What's new
What's new

Car window regulator motor on a mill.

David916

Plastic
Joined
Jul 5, 2020
Haha I know, I know. I should use a servo or stepper motor because they are more precise. Thing is, I'm not converting my mill to cnc, well, for now at least. No one that I'm aware of makes a ball screw for a Jet JMD-15 so it looks like I will have to live with backlash for the time being. Wait, do I? I never thought to ask before now...

I came across a car window regulator motor, 3d printed an adapter to connect the motor to the mill lead screw and would like to control it with a DPDT (on, off, on switch, in my case, left, off, right) just so I can move the table without having to turn the hand wheel. I go to the gym one time a month and that's all the exercise I need, thank you very much. I would still have the right handle to do precision (hahaha) turns.

Problem is, this LED rocker switch comes with no instructions. The seller posted picture instructions in the listing but they are not correct. Hoping someone here has wired this up before and can share a bit of wisdom.

Listing:
 

Attachments

  • Screen Shot 2022-09-30 at 10.34.11 PM.png
    Screen Shot 2022-09-30 at 10.34.11 PM.png
    321.5 KB · Views: 20
  • 20220930_225949.jpg
    20220930_225949.jpg
    152.2 KB · Views: 20
  • 20220930_230054.jpg
    20220930_230054.jpg
    168.2 KB · Views: 20
Last edited:

APD

Stainless
Joined
Nov 5, 2005
Location
Hudson Valley, NY
You need a multi meter with continuity tester, or even a test light
Find out which set of contacts is switched in each position
motor leads will be installed backwards on one set of contacts for reverse motor operation
You might need two relays
Kinda skeptical about that switch being rated for 21 amps.
 

David916

Plastic
Joined
Jul 5, 2020
You need a multi meter with continuity tester, or even a test light
Find out which set of contacts is switched in each position
motor leads will be installed backwards on one set of contacts for reverse motor operation
You might need two relays
Kinda skeptical about that switch being rated for 21 amps.
Great advice, thank you.
Don't know why I didn't think of that?
 

Hardnox

Plastic
Joined
Sep 30, 2022
The poles are not connected to each other...rock to the right and the left terminals are on and vice versa.
now run a jumper connecting the opisite conners...choose one end of the switch to put your power to and come off the center to power your motor
 

magno_grail

Cast Iron
Joined
May 29, 2014
Location
ca, US
If that is actually a Contura switch it is made for switching high currents such as window motors. I have them for my Europa windows.
The second set of contacts labeled "Not Used" should be the second set of poles. Otherwise it would be a SPDT, not DPDT.
I used a pair of window motors like that on my Enco benchtop mill with a belt drive to the lead screw. If you do not have a clutch in the drive you will not be able to use the handle manually.
 

David916

Plastic
Joined
Jul 5, 2020
If that is actually a Contura switch it is made for switching high currents such as window motors. I have them for my Europa windows.
The second set of contacts labeled "Not Used" should be the second set of poles. Otherwise it would be a SPDT, not DPDT.
I used a pair of window motors like that on my Enco benchtop mill with a belt drive to the lead screw. If you do not have a clutch in the drive you will not be able to use the handle manually.
Wait, so would I need relays or would this switch allow me to change directions of the window motor all on its own?
 

Lewie

Cast Iron
Joined
Jun 7, 2018
Location
Albuquerque NM
What do you expect when you ask electronic questions of a bunch of mechanics?? :-) Let the electronic engineer/technician answer them. :-)
,,,Lewie... Retired RPE Electronics (not going to bother arguing with the "mechanics")
 

David916

Plastic
Joined
Jul 5, 2020
What do you expect when you ask electronic questions of a bunch of mechanics?? :-) Let the electronic engineer/technician answer them. :-)
,,,Lewie... Retired RPE Electronics (not going to bother arguing with the "mechanics")
Well Lewie, you never shared your answer. Can this switch be wired without relays and if so, how?
 

David916

Plastic
Joined
Jul 5, 2020
What do you expect when you ask electronic questions of a bunch of mechanics?? :-) Let the electronic engineer/technician answer them. :-)
,,,Lewie... Retired RPE Electronics (not going to bother arguing with the "mechanics")


Lewie is a narcissist and his comment offers zero value to this forum.
 

APD

Stainless
Joined
Nov 5, 2005
Location
Hudson Valley, NY
Wait, so would I need relays or would this switch allow me to change directions of the window motor all on its own?
It depends on how it is configured internally.
If both poles share a single common +12v terminal, it may short when you reverse direction.
The switch says its for turn signals, which would not need to reverse polarity.
If there are two independent sets of contacts (essentially two completely separate switches in one package) then you can reverse polarity on on side for reverse operation.
In either case, the switch will be taking the full current of the motor, which can cause problems if the motor draws alot of amps
Best way is a DPDT with relays.
Search google for wiring diagrams DPDT motor reverse. It would be difficult to explain without visuals
 

GregSY

Diamond
Joined
Jan 1, 2005
Location
Houston
I would expect a car window motor to not be able to last long....you'd be using it for a longer run time on a mill, most likely, than it is meant for. Plus the torques could be an issue. Then again it might work....my actual experience with this sort of half-assery is limited.
 

magno_grail

Cast Iron
Joined
May 29, 2014
Location
ca, US
The Denso window motors that I have draw 3/4 amp unloaded. How much they will draw moving a table depends upon the frictions.
To reverse a motor with a DPDT switch, the motor terminals go to the arm contacts (the centre of the three each side) and the power goes to the other four, reversed on each side of the centre contacts.
 

memphisjed

Stainless
Joined
Jan 21, 2019
Location
Memphis
wouldn’t the power supply be the current limit in this case?
A standard industrial machine switch will be able to handle the amps/watts of even a decent size dc power supply.
 

Comatose

Titanium
Joined
Feb 25, 2005
Location
Akron, OH
Why not just save yourself a lot of time and hassle and use a proper motor driver? Brushed, brushless, stepper, whatever. They're not that expensive, twenty to a couple hundred bucks depending on how fancy you go. You're going to want variable speed for sure.

With a window motor you'll need a clutch. A stepper or a planetary gear motor or a servo you could back driven
 

eKretz

Diamond; Mod Squad
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Location
Northwest Indiana, USA
Don't mind lewie. He says that almost every time something about electricity comes up. I'm sure he could give fine advice, but he never seems to bother.

It is interesting - given the nature of his posts on electrical subjects - that he has given advice about machining in the past though... And as I recall, mentioned teaching a little machining at some makerspace or something of that nature...

The thing to remember about message boards is that you could be getting advice from a fellow with 50 years of experience... Or you could be getting advice from a newb who doesn't know his ass from a hole in the ground. Or maybe even sometimes a guy who is intentionally trying to get you to do something stupid because he's a jerk.

You've got be able to use the message board as a tool, not a bible. Read the replies and the responses of others to those replies and make a judgment call. Or do some further googling about what you've read if you're not experienced enough to do that. Or if it seems like it won't hurt you, just pick something and go try it.

As far as not wanting to give advice due to someone possibly arguing over it: lewie, is this your first day on the internet? If you say the sky is blue someone may want to argue about it. In addition, it takes two to argue. You can simply say "I don't believe that's correct, and here's why," or you can just completely ignore the other party if you desire...

As regards the power window motor's suitability for power feed use, you might overload it if used in this manner. Check the rated current on the motor (google search the model # of the motor, hopefully you can find a data sheet) and rig up a quick test and see how much current it pulls during what you'd consider a roughing cut at a decent feed rate. If it's very near or over the rated current of the motor, it will probably burn out before too long.
 
Last edited:








 
Top