What's new
What's new

Folks I need a saw- Cold or Miterband?

Well thanks guys! I need another saw like I need heart attack but I am hot to trot for the

ACCURA 01079 9 X 7 INCH 60 DEGREE SWIVEL HEAD. It has variable speed, 1" blade, quick angle adjustments and color matches my other equipment. Plus its the right foot print for me. I've got a Baileigh cold saw, Dake V-16 vertical so the Accura should cover any needs I have. Well until I find another excuse to buy something else​

 
My error. I just went back to their website and found the chart. The narrative I was using was for "construction steel" not stainless steel. However, the narrative below the chart says for a "high production on a stable machine" the speed can be increased by 50%-75%. A 75% increase in speed would bring it up to a little over 26 rpm on a 350mm saw. Maybe I should slow down to that speed to get more life out of the blade.

As for the bandsaw speed before I acquired the cold saw I was using the Startrite H175 horizontal bandsaw for stainless shafting up to 2 1/2". I was running it at the lowest speed of 60fpm so that's inline with what the chart says. I wasn't using any chart for the speed selection. I just find I get a better finish and more accurate cut at the slowest speed.
 
DS Machine Works, what is your experience with the Baileigh cold saw? I've had a CS-350EU for about a year and so far, it's done a good job. I don't use it in a production situation, so it only gets used a few hours a month at most. Some others on this board haven't had very good luck with some of their machinery and are a somewhat bitter towards the company.
 
Well thanks guys! I need another saw like I need heart attack but I am hot to trot for the

ACCURA 01079 9 X 7 INCH 60 DEGREE SWIVEL HEAD. It has variable speed, 1" blade, quick angle adjustments and color matches my other equipment. Plus its the right foot print for me. I've got a Baileigh cold saw, Dake V-16 vertical so the Accura should cover any needs I have. Well until I find another excuse to buy something else​


I know right- that Accura saw seems like a good balance of features and price.
Cyanide is getting a kick back so- take what is said here with a BIG grain of salt...

I have a call out to FMB/Pat Mooney to have a rep contact me- those look like same feature set but upping the game on quality.
I will sort this out.
 
Last edited:
my bandsaw (" Accura") is 1/2 that price new, and its got a nice quiet TEFC motor.

ok, my last post here, don't know what more I can do, lol! :D

Hey cyanide- can you grab a measurement for me?
If you back the saw into a wall- what is the overall length set for 90degree cut?
I guess that would be from motor out to end of the vise handle?
And maybe a measurement if you swing the bow over enough to push the cabinet back edge against the wall?
So back edge of cabinet top out to end of vise handle?

And....
It looks like in other markets the Femi saws are kitted with different motors.
This build out looks very similar to the Accura in feature set and size.

 
Last edited:
it's about 56 front to back with head fully raised to vise handle with vise closed, 65 at maximum opening.
you can swing the head and get it down to 48 deep, but it goes to 36 wide.

yup, the Femi looks similar don't know about the motor.
 
Tr....
Just so you have some more info to make a decision, we had to cut this painted steel channel today.
I did a very light edge debur with a small flap wheel (1.250 dia) did not want to hit the flats of the cut.
Picture actually makes it look a bit rough, but I assure you it's very smooth and dead straight across
I used a Q-tip with the customers paint and left zero fuzzies behind.
 

Attachments

  • chan.jpg
    chan.jpg
    119.7 KB · Views: 17
Last edited:
They sent a vid of the simple machine, not as cool as the swingy head ($40,000 for that one, I guess TR is gonna pass on this) but I can still see the usefulness. One place I worked at years ago we did dragster frames and other tube weldments, if you were making bicycles or something I bet one of these would pay for itself fast. The chuck also spins and is controllable so you can do cutoffs or partial cutouts, ovals, whatever. Kinda trick (I'm easily amused).

edit: hmmm. Actually, thinking about it, this would do about 80% of what the bevelly one does. Except for unusual situations, when do you need a bevel through the wall of a tube ?
On thicker stuff, a square cut might be a problem on the acute side of the weld.
Oh. 1.5 Kw. Is that enough for general tube work ?
1.5's pretty good. Not going to be as fast, but tubes aren't that big.
 
i Know you can get clean cuts with delta 4x6 1/2 inch blade band saw, and then use it as a vertical shape cutter. Is it first choice no- but you never have to worry about it and is cheap.
I like the cold saw, but it does not produce as clean of cuts as the urban myth status suggest without effort and exact blade/speed matching.
 
memphisjed said:
"I like the cold saw, but it does not produce as clean of cuts as the urban myth status suggest without effort and exact blade/speed matching."


My experience with the cold saw is that the cuts are extremely accurate, the finish is similar to that achieved with a milling machine, and the blade and speed ranges are broader than many blade vendors would have you believe. They do make blades that have the optimum number of teeth for a specific material size or composition, but they also realize that it's impractical to change blades for a range of differing sizes of the same material. To that end they recommend a single blade that will adequately cover a range of sizes.

As noted in a previous post I've been cutting 316 stainless steel at speeds that exceed the normally accepted range, and still getting excellent results. In the narrative on one site the company states "in a high production situation on a stable machine" the speed can be increased by 50%-75%. I'm sure higher speed will have some effect on blade life, but it does demonstrate that there is a fairly broad range in which the saw will operate properly.

When inquiring about new blades for my machine I was asked the range of sizes, and the types of material it would be used for. I mentioned the typical sizes for 6061 aluminum ranged from 1" to 2 1/2". While they suggested a blade ground for aluminum, they also said it would be acceptable to use a different tooth count than suggested when cutting a dedicated size. Rather than purchasing 2 blades, one with 170 teeth (1" round stock), and a second with 100 teeth (2 1/2" round stock) they recommended a single blade with a 120-tooth count.

I went through the same scenario when purchasing a blade for different size and alloy steels. I ended up with a single blade for multiple size and different composition stock.

Having said all this it seems that the best choice for the OP's operation may be one of the double mitering bandsaws. They have a compact footprint, multiple speeds, a head that can accommodate multiple angles, and a price tag considerably less than a similarly equipped cold saw. Don't get me wrong I love my cold saw and intend to use it on a regular basis. However, this machine was purchased, refurbished, and outfitted at less than 20% of the cost of purchasing a new one. In my case I don't have to worry about it effecting the bottom line. There are no payments to make while it sits idlily in the corner.
 
Last edited:
Given that the primary requirement is to produce accurate mitre joints I wonder if there is any mileage in changing the vice on a fixed head saw to use replaceable jaw sets arranged to produce accurately fixed angles. Obviously this is only practical if the OP only uses a few angles rather than an infinite variety.

It seems to me that accurate, easy setting mitre heads and/or swivel vices are expensive to engineer and are not found on the more affordable saws. As ever there is cost/performance trade off and less expensive invariably goes with tricky to set really accurately.

For example it would seem quite easy to make something like the swivelling jaw set fitted to the Manchester Rapidor power hacksaws using either several sets with fixed angles or pin in hole locations to define various angles on single set. The photo shows the one I got very cheaply many years ago for re-furbishment and installation but never actually used due to finding a later one up running and ready to go. Albeit with fixed 90° jaws.

Rapidor Vice R.jpg
As a one man band I've rarely found using the old technology power hacksaw for stock cutting restrictive. Apart from the first cut it's rare for me to be waiting for the saw to cut off the next section. My Rapidor is very accurate and straight cutting. Perhaps a thou per inch off vertical at worst.
Clive
 
So I decided on the cold saw.
I bought a Haberle.
If not for the fairly remarkable cuts which are possible with this saw I may have taken the good advice here and picked up one of the miter BS’s
In fact I spoke with the Accura guys and will buy one as well in addition to the CS if it seems warranted.

In speaking with Dan Bergman at Haberle US he said these go out to marine fabrication shops due to their flexibility and I can see why.
I will be able to do good work with this saw.

I will update when I get the saw setup and working.

Thank you all for the valuable feedback as I mulled this over.
 
Last edited:
Given that the primary requirement is to produce accurate mitre joints I wonder if there is any mileage in changing the vice on a fixed head saw to use replaceable jaw sets arranged to produce accurately fixed angles. Obviously this is only practical if the OP only uses a few angles rather than an infinite variety.

It seems to me that accurate, easy setting mitre heads and/or swivel vices are expensive to engineer and are not found on the more affordable saws. As ever there is cost/performance trade off and less expensive invariably goes with tricky to set really accurately.

For example it would seem quite easy to make something like the swivelling jaw set fitted to the Manchester Rapidor power hacksaws using either several sets with fixed angles or pin in hole locations to define various angles on single set. The photo shows the one I got very cheaply many years ago for re-furbishment and installation but never actually used due to finding a later one up running and ready to go. Albeit with fixed 90° jaws.

View attachment 385715
As a one man band I've rarely found using the old technology power hacksaw for stock cutting restrictive. Apart from the first cut it's rare for me to be waiting for the saw to cut off the next section. My Rapidor is very accurate and straight cutting. Perhaps a thou per inch off vertical at worst.
Clive
Fabulous old saws, and blades are dirt cheap.
Just cut a 5" dia piece of cast iron on mine, took almost an hour, but it was just fine as I was busy on something else.
Bob
 
The Force was with you...you did not cross to the Dark Side....... :D

I bought the Haberle H90.
This damn thing will dance.
Vise swings in Z and slides to and fro in XY.
Plus, the head rotates to miter and drops to the right all the way over to horizontal.

I will makes good use of this saw.
I am looking at setting up with the M35
cobalt blades.
I need to cut 316 from light wall small tube all the way out to 3” solid rounds and bar.
I am hoping to find I can purchase three new blades and with the one on the saw meet most cut jobs.
 
Last edited:
I'm sure you're going to be more than happy with your new saw. One bit of advice though make sure you buy a couple of each of the most used blade grind and tooth count. While each blade should give you close to 1,000 cuts it will eventually need to be resharpened or retoothed. It usually takes 4 days or so to ship one out, have it sharpened, and returned. If you intend to use the saw while the blade is being sharpened, you'll need to install the spare while the original is out for sharpening. Also keep in mind there is a break in process similar to that of a bandsaw blade. Normal speed for the material should be used, but the feed rate should be cut to about 1/3 for the first ten or so cuts.

I'm not sure what Overland was referring to with the statement "Fabulous old saws, and blades are dirt cheap." Most 350mm blades run between $150.00 and $300.00 depending on the material it's made from and the manufacturer. That may be "dirt cheap" to some, but it's by far the most expensive blade for any saw in my shop. As a precaution against tooth breakage and wear I have 2 blades for mild steel, 2 for aluminum, and 1 for stainless steel. At this point in time, I'm doing more aluminum than anything else. When/if I start doing more stainless, I'll be in the market for a spare blade for that material.

Have fun with your new saw.
 








 
Back
Top