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Brother tool stuck

CEnsor

Plastic
Joined
Jun 29, 2020
Machine: Tc-s2c-o

Had a crash. Material lifted out of the vise and jammed the face mill. After stopping the machine I called for a tool change to check on the tool and it broke the tool pocket casting!!!! Now the tool is stuck in the spindle. How do I get it out?!
 

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Sorry about your crash. Hard to tell in the pic but it does look like the tool holder pulled out enough and spun. Then the tool holder grooves did not line up with the spindle keys so the tool holder is held about a 1/4" out of the spindle. That is why the gripper broke. Probably just the fulcrum of the gripper which I think you can purchase separately. To get the tool holder out you need to jog the Z up to where the tool changes happen, about 3-4" above the regular Z home position. This will release the draw bar. you will need to hold the RLSE key, hit reset, continue holding the RLSE key, use handwheel or jog key to move Z up, pull on the tool holder if it doesn't fall out at the top of the Z positition. After tool holder is out. Jog Z back down into the regular machining area. Then do an M19 spindle orientation in MDI mode and check that the spindle keys are parallel to the Y axis within .002".
 
I finally got the told holder out. The pull stud broke and it won’t release. There’s some damage to the bottom of the spindle taper as well. Is my spindle trashed?
 

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When I broke a pull stud, I just did a tool change and when the head went up, the stud fell out.
That can be cleaned up on the spindle, can be ground in place to make it better but not perfect.
Also depends on how it sounds at speed and in cut. Ceramic balls can crack.
 
I did a tool change and the stud didn’t come out….
It might be mildly stuck, not like jammed in hard, just not able to fall out. Try to nudge it out with a screwdriver, gently.

But, your spindle looks badly scored, sorry :(. A regrind might be an option, but it looks like a lot of material will have to come off to make the big end clean.

Regards.

Mike
 
Drive dogs also look a bit beat up. Looking for a cry emoji. :cry: Last spindle episode dinged my spindle taper and some TLC with a few stones saved the day to within a tenth. Sheetmetal damage was very time consuming.
 
I spent some time this morning grinding the damage off the drive dogs and polishing the galling off the spindle taper. It was transfer from the tool holder. I got most of it off. I still can't get the pull stud out. It doesn't appear that the balls of the draw bar are retracting but it's hard to tell and I have to let go of the release button to look into the spindle...

Plus side... the spindle turns on and sounds fine all the way to 16k rpm.
 
MAybe take a side cover off, call a tool change to an empty pocket then when it is in the 'open' position turn the rapid to zero and see if you can blow some air in there to loosen it up
 
You do understand the RLSE button doesn't release the pull stud, it only allows you to jog the head all the way up in Z which is what releases the pull stud. I would avoid compressed air on the drawbar to avoid blowing the metal shavings into the spindle, but would rather use a small screwdriver or such to try and coax it out, or a magnet as a last resort as it may magnetize the ball cage.
 
You do understand the RLSE button doesn't release the pull stud, it only allows you to jog the head all the way up in Z which is what releases the pull stud. I would avoid compressed air on the drawbar to avoid blowing the metal shavings into the spindle, but would rather use a small screwdriver or such to try and coax it out, or a magnet as a last resort as it may magnetize the ball cage.
C'mon, you are going to fumble around on a ground surface with a screwdriver, but are concerned with metal chips.
WE are all grown ups here, I assume one would wipe out and inspect the taper

I assume what David Scott is saying is that the position of the Z axis releases the tool{ I don't know this, but it makes sense}
 
The Z axis postition releases the draw bar. When Z is up at the top, the lever that pushes down the clamp shaft (draw bar) contacts a cam. All mechanical. The drive keys in the spindle face must be oriented parallel to y axis. One key in front toward operator and one key at the back. If not, the release lever will not contact the draw bar release pin. When your spindle is at the top (tool change position) try reaching up with a pair of good needlenose pliers or sometimes a very strong magnet can work. pull the pull stud remnant out. Don't forget to check your spindle orientation.
 
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C'mon, you are going to fumble around on a ground surface with a screwdriver
I assume a little common sense that the person doing this isn't going to start prying and the taper is a lot harder than most screwdrivers. You just want to wiggle the pull stud head to make sure the balls are all loose and hopefully it will just drop out.

To the Op - When done you need to try bluing your taper with a tool, including with full drawbar tension to check contact.
 
Drive dogs are aligned with y within less than a thou. With them in this position, no matter where z is, the balls of the draw bar can be seen in the spindle and not retracted...
 
Drive dogs are aligned with y within less than a thou. With them in this position, no matter where z is, the balls of the draw bar can be seen in the spindle and not retracted...
You will be able to see the balls if a tool holder is not in the spindle regardless if the spindle is down in normal machining area or up in the tool change position. What's important is the position of the sleeve the balls are riding in. The sleeve is part of the clamp shaft/draw bar. When the spindle is down in the normal machining area the sleeve will be up in the bore it rides in. When the spindle is up in the tool change position, the sleeve will be protruding about .250" from where it was when the spindle was down. Easy to measure with the depth provision on your calipers. The bore is tapered (wider at the bottom) and that's what forces the balls to clamp the pull stud or release it. If your clamp shaft protrudes in tool change position as I described, you should be able to use needlenose to pull out the knob. Hope that helps...
 
That taper is pretty bad, and looks like a kiss grind wont be enough. The right thing to do is pull it apart, inspect drawbar and gripper assembly for damage and have the taper fixed correctly. Also have the drive dogs fixed while its out, confirm the shaft isnt bent, etc etc. If you leave the taper just "polished" you will likely damage your tool holders, and have significant runout issues. A test bar will confirm, but no chance I would put a good test bar in that taper...

And all this assumes you can get the broken stud out.
 
Pliers didn’t work even with the z axis in the tool change position. Would pushing up in the broke stud do any good? Any potential of damaging the machine putting a fair amount of pressure upwards? I’m thinking that if the balls are dug into the stud it may help to break them free with upwards pressure. The idea is to use a jack to push a rod upwards… dumb?
 








 
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