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Bench vise with crack restoration question

Lewisarich

Plastic
Joined
May 30, 2022
I just picked up this bench vice and am looking for advice. It has a crack but I think it is repairable. Would like some advice on best way to repair. I am just starting to setup my own shop for fun and hobby work. I would like to have all restored or refurbished equipment. 89C94CBA-6C5B-4186-8B5D-B13193DA0D35.jpeg
 
Clean well, preheat, braze or silver solder, probably best to clamp it so the crack does not grow as you heat it.

You are correct, but have you purchased any brazing rod or acetylene lately?

My shop rate is $100/hr, but I bumped up brazing to $250/hr. It's insane how much that stuff costs today.
 
My dad had a gun table at a trade /swap show and his friend came up and said HeyBuck, I will give you all these vises for half what I paid for them.
What is wrong with them? My dad asks.
"I had a few past customers who said if you tighten them too much the whole front breaks off and 40 pounds smacks the floor."
A poor design something that could break one's foot belongs in the dumpster.

Could be the design is Ok and it had too many hammer whacks.
 
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You are correct, but have you purchased any brazing rod or acetylene lately?

My shop rate is $100/hr, but I bumped up brazing to $250/hr. It's insane how much that stuff costs today.
He did not ask about cost, or the economics of repair, so I did not give advice on those.

Empty oxy/acetylene bottles are by the door, hauling them in for exchange tomorrow, bracing myself for the shock....

My shop rate is the same, been debating when/how much to raise it.
 
You are correct, but have you purchased any brazing rod or acetylene lately?

My shop rate is $100/hr, but I bumped up brazing to $250/hr. It's insane how much that stuff costs today.
He did not ask about cost, or the economics of repair, so I did not give advice on those.

Empty oxy/acetylene bottles are by the door, hauling them in for exchange tomorrow, bracing myself for the shock....

My shop rate is the same, been debating when/how much to raise it.
Thank you both for the input. I am grateful for the information on the current costs of work out there and the input on how to fix the vise. I have needed a vise in my basement shop for a while and I like doing repairs and fixing things up even if it takes a while and learning as I go. It is going to be a lot about me fixing up and having it more than the straight economics of it.
 
It looks like lots of cracks. Try to drill a small hole at the end/beginning of each. Then go to town brazing. Go with one heat and get it all- if you miss spots just let them ride.
Might be a good use of ni rod too. Get the big stuff with ni rod then go in and flow the small cracks.
 
For sure that is hammer damage. Start by removing the paint and rust from the area and see if you're dealing with 1 crack or many.

The correct fix for that is brazing. The crack must be veed out with a carbide burr, then normal brazing applies. I don't think acetylene is mandatory. Try oxypropane.
 
As it’s essentially junk, stich it with a nickel arc rod, grind off, I wouldn’t worry about it myself, to braze your going to have to vee out, preheat, braze and slow cool, lot of effort really unless it’s a family heirloom.
Mark
 
Looks to me that there are cracks in both the movable jaw and the main casting. But you only mention one crack, so I’m guessing it’s the one in the jaw slide.

Live with it. The sides of the slide should handle the stresses. No more beating on it.
 
The crack seems to be restricted,and likely wont affect the use .......If mine ,Id bolt a 1/2 x 1 &1/.2 steel strip across the rearmost part ,which will act as a stop to excessive opening......as well as holding it together......any welding or brazing may deform the part so it jams in use.......bolt ,dont weld.
 
I think Garwood is spot on. You could spend hours of time and hundreds of dollars on fixing a vice that someone used improperly. Some vises, including my Yost, which looks like the pic below, have a built-in anvil. Some don't and when you hammer on the slide you weaken and damage the slide. It'll be a fine vise until it isn't. And even if you fixed it you'd have something that you could not be certain of. And brazing or welding the slide will leave a bead which will have to be machined flat (weakening the joint) or left proud, at which point the bead is the load-bearing surface... Oy.

Find a different old vice that's not broken and wasn't improperly used and damaged.

vise.png
 
We had the exact Yost vise at work pictured above.
Bought new and installed in engineering.
The sliding jaw had an honest 3/8" of side play.
I have seen 100 year old vises that were not as sloppy.
That Yost in a China import and a total piece of garbage.
We bought a $600 Wilton bullet vise for engineering and
tossed the Yost out back in the metal dumpster. Pure junk.

-Doozer
 
I just picked up this bench vice and am looking for advice. It has a crack but I think it is repairable. Would like some advice on best way to repair. I am just starting to setup my own shop for fun and hobby work. I would like to have all restored or refurbished equipment. View attachment 365744
Out of curiosity, is the vise made by Prentiss? They had real issues with cracks in this location. I have an uncracked one and it is considered unusual. I presume that it was a nit line casting issue.
 
A locally made cast steel plain vice is $600 +,so if its a domestic vice ,its worth saving .......and when clearing up my stuff ,a helper latched onto a repaired Wilton 5 "...... one off the front of a 1971 5 ton wrecker ......had to let him have it ,cause they were "helping" free ....not a lot of help either ...mainly "Ya cant scrap this".......well ,its got to either be moved or scrapped ......no option......and Im too old for hoarding.
 
I just picked up this bench vice and am looking for advice. It has a crack but I think it is repairable. Would like some advice on best way to repair. I am just starting to setup my own shop for fun and hobby work. I would like to have all restored or refurbished equipment. View attachment 365744
I broke a cast iron bench vise a couple days ago. It was one of my smaller vises. I think they're called light duty vices. The type with the slide (guide?) below the clamping screw. Where the guide meets the moving jaw cracked. I took a chisel and finished breaking it in half, beveled the pieces with a grinder, then welded it back together. It was very easy to do and I had my vise back to working condition in maybe 5 or 6 hours. I'll post some pictures in a minute.
 








 
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