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Does anyone have an original key for an original Deckel tool cabinet?

Martin P

Titanium
Joined
Aug 12, 2004
Location
Germany in the middle towards the left
I have this large Deckel tool cabinet. This is the wide middle cabinet that has a heavy drawer on top (for heads and stuff) and a large rolling trolley on the bottom, where the really heavy stuff goes and which can be rolled from the cabinet to the machine.
The cabinet has one lock on each side and is open. I have no keys.
The key code is stamped on the locks (WBG 50). There is no manufacturer marking anywhere.
Is there any manufacturer marking on the key? That might make it easier to identify the key code.
This is not important, but it would be nice to have the key(s).
 

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I'll ask my customer if he has a key, he has a Deckel pantograph with cabinets. If he does and it has markings I'll post a picture.
 
Not sure if this is what you want? This is from a cabinet like you describe circa 1968.
 

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Other side (after best scrub this key has ever had)
 

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I think that key is CE7 on page 47 of the catalogue I have linked above. It is a very common type.
Yes, I have a side hobby in locksmithing.
 
Maybe the OP is willing to cut the key by himselft (not a very difficult taks) once given the correct blank.

In the "first world", at least where I live, it has become incredibly difficult to find someone able to do basic jobs like that, or repinning, not to mention lockpicking. All you get is blank stares, or an explanation like, oh the old guy that was able to do that has retired long ago.

While in other countries you can get easily get a skilled craftsman to cut for lost key by scope inspection of the wafers cylinder. No fancy decoders involved.
 
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Of course the objective would be to get a working key, duh.
But also to not spend actual money (2 locks on this cabinet).
There are places that will make me a key from a number for 10€, but this key number is unknown, so they say they cannot (for that money).
CE7 from the catalog interestingliy mentions 'Kind' as a user. Kind is a reputable german cabinet manufacturer.
 
CE7 from the catalog interestingliy mentions 'Kind' as a user. Kind is a reputable german cabinet manufacturer.
The catalog images are real size, so if you print the page on cardboard, cut around the profile, you can confirm that is correct for the cylinder. By look and feel, I think it will.
 
That's key impressioning, and like the author said, it's an advanced tecnique. A couple points must also be noted:

  • It makes sense only when you have no access to the removed lock. If instead you have the lock in hand like the OP, like thanks heaven door was open or there is a backdoor, then just take the pins out, draw their length on a piece of paper, and cut a new key on the template or by eye (short version, but you get the gist). Remove some pins if you want to make it even easier. This can take maybe 10 minutes, vs. many hours of frustration for a beginner.
  • Almost certainly it's faster and easier to pick the lock instead, pin-by-pin or with an electric gun, then proceed as above. Technology has evolved so that specialized ($$$ and restricted sales) tooling is available that makes easy to pick even so called advanced security locks.
Key impressioning was (is ?) mainly used in intelligence and law enforcement covert operations. The scenario is when there is public or security around and you can't risk to attract attention doing the typical gestures, kneeling down or using lockpicking kit.

Rather, with impressioning you just quickly insert and pull a probe blank while looking another way. Then bring to the shop to analyze it (using a microscope or special materials can be needed), cut a first try key and repeat as many times is needed, in some case it may take days or weeks.

I've never done it myself, but never say never.
 
So I had to walk out to the shop and look at my Deckel cabinet.
Mine has 6 upper drawers ( 2 rows of 3)
And a large lower space having a pull out shelf.
Has 2 locks , different numbering from the ones Martin has ( obviously)
Won’t bore everyone with the numbers, as I really don’t care about having keys for a chest I will never lock. I am the only one here. . If the cabinet were lockable more chance I would lock it and loose the key.
What I would be interested in re the cabinets is a layout drawing or photo of what the factory shelves and drawers were setup to hold.
I know there are different cabinets.
On mine (FP2?)I have figured some of it out. The rotary table fits in the middle bottom drawer. Collets and arbors go above.
Test bar :top left.
Tools: top left. What goes in the two right drawers?
Anyone have drawings or photos?

Cheers Ross
 
So I had to walk out to the shop and look at my Deckel cabinet.
Mine has 6 upper drawers ( 2 rows of 3)
And a large lower space having a pull out shelf.
Has 2 locks , different numbering from the ones Martin has ( obviously)
Won’t bore everyone with the numbers, as I really don’t care about having keys for a chest I will never lock. I am the only one here. . If the cabinet were lockable more chance I would lock it and loose the key.
What I would be interested in re the cabinets is a layout drawing or photo of what the factory shelves and drawers were setup to hold.
I know there are different cabinets.
On mine (FP2?)I have figured some of it out. The rotary table fits in the middle bottom drawer. Collets and arbors go above.
Test bar :top left.
Tools: top left. What goes in the two right drawers?
Anyone have drawings or photos?

Cheers Ross
Hey Ross,

I had the same question myself, would be nice to have the company's intention as a start up point.
I think it's:
- bottom left: test bar and indexing head tools (centering vice, chuck, puch milling attachement. There are some round protrusions for those)
- top left : hand tools
- top middle: as you said
- bottom middle: as you said (but not sure what they intended to place behind the rotab, deeper in the drawer)
- top right: possibly only for manuals, mine didn't have a wooden floor with something there, iirc
- bottom right: I had a wooden rack for 40 taper tools like the centers and stuff like this.

I think I sourced a picture at some point, I'll look it up.

BR,
Thanos
 
These are from FP2 documentation

Screenshot 2023-06-17 at 16.47.11.png



Screenshot 2023-06-17 at 16.48.01.png

I have not seen the "specialized cabinet catalog" but I am sure that someone out there has one. Is it on Wrench's CD?

Here's from a slightly earlier FP2 manual:

Screenshot 2023-06-17 at 16.53.35.png

Screenshot 2023-06-17 at 16.53.13.png



And from a somewhat later broScreenshot 2023-06-17 at 17.01.27.png

Screenshot 2023-06-17 at 17.01.12.png

Screenshot 2023-06-17 at 17.00.57.png


chure:
 
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