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Does myasthenia gravis mean the victim should be terminated?

Cannonmn

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Joined
Jun 25, 2016
This malady disrupts signals from nerves to muscles. It is treatable but not curable. How did or would you handle such a case? We have one now. I need to know if the victim is more likely to injure himself.
 
Hi Cannonmn:
Like Conrad Hoffman, your choice of title alarmed me too and put my back up a bit.
I say this because I suffer from MS which is not identical but is similar enough, and the end game is about the same.
At this point, I am mildly disabled, but I am far, far from useless, and I in no way consider myself ready for termination.
I am not even ready to have my life circumscribed with other people's rules about what I may and may not attempt.

Probably one of the best things you can do for those around you with a problem like this is to acknowledge their right to autonomy...believe me, they know their own limitations far better than you or anyone else ever will.

So rather than prescribing their life for them, find ways to help them be the best they can still be...it's not hard to do, and it will do wonders for their continued self esteem and their ability to remain productive.

I have been very lucky in my life, to have those around me who care enough not to meddle with my decisions about me...I wish the same for anyone who confronts shit like this.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
You can't terminate someone over a medical condition...unless you want a big fat lawsuit.
Ok, u r correct of course, so maybe consider moving them to less dangerous job would be an alternative. I think if I ignored it and the MG-afflicted person is injured, I‘m guilty of negligence.
 
Hi again Cannonmn:
I commend you for your compassion in even considering this, and trying to find a solution.
The best plan IMO, is to have a frank discussion with him, acknowledging his growing disability (if not now then later). reassuring him that he is not abandoned and working TOGETHER to map out what a future for him in your domain might look like.
That way everyone who matters knows what is in the wind, and no one feels run over or ignored.

You can demonstrate your consideration for his well being to OSHA if an accident does happen, and he can feel reassured he still has a place with you and your organization and can face his future with dignity.

When you look to implement strategies to help keep him safe, you will have his appreciative support, rather than having him dread the day you arbitrarily pull the plug on him and mining your every move with resentment and suspicion for evidence that you mean to drop the hammer on him.

That's a gift beyond price for him, and you will have given him the best possible way forward with this shit sandwich he has been dealt.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
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Another thing may be to have him talk with his doctor and see what kind of stuff he can can't and shouldn't be doing. This way there's a mutual understanding between the 2 of you and it may make him more comfortable with changes. By having the doctor involved it really takes liabilities off you.
 
Hi plastikdreams:
I respectfully have to disagree with you in this instance...let me explain why from my own perspective:
This is HIS disease and his disability to learn to manage...he gains much more from taking ownership of all of all of it in his own way.
I understand the desire to participate in that effort for his own benefit, but urging him to consult with his doctor when he may not wish to, is at some level intrusive on his autonomy and makes him have to decide whether to comply or not, at the risk of being terminated if he chooses not to (even if it's just in his own mind).

That's not what's intended.
Granted he may not think so...on the other hand he may...even if he doesn't or can't articulate it.

To the OP:
So if he comes to it himself...yes, welcome it, support it...encourage it.

But be wary of pushing it...even in small ways...your best way forward is to let him lead if you can.

Of course that has to balance against safety for him and for everyone around him...not an easy position to find yourself in.

You also have a business to run and cannot afford to carry dead wood much as you may wish to.
I personally, would not feel good about being carried for pity's sake, and I think most people with any personal pride are like me in that, so try to find new roles together that he has a chance to excel at, even as his disability progresses.

The fact that you're his boss makes it harder, not easier, but this is not a typical thing for a machine shop owner to have to deal with, so I urge you to let him lead on this.
On everything else pertaining to your business, you are the owner (I assume) and you get to run it how you want to.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
Hi plastikdreams:
I respectfully have to disagree with you in this instance...let me explain why from my own perspective:
This is HIS disease and his disability to learn to manage...he gains much more from taking ownership of all of all of it in his own way.
I understand the desire to participate in that effort for his own benefit, but urging him to consult with his doctor when he may not wish to, is at some level intrusive on his autonomy and makes him have to decide whether to comply or not, at the risk of being terminated if he chooses not to (even if it's just in his own mind).

That's not what's intended.
Granted he may not think so...on the other hand he may...even if he doesn't or can't articulate it.

To the OP:
So if he comes to it himself...yes, welcome it, support it...encourage it.

But be wary of pushing it...even in small ways...your best way forward is to let him lead if you can.

Of course that has to balance against safety for him and for everyone around him...not an easy position to find yourself in.

You also have a business to run and cannot afford to carry dead wood much as you may wish to.
I personally, would not feel good about being carried for pity's sake, and I think most people with any personal pride are like me in that, so try to find new roles together that he has a chance to excel at, even as his disability progresses.

The fact that you're his boss makes it harder, not easier, but this is not a typical thing for a machine shop owner to have to deal with, so I urge you to let him lead on this.
On everything else pertaining to your business, you are the owner (I assume) and you get to run it how you want to.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
Insurance may require something like that marcus...it's definitely a touchy subject and attorney consultation may be the best route. Especially since the employees, or other employees, well being could be threatened by his illness.

Basically, I don't have a solid answer and quite frankly none of us probably do. It's a difficult situation to be in.
 
I would suggest that if you are worried about him hurting himself or others due to his illness, sit down with him and have a discussion about what other kinds of jobs in the shop he would be interested in. Depending on the type of shop you have, there are many jobs that don't require touching a machine, such as programming, quality control, quoting, scheduling or even be your assistant in taking some responsibility off you.
Im sure if you have an open discussion with him regarding the matter, you could come up with a solution that would benefit both of you.

God luck to both of you

Sam
 
According to Wikipedia, myasthenia_gravis is generally quite manageable with good healthcare provision. That's going to depend on what insurance cover you/he have and what the local healthcare providers are like...
 
In a previous life I ran a company in the IT industry employing the disabled. I agree with everything Marcus has to say regarding those with disabilities and letting them own it. You should only step in to assist when asked. However as a business owner there are obviously issues around safety that need to be dealt with. Just remember this is a person that is going through an incredibly difficult period in their life and I think that we should all strive to live by the golden rule "do unto others as you would have them do to you"

Lastly this is to Marcus. As they say in Australia Marcus you are a top bloke. You always bring something good to the discussion. Good luck dealing with your own health issues.
 
As someone who also has a disability, Marcus is 100 percent correct. It's hard when your body will not do what it used to because of a condition you did not ask for. I have FSP (Familial Spastic Paraparesis) not a very common ailment and not a whole lot is known about it but 2 things for sure is it progresses as the person ages and it only strikes incredible handsome and intelligent people. So as I have gotten older my mobility and strength has decreased and the hardest part for me was admitting I could not do what I used to do. Damn stubborn man brain. Once I did I talked to my employer at that time and he worked with me to keep me involved in machining, but without the constant moving from machine to machine in different areas, and if I did do that he would tell me take as much time as you need. Talk to the employee. Ask what he wants and likes doing. Find a way for you and him to work together so he can be productive and safe.
 
I had a friend with this condition. It kept him in wheelchair and made it tough for him to change jobs. However he earned a PHD in nuclear physics before he was 20. He worked for a company where he built what he needed for his research, things like a mass spectrometer. He went to work for another company and things got slow so they put him in production where he quickly solved a 20 year old problem that kept the yield on an expensive finished detector down to just 60%. A genuine Einstein level genius. He lived to about 60, way past expectations for someone born with it. The flu killed him, not his disease directly. I'd have hired him in a minute if I had a position for him.
 
The man who taught me electronics 20 years ago, you can read a footnote in the book blindmans bluff concerning a project he worked on.

He was diagnosed with MS in his 20's. Perhaps coincidentally a few years after he built his own photocopier machine....in the 1960's.

Take a guess as to what material he probably got a high enough dose of to royally fuck his nervous system.

anyhow, he lived a long time, into his 70's.
 








 
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