vari pitch and I think they are 6-8 but will have to check as I am mostly working in the metal shop these days. I think most are Lennox brand.
The main issue for straight cuts over wide widths when re-sawing is in regards to blade tension. Equally important are the guides being set well and brought up to touch the blade when it is fully tensioned.
If you don’t have a blade tension meter then a digital caliper works well.
You can look up the procedure. I have hydraulic tensioning on both my wood saws and this is the best setup in my opinion. I can easily set any blade correctly and also adjust it if the pressure drops.

Some saws are just not capable of the correct tension given the less than adequate (or accurate) tensioning systems. On my general purpose saw I installed a cheap hand pump and a very good enerpac cylinder. The benefit of the cheap pump is the self releasing pressure system built into the cheapness. It slowly lets off the pressure after a half hour or so and that means I never have to remember to release the pressure, just walk away after cutting which is very convenient.
 
Hi Stephen,
I used to use a Suffolk Machinery 3/4" 3TPI bi-metal resaw blade that was advertised for hard exotics. I used it extensively when I was doing some work with padauk. It worked well and left a smooth finish up to 8-1/4" high on my 16" Walker Turner, but I was unhappy with the thicker .035 kerf compared to the regular Suffolk blades I use with .025 kerf. On my small saw the tooth hook seemed pretty aggressive.
I had some blade flutter initially, but at Suffolk's suggestion a lower tension actually worked better. Their blades seem to not like being overly tight.
The blade sharpness was holding up well until I foolishly kinked the blade. As it seemed to take months for the orange dust to stop coating everything in the shop, I was glad to be done with the padauk and never replaced the blade.
It looks like they've discontinued the 3/4" version and the 1" version has an even more aggressive tooth hook angle.
When (or if) I ever get my other 16" saw with 12" resaw set up, I'll consider trying the Lenox that Richard recommends.
Andrew
 
Flooring is occupying me again, (& ski season prep/pre-clinics :) )so it looks like i'm going to wait for a few sample bimetal blades from Richard once he gets settled into the new digs & can access band stock and welder. :)
I'll use that to process whether to step up in width, and/or move onto carbide.

Fearing ezduzit may be right. Current bands saw the stock fine - for about one or 2 leaves, and then the teeth are dull and start wandering. Gonna try bimetallics on the way, though.

Thanks all for information, & a nice set of options and informative sources to use while planning.

Thinks snow!
smt
 
This has been an interesting thread. I recently came into a reasonable sized plank of padauk. I think that I'll now be sawing it on the horizontal bandsaw with its lower speeds and bi-metal blades, rather than the woodspoiling bandsaw with its much higher blade speed. At least, for cuts that I can manage in that saw.
 
The carbide should last really well in abrasive woods. Some grades of Renshape kill carbon and hss blades pretty much immediately. I have bought carbide blades a couple of times and they have lasted months cutting ren and wood and believe they have been kinked or something both times before getting dull. Resawing that should not be an issue. I don't have one now because we're mostly cutting poplar and Baltic birch but if we have a bunch of abrasive material to cut I will buy one again.
 
I have re-sharpened HSS teeth on Suffolk blades.
The Dremel method is most annoying and mistakes are easy to make.
A small file for a chain saw chain is what I have used.
 
I have re-sharpened HSS teeth on Suffolk blades.
The Dremel method is most annoying and mistakes are easy to make.
A small file for a chain saw chain is what I have used.

I want to resaw bloodwood, tasmanian myrtle, cocobola, African blackwood and similarly hard lumber saved in the loft over the years.

Does anyone have experience with some of the bimetal blades, irregular tooth pattern designed for metals such as Lenox trimaster,
https://bandsawoutlet.com/tri-master/ versa pro https://bandsawoutlet.com/versa-pro/ cast master https://bandsawoutlet.com/cast-master/
tri-tech https://bandsawoutlet.com/tri-tech-ct/ or masterCT https://bandsawoutlet.com/lenox-max-ct/ ?

Trying to avoid spending for carbide mostly due to expense for item i don't know how to spec. But willing to consider if anyone has exceptional reccomendations.

Saw has 30" wheels, 16'-6" band length, 3/4" width is probably ideal, can work with 1/2" through 1-1/4" 3 tooth, or 2/3 or 3/4 count.
Since what i want to resaw is mostly over 9" wide and up, stability in the cut and long sharpness life are paramount.
E.g., don't really need thickness under .035"; .042" is acceptable.

I already have 1/2" .025" bands that work well in soft woods like hard maple, beech, black locust, etc. :)
stephen

Good question about blade choice. On another site, a very respected woodworker, Bill Thomas, gives his opinion on blade choice. He uses a 3/8” blade(3tpi) for most of his work with a three horse direct drive motor. I would add: don’t change out the direct drive motor. You didn’t mention the brand but usually 30” bandsaws are made by the large manufacturers: Oliver. Tannewitz, Yates and Northfield amongst others. The first three run 3hp direct drive motors. Oliver ran 3hp on their 30” saws for 75 years. Adding pulleys and a motor mount can be problematic, as anytime you make a major change, it may not run as well. I have a friend who has several 30” bandsaws and he likes the oldest best: 1925 Oliver but it’s all original.
Before considering replacing the motor, I would get a new blade and make sure it’s tensioned correctly. Run the saw and see if it fits your needs.

Let us know what decision you maje

JimIMG_4085.jpeg
 
Good question about blade choice.

If you read the original question, it is actually about tooth material choice.
As stated several times up-post, i have bands that work quite well on soft KD lumber like rock maple, beech, white oak, black locust, and even ebony.
However on the other woods mentioned which not only are much harder but have significant oil content & some appear to have silica (the Tasmanian myrtle, especially), the saw saws fine until the teeth dull - in only a couple leaves or sometimes only a few feet on a fresh band.

On another site
I am Ssonerai on that site, but have essentially decided this is my last time out. Keith runs the original safe space since well before a certain segment of society embraced that construct & i respect him for it. However, he is very sensitive to any sort of trigger language and i can't seem to avoid saying something, even innocent stuff in random posts that is not considered a trigger word.

a very respected woodworker, Bill Thomas, gives his opinion on blade choice.
Bill and i are brothers to different mothers even though we have the same surname. We have worked on projects together including scraping in that bandsaw of his so the tilt function would work (the casting had been broken, then welded with very poor alignment by a previous owner). We spent a couple very blue 15 - 18 hour days tag teaming each other applying the biax to the castings. We are also both the oldest brother, so that's a factor. :)

He uses a 3/8” blade(3tpi) for most of his work with a three horse direct drive motor.
I understand that perspective.. Also, i do miles more resawing on very wide boards. For instance, if you check on this or that site, i saw a lot of veneer, as well as bending laminations. The bands are not an issue - dull teeth are.

[/quote]Let us know what decision you maje[/quote]

I hope to!
& i do appreciate you commenting. :)

smt
 
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I want to resaw bloodwood, tasmanian myrtle, cocobola, African blackwood and similarly hard lumber saved in the loft over the years.

Does anyone have experience with some of the bimetal blades, irregular tooth pattern designed for metals such as Lenox trimaster,
https://bandsawoutlet.com/tri-master/ versa pro https://bandsawoutlet.com/versa-pro/ cast master https://bandsawoutlet.com/cast-master/
tri-tech https://bandsawoutlet.com/tri-tech-ct/ or masterCT https://bandsawoutlet.com/lenox-max-ct/ ?

Trying to avoid spending for carbide mostly due to expense for item i don't know how to spec. But willing to consider if anyone has exceptional reccomendations.

Saw has 30" wheels, 16'-6" band length, 3/4" width is probably ideal, can work with 1/2" through 1-1/4" 3 tooth, or 2/3 or 3/4 count.
Since what i want to resaw is mostly over 9" wide and up, stability in the cut and long sharpness life are paramount.
E.g., don't really need thickness under .035"; .042" is acceptable.

I already have 1/2" .025" bands that work well in soft woods like hard maple, beech, black locust, etc. :)


It is pricey, but you will thank me days later when you still have not changed the blade :)

If you can find a shop to resharpen them, they can be quite economical. Laguna may have recommendations.
 
dscipio - that looks promising!

Rons - i have a small file (ha, ha) drawer of diamond files. You must have found them effective on the teeth. Any tips on using them? Dry? with oil?

When i sharpen a band, i take it off the saw, put a dressed thin wheel on an open wheel pedestal grinder, and just walk the band around, one tooth at a time.
You can see by the residue, and by the tip sharpness condition how much to take off each. I'm usually pretty consistent with height, but the spacing becomes more, ahem "variable tooth style" over a few sharpenings.

Considering Dscipio's suggested blade, it will be necessary to build an automated sharpener, i suppose.
 








 
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