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Finding a Used Lathe w/ Sub Spindle?

There's one on Ebay for under $20k.

OP says he needs a sub for back side tapping. I'm assuming he means with live tools. Do you know if the sub has C? Positioning? Can you get live tools that face the sub?

It seems that on a lot of the older machines with live and sub, the builder didn't really plan on you doing a lot of live work on the sub. OP needs to make sure that whatever you look at can do what you want it to do. Don't assume that because it has live and sub that you can do full polar interpolation milling with an axial holder cutting on the sub. I'm not even sure you can do that with a new Haas.

Alternatively, here's a Doosan that fits your budget.


Take your budget up a little, and these two machines are pretty slick.


I can run my parts and tap in primary spindle and finish on sub, that's fine too.
 
Look at mid-late 90's to mid 20's Mori Seiki SL-150SMC or SL-200SMC. Nice, fast way machines. Servo driven Turret is full live. Solid machine. Fanuc control. Parts catcher. Tool Pendent-(never use mine. Too much hassle.

These days should be well under 30k.
Thanks for the tip--where would I look for more information on operating and programming for these guys? Any tips?
 
Thanks for the tip--where would I look for more information on operating and programming for these guys? Any tips?
Any Fanuc lathe is going to be generally the same, but there are machine specific M codes to sort out. Good documentation and a wide user base helps a ton.

What controls and machines have you used?
 
My SL-200SMC is a year 2000. Basically a Fanuc 18i-TA. Mori has their overlay they call MSC-501. It has full multi column Offsets pages, a Handy Measure and + Input function like many Fanucs of this vintage. Mine also has 6 Work Offsets, Fixed cycles, crash detection, Bar Feed interface, syncro spindles, full C axis on both. Not sure how much of that is options and how much considered standard.

As far as programming, it's just like any Fanuc,. Even so be warned. I have extensive Fanuc Mill experience, but it was back to CNC Programming 101 when going to the lathe. Very little moves over from mill to lathe. Total newb all over again. This is no 2 axis lathe. There is a lot to get to know, and the extensive G and M codes to prove it.

As with any machine, make sure you get all the manuals. Electrical, Ladder, Operators and Programming. You will be miles ahead with and near dead in the water without. Also be sure to get as much live tooling with the machine as possible. You'll go broke trying to tool up a Live Tool lathe from scratch. They're expensive even used. And every used live tool you buy will be of unknown condition until you run it. Especially Z axis ones as they use a 90 degree gear set. Visuals mean very little with live tools.
 
Specifically using fusion360 for programming a sub/y axis lathe.
I’m looking to pick up something soon, likely fanuc

Fusion for the lathe, the elusive great American dream... FingerCAM most of it, only use Fusion to create weird organic shapes and adaptive milling paths to cut and paste in to your hand written program.

I have no doubt that someone could make a Post Processor to handle a given machine, but that's what you'd have to do. Even though they might all be Fanuc the builders have different M codes and things they want to see. I haven't bothered because most turning programs are similar enough to have a template and just tweak the detail; even the initially "hard" part like sub pick off become a very simple adjustment for where you want to grab the part.
 
Fusion for the lathe, the elusive great American dream... FingerCAM most of it, only use Fusion to create weird organic shapes and adaptive milling paths to cut and paste in to your hand written program.

I have no doubt that someone could make a Post Processor to handle a given machine, but that's what you'd have to do. Even though they might all be Fanuc the builders have different M codes and things they want to see. I haven't bothered because most turning programs are similar enough to have a template and just tweak the detail; even the initially "hard" part like sub pick off become a very simple adjustment for where you want to grab the part.
I was thinking this too and almost posted twice that it seems to me that finding an entry level CAM system to work with a sub spindle lathe is unlikely. The other thing in addition to the many M codes are the clearances. I can't imagine that any entry level CAM would have the machine awareness that it will take.
 
Fusion for the lathe, the elusive great American dream... FingerCAM most of it, only use Fusion to create weird organic shapes and adaptive milling paths to cut and paste in to your hand written program.

I have no doubt that someone could make a Post Processor to handle a given machine, but that's what you'd have to do. Even though they might all be Fanuc the builders have different M codes and things they want to see. I haven't bothered because most turning programs are similar enough to have a template and just tweak the detail; even the initially "hard" part like sub pick off become a very simple adjustment for where you want to grab the part.
I’m ok with stitching it all together if need be.
Preferably not. But is what it is.

Once I get my 40 or so parts programmed it will all be rinse and repeat. Load the details from the setup sheet and keep hitting go.

Maybe the odd jobber work. But I’m trying to avoid that and focus on product lines.

Machine would be a fanuc oi-t in a nakamura as200
 
Once I get my 40 or so parts programmed it will all be rinse and repeat. Load the details from the setup sheet and keep hitting go.
The nice thing is that once the lathe program is dialed I think there's less to set up than a mill. I don't even use setup sheets for turning, just comments at the top of the program for drills and taps, collet sizes, and stickout. Not sure if everyone does that but it seems to work out for us.

Similar boat here, re-occuring product line parts.
 
If it were me looking from what you've described- I'd be looking for any Mazak with a 640 or newer control(1997ish-present). Mazatrol - you won't need any cam and will have a machine you can get parts & support for. At your price point that's important. Mazatrol is much faster and easier then any lathe cam system.
 
My first thought was mazak, second was okuma… I don’t know exactly what’s on the market right now but an older (but not too old) mazak with the features described would be in the budget. Lathes are tricky though. A shop in my area recently picked up 2 201x era mazak QTs, both with live tooling. One had been crashed pretty bad at some point (or poorly packed for shipping) and the tool carriage was pointing way into outer space. I was able to get it back into alignment but everyone knows once it’s that bad on a linear rail machine, it will never really be right again. The machine will still pay for itself with the parts it can make even if the occasional long drill operation has to be fudged a little bit. I guess all I’m getting at is in this price range you could end up with a bit of a project.
 
Oh, and don’t get a used haas, any joker can run a haas and the jokers love crashing the sh** out of lathes. One crash on a Haas lathe and the thing is scrap.
 
Don’t the later mazaks use a ms windows based user interface? My experience through history has taught me don’t buy any piece of equipment (machine tool) with a pc as part of the control. They get very hard to support as time goes on. Microsoft has zero interest in their stuff lasting more than 5 years. I just googled some and it looks like the 640 control is windows 95 based.

I have an old Mazak QT15 which is wonderful so I’m not at all down on Mazaks.
 
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A lot of machines run on some form of windows. Windows imbedded might not be perfect but I've rarely run into windows related issues. It's really up to the machine builder to optimize it and make it bulletproof. I wouldn't put that on a list as something to avoid on a solid machine like a Mazak or Okuma.
 
Place I retired from had a Mazak Integrex with Matrix control (windoze based). One day on booting it the screen had no alpha characters displayed. Tried rebooting a few times no luck. Called local Mazak guys, they had no idea what could be wrong. Called Mazak Kentucky with the same result. After a fair bit of dicking around in the gajillion windows files discovered that the language file folder had gotten corrupted. Was able to reload that from a drive image and get the thing going again. Fuck windows based CNCs.
 
Place I retired from had a Mazak Integrex with Matrix control (windoze based). One day on booting it the screen had no alpha characters displayed. Tried rebooting a few times no luck. Called local Mazak guys, they had no idea what could be wrong. Called Mazak Kentucky with the same result. After a fair bit of dicking around in the gajillion windows files discovered that the language file folder had gotten corrupted. Was able to reload that from a drive image and get the thing going again. Fuck windows based CNCs.

Yes, kind of. The thing that blows my mind is that they choose Windows.

The usability benefits of a PC based front end are kind of obvious, but of all the stable and proven options that exist for embedded platforms, they choose Windows. The most flaky, patched together, bug-ridden mess of an OS in existence, they decide that yes, this is the OS we should build our industrial CNC control around. I have never been able to wrap my head around that logic.

I've never used one but some Heidenhain and maybe Siemens? controls use proprietary Linux based systems, which seems like a massively more sensible choice.
 
Purty sure that my Siemens controls boot with Winders.


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