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I looked through a couple brands and they don't offer a mechanics length, or a in between screw and jobber. that size I bought more than jobber.
Anyone know which ones have this offering.
 
I've had a lot of fun with Walter 3-flute carbide drills. I'll look up the series # if you want.

I have had very good results with OSG Series 1000 and 1100 HSS drills They're very expensive, but in Al, they last forever.

Regards.

Mike
 
I've had a lot of fun with Walter 3-flute carbide drills. I'll look up the series # if you want.

I have had very good results with OSG Series 1000 and 1100 HSS drills They're very expensive, but in Al, they last forever.

Regards.

Mike
My main tooling supplier said YG-1 and Nachi, I have seen Nachi 3 flute and flat tip, but never used them.
 
How big do you need these drills? Are they for repeat jobs, or do you keep having to buy different sizes/lengths?

Because honestly, depending on size, you absolutely cannot beat MAFord carbide drills for price to value. They run thousands of repeatable holes in stainless, and don't cost much more than a HSS drill. But my experience is only with their smaller stuff (1/4" and under), no idea on big drills... A 1/2" drill is bigger than most of my bar stock.
 
How big do you need these drills? Are they for repeat jobs, or do you keep having to buy different sizes/lengths?

Because honestly, depending on size, you absolutely cannot beat MAFord carbide drills for price to value. They run thousands of repeatable holes in stainless, and don't cost much more than a HSS drill. But my experience is only with their smaller stuff (1/4" and under), no idea on big drills... A 1/2" drill is bigger than most of my bar stock.
Repeat jobs, and buy different sizes lengths, usually shorter, that's why I wanted a supplier that had between screw and jobber also..
less than 1/2" dia.
I actually since we currently are 100% Aluminum like running the Co over carbide, just because its tougher(not as brittle) So I don't have to worry about it breaking.
and if it ever did it can be machined out with carbide, and its cheaper and more readily available in more sizes.

If we were doing more than Aluminum, sure 100%!
 
OK, I asked this about a year a go and didn't get any good answers, so lets try again.
We currently are doing 100% Aluminum So I have only been buying Cobalt drills, no carbide.

I was buying all my drills, spot drills...from Wedevag(Swedish made)
Someone bought the company, and I guess ran it into the ground, and it closed.

I have some Minimills so I like getting shorter drills most the time.

I was getting jobber(standard), mechanic(between jobber and screw), and screw length.
6XD, 4XD, 2.5XD relative lengths.@ 130° TIN

They also had some non standard spot drills I needed for some of our parts metric, 5/32...

Laser marked only, NO stamping.

Can anyone recommend a new drill manufacturer?

Because we get some YG-1 stuff I tried a pack of the parabolic jobbers for Aluminum, they walked like crazy, I know spot, but on a drill on the Wedevag's they didn't walk(bonus).

Wedevag pdf.
i'm a HUGE fan of mitsubishi carbide drills. the only 'downside' is they come in metric size shanks iirc.
 
all my tools are metric, i program in metric etc, the imperial system can suck my nuts!
We have metric clients that everything has to be metric because they have a claim to their customers, metric is tighter tolerances.
But as usual it is all the fractional equivalent size, its not metric sizes. So it says 3.175mm not .125" haha bone heads.

I don't really care either way.
 
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Several decades ago, a spacecraft heading for another planet missed its target. The failure investigation revealed that the mission planners had worked in both imperial and metric units, but didn't bother to let the mission operations folks know that.

In response, management declared that future mission planning would use metric units exclusively.

Some time later, my employer chose to use an attitude control component that was, in essence, an updated version of one used on the lost-in-spacecraft. My employer provided me with that component's Interface Control Drawing (ICD), and told me to develop the procedure that would be used to orient the component's sensitive axes with respect to the spacecraft axis system.

This particular component's size was roughly 10 inch diameter x 4 inch thick, and its weight was roughly 10 pounds. The ICD linear units was the meter -- to seven decimal places. And every damn one of the lengths was within 0.0005 inch of an integer-multiple of 1/16 inch.

My "take-away"? Every dimension should contain both a numerical value and unit of measure, and if the unit of measure comes in different flavors, the flavor should be included: U S gallon or Imperial gallon, statute mile or nautical mile . . . you get the idea.
 
Repeat jobs, and buy different sizes lengths, usually shorter, that's why I wanted a supplier that had between screw and jobber also..
less than 1/2" dia.
I actually since we currently are 100% Aluminum like running the Co over carbide, just because its tougher(not as brittle) So I don't have to worry about it breaking.
and if it ever did it can be machined out with carbide, and its cheaper and more readily available in more sizes.

If we were doing more than Aluminum, sure 100%!

If your process is good, I really wouldn't worry about breaking a carbide drill in Aluminum, unless your coolant flow is bad, or you're purposely pushing it to see how far you can get. Y'know, run till it breaks, then back off 10% :D
 
Worked at place that's how you did setups also.
you don't check tool hangout needs, you don't check CAM depths, clearances.
you don't check anything!

You load it, run it, watch it close, hand on big red, if it crashes, breaks tool, bottoms out on holders, you change tools, fix issue and done.
Highly efficient setup technique!:nutter:
 
Worked at place that's how you did setups also.
you don't check tool hangout needs, you don't check CAM depths, clearances.
you don't check anything!

You load it, run it, watch it close, hand on big red, if it crashes, breaks tool, bottoms out on holders, you change tools, fix issue and done.
Highly efficient setup technique!:nutter:

I once saw a guy doing a setup and asked if he was gonna single block through it. He said "Nah, the feedrate is turned down, if it crashes, it won't hit very hard" and just let it run.
Uggghhhh
 
I once saw a guy doing a setup and asked if he was gonna single block through it. He said "Nah, the feedrate is turned down, if it crashes, it won't hit very hard" and just let it run.
Uggghhhh
I do that now, but you need to reach ninja status at programming and creating setup sheets :D
 








 
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