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Exhaust Fan Recommendations for Rotary Screw Compressor?

TheOldCar

Stainless
Joined
Jul 31, 2011
Location
Utah, USA
Anyone have recommendations for an exhaust/ventilation fan for the “compressor room”?
This is for my day job, not my machine shop. The compressor is a Kaeser SM10 Aircenter.

My limitation is the hole size for an exhaust fan: I could only cut a 12” max hole in the wall.
The compressor will sit about 30” from the wall and the 12” hole sits about 7’ up from the floor.

I have good, open ventilation available about 10’ from the compressor/wall, always open to the main shop.
 
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Are you just trying to exhaust heat from the comp room? We have three Kaesers that just exhaust into the print room , however it is airconditioned with exhaust fans. It doesn't take much fan to move that much air at low(room) pressure maybe 1/2hp? In the winter in a small shop you would be throwing away a lot of heat unless the comp room was sealed off from the rest of the shop.
 
Are you just trying to exhaust heat from the comp room? We have three Kaesers that just exhaust into the print room , however it is airconditioned with exhaust fans. It doesn't take much fan to move that much air at low(room) pressure maybe 1/2hp? In the winter in a small shop you would be throwing away a lot of heat unless the comp room was sealed off from the rest of the shop.
The tech really pushed this heat issue, scaring me into thinking the compressor can only operate on "new" air. And this part of the shop can definitely benefit from the compressor heat! I really appreciate you clearing this up for me. I'll get an exhaust fan to fit and hook up a temp switch for it.
 
Our 40hp compressor just roasts in its room and seems to do fine. When we got it it was out of refrigerant and already has a lot of oil leaks and a bypass issue, so when it dies it dies. It's a warm room but the airend doesn't get outside of a reasonable operating temperature unless it runs low on oil.
 
my rotary screw compressor intakes and exhausts in the same room that is the size of an oversized single bay garage, no issues that i've noticed. it's loud but does heat up that room somewhat nicely. if it deadened up some of the sound I would consider it lol
 
My last day job had one in a compressor room. Fan was about 12" or so diameter and thermostatically controlled. They never had a problem.
Yeah, I think you heard the compressor guy wrong, or he misunderstood. 6500 CFM? Maybe a 400hp fan at 8 feet in diameter.. :eek:
 
Extrapolating from my chart, it appears that for a 10 HP would be about 2000 CFM.

Around here Kaesers service people and sales people aren't the most technically minded. He probably said 6500 CFM and meant "a lot".
 
Thank you all for the help!

Here at work, the air lines are all copper tubing.
One thing that surprised me is the tech said, “If we do install, do you have someone here that knows how to sweat copper tubing?” :eek:

They definitely aren’t doing the install. :rolleyes5:
 
Thank you all for the help!

Here at work, the air lines are all copper tubing.
One thing that surprised me is the tech said, “If we do install, do you have someone here that knows how to sweat copper tubing?” :eek:

They definitely aren’t doing the install. :rolleyes5:
I was pretty shocked on my first one when they came to do the install that was included in the purchase price. The install was them putting the fuses into the fuse block and seeing if it started up. I foolishly thought it might involve them connecting the filters and that sort of thing. Nope. I got to run all around town and grab fittings while the tech was waiting.
 
I was pretty shocked on my first one when they came to do the install that was included in the purchase price. The install was them putting the fuses into the fuse block and seeing if it started up. I foolishly thought it might involve them connecting the filters and that sort of thing. Nope. I got to run all around town and grab fittings while the tech was waiting.
Ridiculous! And becoming common, I think.
 
Some of you guys need to look at what a normal floor fan puts out. Remember the out put pressure is in inches not psi.They move lots of air not really create much pressure as into a closed system like a compressor does.
I think with a little creative ducting you could direct the heat exchanger comp air to where you need it and supply the intake on one side and exhaust on the other side of the shop. Seems to me that by the time the heated air is spread out in the shop and then exhausted you would recover a lot of heat. In the summer might have to redirect it.
 
When we built the new plant the dummies in charge put 2 250hp Gardner Denvers on the second floor office space inside the back of the plant. Florida winters are not bad but some days you need heat. Those compressers would heat the back of the plant. The highest part of the compressor room floor was the floor drains so when the condensate drain plugged it didn't take long to flood the upper office floor ruining a lot of new carpet.

I never calculated how much water is produced by a compressor, never needed to. So one of the guys put a temp drain hose into 55 gal drum while the drain was being fixed.I walked by on start up and there was about 6" water inside when I came back by about 15-20 min later the drum was about to over flow! Contaminated water is pumped into a holding tank and is costly to have it removed. At that time all the department heads were pointing fingers at each other about who was dumping excess water into the sinks that went into the contaminated water. I put two and three together and wondered where the comp drain went, naturally right into the contaminated water, no wonder the usage was so high.
 
I have installed many exhaust fans for companies. 1 I did was for a 50 hp rotary AC. I put in a 12" exhaust which pushed out 2,000 cfm no problem. Put it on a thermostat so it only ran when needed.

AC like steady calm air. You don't want frozen or hot air because the dryer is matched to do "standard" air. If you push hot air into the compressor, the dryer can not remove the moisture from the system so it will live in your pipes until your machine sucks it up. If you push frozen air. You freeze the dryer if it is not a desecant dryer.
 
I have installed many exhaust fans for companies. 1 I did was for a 50 hp rotary AC. I put in a 12" exhaust which pushed out 2,000 cfm no problem. Put it on a thermostat so it only ran when needed.

AC like steady calm air. You don't want frozen or hot air because the dryer is matched to do "standard" air. If you push hot air into the compressor, the dryer can not remove the moisture from the system so it will live in your pipes until your machine sucks it up. If you push frozen air. You freeze the dryer if it is not a desecant dryer.
THANK you.
 








 
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