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feedback on a new type of ERP / software

jasonziolo

Plastic
Joined
Jan 8, 2024
Hi Friends,

I’m a long time lurker but this is my first post. I run a software development company and we’ve been working on bringing a new type of manufacturing software to the market over the past two years that is focused on serving smaller manufacturers (it’s called PrismHQ). I’m writing this because I’m interested in your feedback on a few items. If you have any insights or thoughts, it would be massively helpful – and HUGELY appreciated.

We’re leaning into the following points to deliver a system that can be used to run an entire manufacturing company and is very that is different from what’s available in the market today:

BREADTH OVER DEPTH – The solution combines the best of a variety of different systems into one software package. Through extensive research, we’ve found that smaller companies are overwhelmed by the options and different packages available. So, we’re trying to bring in the best parts of ERP, MES, CRM, bar coding, inventory, and financial tracking into one system.

EASE OF USE (SIMPLICITY) – Most ERP implementations require a lot of training for the end users who are often not excited to be switching systems. Resulting, we’re keeping simplicity first and trying to remove features from the application that it is easily adopted and supported internally.

ONE TIME PAYMENT AND ON PREMISE – We hear ya, you want a system that doesn’t have subscription fees and your data stays within your four walls. While we will primarily offer a subscription service, we will offer non-subscription and non-hosted options as well.

CUSTOMIZABLE (really!) – Gone are the days of changing your process to fit a software package. We’ve built the system in a way where we can customize the solution to your exact process for fulfilling your business needs. This is far beyond just changing labels and colors, and goes into changing the underlying businesses processes and flows to match what the end user needs. We do this using a robust software framework that is part of our IP and “secret sauce”.

Do these items matter to you? How much? Are there major things that you’re seeing the market that’s missing?

While this is NOT a sales pitch, if you’re interested in learning more about what we’re doing and even seeing a demo, feel free to reach out to me at [email protected]. =)

Thank you!

Jason
 
Do you have a YouTube sales demo of what the software looks like and how it might serve a typical small manufacturer or job shop?

Lets say someone has a trailer manufacturing business. They make some combination of machined parts, cut parts and then welded and bolted assemblies. Does your software have some means to track those products as they're produced?

Conversely: job shop where jobs come in batches, get completed and might not be repeated for long periods, or ever. What can your software do for them?
 
Good stuff, thank you. You can read more here: https://www.doriansolutions.com/prismhq-manufacturing-software/.

To answer your questions, yes, we have the following module available to do what you ask:

Customer Relation Management (CRM)
Invoicing and Payments
Inventory Management
Field Service Maps
Replenishment (Purchase Orders/Sales Orders)
Project Management/Scheduling
Reporting

We also have a live demo coming soon (within a few weeks). I'll make sure I post that here when available too.
 
I do some software development on the side, mostly for personal enjoyment, and worked on an ERP for awhile last year. It's currently shelved as I need to steer it in a different direction. Among other things, I'm waiting for GPT-5 to come out to gage the rate of progress in the world of LLMs.

Here's an example of one of many problems I encountered. With inventory management, Kanban is all the rage among "lean" circles. Pretty easy to implement something that incorporates Kanban principles, but there's a big problem: prices fluctuate constantly in manufacturing. There is no price list. I can buy stainless steel 12X a year and get 12 different prices for EACH size. So someone in the warehouse scans a barcode and it automatically reorders an item. Who checks the price? Nobody, that's who.

The AI rage is not all hype. Media reporting is inaccurate and sensationalistic as usual, but there's real stuff happening here. It can be used to address the problem mentioned above. My hot take is that any new business software that doesn't incorporate an LLM in some capacity is going to get smoked by others that do.
 
There is no price list. I can buy stainless steel 12X a year and get 12 different prices for EACH size. So someone in the warehouse scans a barcode and it automatically reorders an item. Who checks the price? Nobody, that's who.

The AI rage is not all hype. Media reporting is inaccurate and sensationalistic as usual, but there's real stuff happening here. It can be used to address the problem mentioned above. My hot take is that any new business software that doesn't incorporate an LLM in some capacity is going to get smoked by others that do.


What do you envision as the role and function of an LLM in your scenario? Does it go out for competitive quotes each time? Interpret the inbound quotes? Something different?
 
What do you envision as the role and function of an LLM in your scenario? Does it go out for competitive quotes each time? Interpret the inbound quotes? Something different?
Probably email the supplier to confirm pricing for starters. Competitive quotes would be a plus.

LLM usage costs would be nontrivial and would have to be passed on to the customer. But it'd still be way cheaper than human labor...
 
Probably email the supplier to confirm pricing for starters. Competitive quotes would be a plus.

LLM usage costs would be nontrivial and would have to be passed on to the customer. But it'd still be way cheaper than human labor...
Interesting. That seems like something that could be templated without an LLM pretty easily. If it is a material in the system already, and you have the potential vendors in the system, merging that information into an email to send is quite simple. Reading the returned email maybe an LLM might help with data entry to interpret the results back into your ERP system, since often quotes are "unstructured". But for the outbound side I'd think traditional programming would be much easier to implement and cheaper to operate.

I've written a couple ERPs now, and I think the advantage is being able to custom program stuff like this. When I do my outbound quotes, the ERP creates the PDF, drafts the response email, and drops it in my drafts folder in my email client to review before sending with one click.
 








 
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