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fusion 360 or something better?

Fal Grunt - Here is a tip moving forward: Grab a HDD duplicator and maybe get an IT guy to help you do a clean install of an OS with the software you need working well if you don't feel it is worthwhile learning to do it yourself (You will do it so infrequently you may forget by the next time anyway). Once everything is dialed in duplicate that HDD and run a second HDD with all your actual working files, and make backups of those files as frequently as you feel you need. This way no matter what happens if you have a OS problem you can format that disk and recopy from the backup HDD and be up and running again like a fresh install in minutes.

I don't have experience with Fusion but I do have experience with AutoDesk and I will never support them. They have burned many people, some really quite severely and more people need to be aware of this. There are likely countless threads out there on this subject.

I can compare MasterCAM to Hypermill in HyperCAD-S and HyperMill in Solidworks. MasterCAM is one of those programs that if you don't mind taking the time you can get a great toolpath 99% of the time. Every once in a while though it will do something really strange that will absolutely destroy your machine, or at least make a very good attempt. One time I regenerated a bunch of operations that had been run before and one of them decided to rotate the defining surface profile 45 degrees even though nothing was changed, and it still calculated the stock properly. What this meant was after everything was all posted it ran smoothly and just milled everything away. In that case it didn't crash or anything and it just happened to be that one day where everything had been running so well that I stepped away just long enough for it to run that specific toolpath (That had been run before, but not since the regen) to run through. It was a light enough step over (Opti toolpath) you couldn't really hear the difference, but when I returned about 50lbs of aluminum was gone and the profile was turned 45 degrees! Shut down and restart the software, recalculate... then it's fine. Try seeing that coming. Back then the machines were drip fed so it was easier to repost than cut and paste old code to make complete programs.

I save a great deal of time working in a Solidworks environment which is already very efficient (I come from Engineering with SolidWorks full-time prior) and then Hypermill which makes such good use of linked values and formulas, let alone amazing 5 axis toolpaths. I worked for a while in Inventor and didn't enjoy that software at all, but I can't speak for Fusion. Obviously there is a significant up-front cost difference, but this is one area where getting an return on your investment might not take that long. You may spend a lot of time working with your CAM software, get something you enjoy using. If it frustrates you or causes you stress you will be spending many hours of your life hating every minute. With CAD, I used to find working in SolidWorks so enjoyable some days I couldn't believe I got paid to do to work with it. I cannot say the same for MasterCAM.
 
I don't have experience with Fusion but I do have experience with AutoDesk and I will never support them. They have burned many people, some really quite severely and more people need to be aware of this. There are likely countless threads out there on this subject.
It is implied everywhere, yet nobody elaborates what is the story? From newbie standpoint all those coroporate greedy SOBs botching software, making everything a subscription, and suing everybody right and left in case of piracy, adding paywall on paywall. What is so specialty evil about autodesk?
 
It is implied everywhere, yet nobody elaborates what is the story? From newbie standpoint all those coroporate greedy SOBs botching software, making everything a subscription, and suing everybody right and left in case of piracy, adding paywall on paywall. What is so specialty evil about autodesk?

I don't have much time now, but just look up the way they handled the perpetual license holders of software developed by CAM software companies that they decided to purchase. It seemed like Lawyers basically were allowed to do what they thought would be best and figure that no one would care or remember how they hurt clients and wound up killing really good software too. I recall reading somewhere that Powermill for Solidworks was one of the best integrated CAM packages for Solidworks that could be had... but then AutoDesk became involved. It has been a long time since I read through so many threads of people devastated by what Autodesk put them through, but it shouldn't be hard to find a few. There are likely many members on here that were affected, they just aren't interested in reading a "fusion" related thread.
 
Isnt it what every big player in the industry does? Allibre did the same couple times just in recent time. Dassault barely developing its software package, but yanking prices through the roof.
 
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I don't have much time now, but just look up the way they handled the perpetual license holders of software developed by CAM software companies that they decided to purchase. It seemed like Lawyers basically were allowed to do what they thought would be best and figure that no one would care or remember how they hurt clients and wound up killing really good software too. I recall reading somewhere that Powermill for Solidworks was one of the best integrated CAM packages for Solidworks that could be had... but then AutoDesk became involved. It has been a long time since I read through so many threads of people devastated by what Autodesk put them through, but it shouldn't be hard to find a few. There are likely many members on here that were affected, they just aren't interested in reading a "fusion" related thread.
Nerv,

Just a historical note....it wasn't Powermill, it was Featurecam. After Delcam acquired Featurecam, they folded a version into Solidworks called Delcam for Solidworks. And, yes, it was an excellent CAD/CAM combination.

When Autodesk acquired Delcam they asked themselves why they had two CAM systems (HSMWorks and Featurecam) integrated and supporting a competitor's product - Solidworks. Thus they sunseted development of the Featurecam integration into Solidworks and had HSMWorks build a version of their CAM system that ran inside Autodesk' own CAD system Inventor.

Fred
 
Hi Fred,

I hope it came through that I'm just going off some pretty rusty memories so it is very likely the details could be off, but I do recall reading thread after thread of people being burned by one underhanded move after another on the part of AutoDesk. Anyone that was directly involved will have much more vivid recollection than I do.

Thanks for the clarification on the software, I have a dongle for Delcam here which may relate to how I came across all those threads to begin with. I do recall that HSM works was also praised for how well it worked in Solidworks but I could be remembering the details wrong. How long ago was Delcam for Solidworks active? Did it have HSM milling strategies? Was it 5 axis capable? Did it have a post editor?

Dave @ Nerv
 
Adesk is not the first corp to fuck over an aquired customer base, or even their own established customer base. I understand the hate and the grudge, I'd have one too. I'm not going to take on someone else's grudge though.
I bought Smartcam back about 1987or so. Smartcam and Mastercam were the 2 top midrange CAMs. Point Control was bought by CAMAX to acquire it's workforce and customer base, then SDRC, EDS, and then UGS. I loved Smartcam, as did most of it's customer base. It disappeared in the late 90s, I forget which company did the deed. I didn't even have a migration path for my data, I had to start over from scratch with another program paying full retail for a new system and new maintenance. this is what corporations do.
Yes, I'm still pissed about it. I don't however expect anyone to share my grudge and take it on as theirs.
I bought Edgecam. It has worked fine within limits. Has gotten real expensive for what it does for me and I don't like their support. I can stick with Edgecam owned by Hexagon (ugh) and be held hostage for their maintenance or switch. So I considered options and experimented with Fusion, have decided to use it for mill programming.
Yes I'm fully aware of what can happen, and it can really suck. I've weighed my options and made the best choice for my situation. I don't hate myself enough to pay for the cost to hold someone else's grudge against Adesk.
 
Kind of strange that it's the one that survived. Maybe this "won in the marketplace" stuff isn't all it's cracked up to be ?
I bet there were other more tasty options to acquire during it becoming bigger and bigger. No big player wanted to shell big buck on mcam, where there were more bang for the buck options to consume
 
Hi Fred,

I hope it came through that I'm just going off some pretty rusty memories so it is very likely the details could be off, but I do recall reading thread after thread of people being burned by one underhanded move after another on the part of AutoDesk. Anyone that was directly involved will have much more vivid recollection than I do.

Thanks for the clarification on the software, I have a dongle for Delcam here which may relate to how I came across all those threads to begin with. I do recall that HSM works was also praised for how well it worked in Solidworks but I could be remembering the details wrong. How long ago was Delcam for Solidworks active? Did it have HSM milling strategies? Was it 5 axis capable? Did it have a post editor?

Dave @ Nerv
Hi Dave,

We were Featurecam users until we had a chance to beta test Delcam for Solidworks starting, I think, end 2011 or early 2012. It was finally released to the public in late 2012. It had some basic HSM paths derived from Powermill and could handle 2.5axis, 3 axis simultaneous and 5 axis (3+2 and continuous). It's post editor was Xbuild, same as used with Featurecam and, to this day, best I've ever used for editing and development.

HSMWorks was considered one of the easiest to use and best integrated of the earlier CAM solutions for Solidworks. Got it's start indirectly with the work of a couple of mathematicians who developed the 'Adaptive' milling tool paths. If you check out the early archives of the Freesteel Blog you can read about how adaptive tool paths came about.

Fred
 
Hey, let's not forget Smurfcam !

In fact, the smurf was better than Masterscam. In fact again, Master was kind of the worst of the middle-good ones. Kind of strange that it's the one that survived. Maybe this "won in the marketplace" stuff isn't all it's cracked up to be ?
AMEN! still have Surfcam as a back up to HSMWorks, it can see any change to your SW file and update to update the toolpath.
 
Here's personal experience with conFusion. People say oh they are constantly updating the software, yes and they jam half baked updates down your throat, and expect the users to tell them what's wrong with it. I was forced to update my OS a month ago, there have been FIVE updates since then. I was just forced to update again and two models and all the associated programs are now gone. Four days work gone and I'm in the middle of the job. The vaunted cloud based system has been down for five days.
No one at this company seems to understand that people are trying to run a business with this shit. This is by far the worst software I've ever used. The UI is so inconsistant from window to window. Click on a field and the cursor might do one of four or five things, all different depending on where you are. When you are trying to get work done this software is an obstacle not a help in many ways.
The sad thing is, if they implemented it properly, they could own the sub $10k market. But the business model makes no sense. If they do it right, who would buy the higher end product? So they produce a piece of junk that the kids printing pokemon figurines love.
Maybe I just expect to get something for my money or maybe I should have paid for Solidworks or Mastercam. I'm just surprised how consistantly they fuck us over. And don't get me started on the multi-axis bullshit they pulled on us.
 
I don't use it much but I don't care for the sketch I import from a CAD Link product that is way easier to create a sketch in. It sucks switching between different software but I spend more time fucking around trying to sketch something in fusion than just doing it and importing it. Maybe I just need to spend more time I'm pretty sure it can do it I'm just not sure how much time I want to devote to software I'm not really sold on.
I agree though if you have experience with fusion it's probably best to get the ball rolling with what you know.
 








 
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