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Bandsaw guide blocks from solid carbide endmills

For the price is of coolblocks is it worth messing with
the Gide set up on the delta isn’t really a weak point
as long as you have everything adjusted right.

being too lazy to change the blade is the biggest source of trouble,
but that is the problem with all bandsaws
 
Why carbide? On a wood-cutting saw you’re going to be using either carbon steel or bi-metal blades, and HSS tool bits are plenty hard enough to serve as guides. You are not going to have them rub against the HSS teeth or your bi-metal blades, unless you don’t care about the blades.

I’ve used tool bits as guides in my Delta 14” wood/metal bandsaw for years. They are already ground to size to fit the guide supports, although you will have to grind the lower angled one from square. The guides last me for years, and it’s easy to reface them when they do wear. Just put small chamfers on the edges to avoid catching the weld or any imperfections in the blade, and set them snug less maybe the thickness of a piece of paper. You may need to put slight chamfers on the edges of the bits to allow them to slide in the holders.

I’ve used soft steel, lignum vitae, and the graphite-impregnated cool blocks as well. For scroll cutting with a very narrow blade, the wood or graphite-impregnated blocks work well - as you can bury the blade entirely in the blocks. For all else, it’s the HSS tool bits.
 
Why carbide? On a wood-cutting saw you’re going to be using either carbon steel or bi-metal blades, and HSS tool bits are plenty hard enough to serve as guides. You are not going to have them rub against the HSS teeth or your bi-metal blades, unless you don’t care about the blades.

I’ve used tool bits as guides in my Delta 14” wood/metal bandsaw for years. They are already ground to size to fit the guide supports, although you will have to grind the lower angled one from square. The guides last me for years, and it’s easy to reface them when they do wear. Just put small chamfers on the edges to avoid catching the weld or any imperfections in the blade, and set them snug less maybe the thickness of a piece of paper. You may need to put slight chamfers on the edges of the bits to allow them to slide in the holders.

I’ve used soft steel, lignum vitae, and the graphite-impregnated cool blocks as well. For scroll cutting with a very narrow blade, the wood or graphite-impregnated blocks work well - as you can bury the blade entirely in the blocks. For all else, it’s the HSS tool bits.

Likewise, my Delta runs just fine with tool bits as blade guides. It came to me from auction with no guides. I've been using it for several years (though not daily) since with tool bits as guides and haven't had to replace them yet. The saw is wood/metal, but I don't use it for wood so it always runs at low speed.
 
I think I have a piece of 1/2 bronze rod around. I think I will try using that. I have read of making the guides of hardwood and soaking them for a day or two in mineral oil.
Mineral oil because petroleum oil will cause problems on wood when it comes time to apply a finish.
BilL D
 
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being too lazy to change the blade is the biggest source of trouble,
but that is the problem with all bandsaws
Laziness can cause forcing a blade beyond it's minimum radius.
For the saw in question the stock blade plate is metal. So there is always an opportunity to saw into that.
I make these plastic plates out of scrap. There is also the Carter guides. Today I would make my own ball bearing guide system.
DSC_1559.JPG
 
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