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Cincinatti #2 vertical milling machine

Has motor mount plate built as a big HINGE - that you can tap what ever holes you want in it. May have additional tapped holes already that happened in the past. See top line second item from left. (M-786-2 Parts and Service)

Two additional items sit on plate and mount motor

You'll find motor dimensions in such as Machinery's Handbook - or little pocket books such as Electrical Engineering Pocket Handbook
 

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Here is the drive clutch assy with its sheave. Motor "pulley" needs to turn this drive sheave at whatever speed it takes to run the mill in "speediest" speed to be 600 on spindle - if that is the placarded top speed.

Scan from M-786-2
 

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Sorry, been away all weekend. Will get data plate pictures when I get home tonight.

A 6500 machine would probably pick it.

The motor area is sufficiently cavernous that fitting any motor with a modern frame size should be a non issue. Yes, the max speeds are slow by modern standards. I don't recall what they are off the top of my head. One might consider a ~10hp motor that spins at double the rpm.
 
Ok, here's the tag pictures plus a couple more of the handle damage (I think it swung into the forklift mast when they had it dangling from a strap). Supposedly the broken handle is in the coolant tray but I never went looking.

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Ok, here's the tag pictures plus a couple more of the handle damage (I think it swung into the forklift mast when they had it dangling from a strap). Supposedly the broken handle is in the coolant tray but I never went looking.

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This one appears to have the power feed on the head ram, so a fairly decent "boring" machine

Date code "L" is 1942 - so "newer" than I was guessing. :D
 
Here is the drive clutch assy with its sheave. Motor "pulley" needs to turn this drive sheave at whatever speed it takes to run the mill in "speediest" speed to be 600 on spindle - if that is the placarded top speed.

Scan from M-786-2

John:
Your cutaway drawing brought back a memory from when I was a new apprentice. We had one of those honking big Cincinnati milling machines like the one being talked about here. I don't remember what number it was but is was big enough that it had a step on the side to get up to the drawbar. The drive got very loose and loud, bearings were ordered and when they arrived I was given the job of changing them. I remember being really amazed at how well it was made I didn't have to use any great amount of force to get it apart. But what really amazed me was when I got the bearings out was that somebody had written on the bearings with an electric pen the date they were installed xx/xx/1942. Then when I put the new bearings in they just went in finger tight again no force to assemble. I made quite an impression on me that I was working on a machine that no-one had touched there since 1942
 
Here is some "crank handle" effort similar to what it needs. As can be seen, some of it is "store bought". The Phenolic is just a stack of glued together scrap - shaped to suit
 

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If the handle is such a problem I'll dig around in the oil reservoir and if it's not in there I'll braze a Bridgeport Z handle onto the existing collar. I didn't figure fabricating a handle would be a big sticking point for most on here.
 
This is hard to believe! I drove over a thousand miles for my first Cincinnati and had the second one shipped nearly as far.
I figured that would be sold quickly!
Out here though everything industrial costs way more.

They're such a leap up from a Bridgeport it's not even a contest, you'd think people would want it even for hobby work. Out here farmers and ranchers pay top dollar for thoroughly worn out machines just for their own repairs.

Hard to watch from here...... especially at the asking price!
 
They're such a leap up from a Bridgeport it's not even a contest, you'd think people would want it even for hobby work. Out here farmers and ranchers pay top dollar for thoroughly worn out machines just for their own repairs.
That's exactly what I got it for and if I could justify allocating the requisite shop space to this machine I would be keeping it.
 








 
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