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Clausing 5914 Lathe Threading Problem

I jiggled it, I wiggled it, I tapped it, I smacked it, I beat it in, up, down, and sideways, I heated it, I pried it, I cussed at it, and nothing helped pull it out. I even tried vise grips and beating it outward (as much of an angle I could get on it). I can rotate the handle/gear very smoothly & easily, and the handle wobbles very loosely up/down + side to side, but those internal bearing must be fused to the internal handle body. I know this is a long shot, but would anyone have a guesstimate of the distance in my sketch here? I thought maybe I would drill the handle and add penetrating oil (no, I can not get any oil in from the bearing seal on the outer end of the handle). I also considered taking the nut loose from the back, but then I thought the shaft would spin freely and I would be screwed not being able to loose it all the way, or re-tighten it. Anyone have any better ideas them me?

View attachment 401987
Do I understand you to say you want to drill a hole in the oil fitting pressed into the hole through the knurled sliding handle? I suggest you just squirt Kroil into that fitting.

Larry
 
My sliding gear assembly travels roughly 7/8"

The detents are stuck. Soaking them with a solvent will eventually free them.
If the oiler is a problem it can be removed with a drywall wood screw. This will destroy the oiler but you maybe able to place more solvent on the detents. push the screw into the ball and tighten. The screw will slightly grip. then pull the screw like a nail with a claw hammer and it will come out.

If soaking the sliding gear in place does not work you might consider removing the the entire quadrant. Then soaking it in something like mineral spirits, kerosene or even diesel
If you break any of these parts replacement will not be cheap or easy to find.

FYI for roughly 9 years I called my 5914 the money pit.
I bought it on 2/18/2010 and at 1030 AM 2/3/2019 everything on the lathe worked .
This is easily the most expensive lathe I have ever owned...at the same time it has a brake, clutch , a non-threaded spindle and is variable speed.. a bunch of things most home shop lathes do not have. As well the parent company still has several parts for sale.
 
I jiggled it, I wiggled it, I tapped it, I smacked it, I beat it in, up, down, and sideways, I heated it, I pried it, I cussed at it, and nothing helped pull it out. I even tried vise grips and beating it outward (as much of an angle I could get on it). I can rotate the handle/gear very smoothly & easily, and the handle wobbles very loosely up/down + side to side, but those internal bearing must be fused to the internal handle body. I know this is a long shot, but would anyone have a guesstimate of the distance in my sketch here? I thought maybe I would drill the handle and add penetrating oil (no, I can not get any oil in from the bearing seal on the outer end of the handle). I also considered taking the nut loose from the back, but then I thought the shaft would spin freely and I would be screwed not being able to loose it all the way, or re-tighten it. Anyone have any better ideas them me?

View attachment 401987
You may have to take that assembly apart. The 4900-13 slider may be rusted to the 698-068 stud. Or the balls are stuck. They are oiled from DB4-35 oiler. If the slider turns freely, then it isn't rusted to the stud. Get a strong light and look to see what is hitting what. Anyway, time for a test and deduction cycle or two, as random abuse isn't working.
 
Just a useless update here.... I worked on the sliding gear handle for 2 hours today to no avail. I tried the screw in the oiler trick but it did not work, so I got frustrated and tapped it in, it pushed the bearing somewhere inside the shaft. I then used a 5/16" tap to thread/remove the brass oiler escutcheon, once removed it seemed like it was already tapped, but maybe I actually threaded it while removing the brass escutcheon. I then cranked in a 3" 5/16" bolt, it made the gear tight on the last 1/4" but I was still unable to move the handle out. I removed the bolt and filled the handle with AeroKriol and taped the end. Will work it some more tomorrow after I go buy a 4" bolt!
ClausingLathe_20230712_215450715.jpgClausingLathe_20230712_215418639.jpg
 
Just a useless update here.... I worked on the sliding gear handle for 2 hours today to no avail. I tried the screw in the oiler trick but it did not work, so I got frustrated and tapped it in, it pushed the bearing somewhere inside the shaft. I then used a 5/16" tap to thread/remove the brass oiler escutcheon, once removed it seemed like it was already tapped, but maybe I actually threaded it while removing the brass escutcheon. I then cranked in a 3" 5/16" bolt, it made the gear tight on the last 1/4" but I was still unable to move the handle out. I removed the bolt and filled the handle with AeroKriol and taped the end. Will work it some more tomorrow after I go buy a 4" bolt!
View attachment 402232View attachment 402233
Looking at the second picture, it's unclear how that slider could move to the left at all. Is all that correctly assembled?
 
If you see the photo I posted 11JUL2023 you can see the gear marked "SLIDING GEAR", that gear "should" move to the left, but won't. The sliding gear handle has no longitude movement (but I think I got 3/32" play after cranking in the 3" bolt from the end).
 
Time to apply some actual repair technique.
Remove the entire sliding gear assembly by removing the retaining nut behind the “banjo”.
Support the gear fully and press the inner shaft out using a piece of round stock through the hole you made in the end of the sliding shaft.
Use material that has flat square ends,only long enough to reach the inner shaft plus a small additional length for movement.
Hammering on stuff often restricts disassembly by distorting the end of the part.
Be aware that there is a retaining set screw that locates that shaft in the banjo in addition to the retaining nut.
(See parts drawing)
Be judicial in applying press pressure.

Good time to do some maintenance, like cleaning that mess, and checking the gear lash of your gear train.

Lazz makes a point about being sure that the gears are allowed to mesh when the sliding gear moves.
My sense is there should be a point where the two sets of gears should both be out of mesh ( neutral) , can’t have two different ratios in mesh at the same time on a common shaft.
Cheers Ross
 
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Hi guys, I'm not sure if anyone cares or not, but I thought it would be dis-courteous of me not to post an update since you have been so great helping me.

I purchased a 4" - 5/16" bolt, and ran it up the sliding gear handle, but apparently the inner hole was too close of size to the OD of the 5/16" bolt and it stripped as soon as I put pressure on it. My lathe sits in a tight location so I was unable to drill that hole larger, but I managed to tap it to 3/8" with a good taper tap. Unfortunately I was only able to go 1" deep before it got too tight and I didn't want to snap the tap. So I got a 5" - 3/8" bolt, belt sanded the threads off the first 2.75", and then ran it into the tapped sliding gear handle.... but it was all to no avail. (FYI, in retrospect I have learned that when the gear is IN position there is a distance of 3" before you hit the inner shaft (from the outer end of the sliding gear handle), and it is just under 4" distance when it is in the OUT position)

I ended up having to remove the entire setup like suggested. Once out, it was not much easier, and there was no way to remove the sliding gear handle/shaft because it would spin freely. So I finally suspended the sliding gear handle with one hand, inserted a long heavy punch down the 3/8" hole I made in the end, and then beat it into submission and it finally broke loose, and now the sliding gear handle pulls in & out! I do not feel a detent when going in & out, so my fear at this point is that the sliding gear handle might walk in/out of gear while working. But that will be a problem to address when it happens.

I thank you all again VERRRY MUCH for all the tips, advice, terminology, and support!

PS: At the end of the day, it is always RULE #1 that works. RULE #1 = "When Reason Fails, Force Prevails."

ClausingLathe-PushBolt_20230713_223701812.jpgClausingLathe-GearAssm_20230714_010529988.jpgClausingLathe-GearAssm_20230714_011225788.jpg
 








 
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