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Gerstner clone yet again.

This wasn't furniture grade wood, it was band sawed out of a cut down tree. They sure priced it like it was furniture grade though! Oak is used in heavy duty trailer decks for strength, and my trailer is set up for 2" thick boards. I will probably never load it heavily enough to notice the difference though.

Sometimes you can get PT fir which is stronger than SYP but doesn't take treatment as well.

I see they sell brazilian wood for trailer deck, but don't give it away

If you have a planer with blades you don't love anymore gluing and screwing PT to make laminated decking would probably be as strong as oak and as long lasting as PT
Might be time consuming but you could plane 2x PT and glue and screw 1x PT to it to get to close to 1 3/4

When I built my deck I needed PT to span 8 feet as a deck surface, and realized that Home Despot was selling #3 for more than my local lumberyard was selling #2 for
 
If you switched over to jewelry boxes, you would never run out of happy recipients :)

Your chests are beautiful.

Thank you.

I've pretty much filled the jewelry box squares.
Here's two my wife claimed.
An un-figured cherry with curly maple inlay and a highly figured crotch walnut also with curly maple inlay
The upper tray slides back and forth to reveal whats underneath......Bob
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As one of my mentors told me years ago, "There is no such thing as scrap walnut." I have to add cherry to the basket. Very nice work. The last chest I made is now serving as a sewing kit for my granddaughter.
 
Beautiful woodworking. Excellent craftsmanship.

My question regarding the Gerstner upper toolboxes though - Does anyone actually use them as a "Machinist's" toolbox? That is, for actual machinist's tools, in the metal cutting trade(s)? I've never really understood that part of it...




This thread does bring up an interesting idea I've kicked around for a while. I inherited my Dad's 80's vintage Craftsman toolbox for my at-work machinist's tools. It's getting kind of tired, and I'm not sure how much longer it'll be viable. Given what well-made-in-the-USA toolboxes cost, I don't know what I'd replace it with, when the time comes.

I've often thought of making a rolling tool chest from wood - this thread brings it back to top of mind.





Given my pace at woodworking, I'd probably be money ahead to get a part-time job stocking shelves somewhere, and pay the extra coin for the expensive toolchest. Money & time ahead. Else, I may not get it done before I retired...:o
 
Beautiful woodworking. Excellent craftsmanship.

"My question regarding the Gerstner upper toolboxes though - Does anyone actually use them as a "Machinist's" toolbox? That is, for actual machinist's tools, in the metal cutting trade(s)? I've never really understood that part of it"...

I left the trade many years ago for greener pastures so not too sure of the current use of wood tool chests. Back in the day a well worn but cared for Gerstner chest was the mark of a journeyman tool maker. Only his precision and/or fine tools were kept in it. Wrenches, files, hammers etc were relegated to other places.
I can remember when guys would save money towards the day they could buy a "real" chest. A Gerstner.
Of the chests I made only two I know of are used for machinist tools. Mine and a just retired tool maker friend's box. The others are doing duty as jewel boxes, to store an arrow head collection, a marble collection, a fly tieing stuff box, a shooters gear box,
etc etc. It's all good......Bob
 
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I've got a couple Gerstner top chests, an O-42 and an O-52. I use them in my basement workshop and leave the steel toolboxes for the actual machine shop area.
 
Beautiful woodworking. Excellent craftsmanship.

"My question regarding the Gerstner upper toolboxes though - Does anyone actually use them as a "Machinist's" toolbox? That is, for actual machinist's tools, in the metal cutting trade(s)? I've never really understood that part of it"...

I left the trade many years ago for greener pastures so not too sure of the current use of wood tool chests. Back in the day a well worn but cared for Gerstner chest was the mark of a journeyman tool maker. Only his precision and/or fine tools were kept in it. Wrenches, files, hammers etc were relegated to other places.
I can remember when guys would save money towards the day they could buy a "real" chest. A Gerstner.
Of the chests I made only two I know of are used for machinist tools. Mine and a just retired tool maker friend's box. The others are doing duty as jewel boxes, to store an arrow head collection, a marble collection box, a fly tieing stuff box, a shooters gear box,
etc etc. It's all good......Bob

I remember the same back when I stopped working for the man 25+ years ago, precision tools that were kept clean and did not get a lot of heavy use were kept in them. Dead blow hammers, pliers, screwdrivers, etc, did not see the inside of a Gerstner.
 
Does anyone actually use them as a "Machinist's" toolbox? That is, for actual machinist's tools, in the metal cutting trade(s)?
What do you call "machinist" tools ? Micrometers, calipers, wigglers, intermikes, bore gauges, handbook (the two-handbook-drawers version was kind of a waste, and walnut is pretty but oak more sensible), all that stuff in a Gerstner. Below that, the red Snap-On chest for hammers, wrenches, sockets, timing light, pullers, etc. Did that most of my life.

How else would you do it ?

I've never really understood that part of it...
Does not compute ? where do you keep your stuff then, in a cardboard box ?
 
What do you call "machinist" tools ? Micrometers, calipers, wigglers, intermikes, bore gauges, handbook (the two-handbook-drawers version was kind of a waste, and walnut is pretty but oak more sensible), all that stuff in a Gerstner. Below that, the red Snap-On chest for hammers, wrenches, sockets, timing light, pullers, etc. Did that most of my life.

How else would you do it ?


Does not compute ? where do you keep your stuff then, in a cardboard box ?

All of my working tools, including mics, calipers, depth & I.D. mics, general mechanics tools, drills, chucks, parallels, 1-2-3 blocks --- you get the idea --- They all reside in an 80's vintage 26" wide, Craftsman rolling tool chest. I removed the matching top chest, and gifted away the matching side-hanging chest to my brother - all in an effort to make the box more mobile, and easier to actually *work* from. Personally, I'm a big fan of using the top of the chest as a table and/or working surface.

I like the look of the Gerstner chests, but never really understood how they could be useful as a working *Tool Box*. The tiny, felt-lined drawers seemed more apt to holding trinkets - much like a jewelry box. To be honest, I've never worked any place, where a Gerstner tool box was used on a move-about, working tool chest. I remember exactly (1) Gerstner top chest, which sat atop a stationary tool chest, which itself, never moved from it's parking spot. Most others sat on a workbench, with a fair blanket of shop dust on top...


I'm glad to hear that you, somebody, anybody actually worked from them.
 
The reason for the tiny drawers is that you don't want delicate stuff piled on top of each other. My Gerstner 82 sits on top of a vintage Hamilton cabinet between the two Monarch lathes with all my personal tools in it.

Almost anything heavy enough that you would put it in a Craftsman roll around is shop equipment that stays on or around a machine.

When I worked as a tech we all had our own brown Kennedy toolboxes, so I felt the utility of that style from early on.

I have bought vintage Gerstners for guys that have worked for me and am working on refreshing if not really restoring a 1940s one for my employee right now after it has been used as is and grimy for a decade. He was stunned when I sanded and shellacked the front cover
 
The drawers are very shallow, but that's a good thing for little loose tools. My metal toolboxes are Matco, Mac, Kennedy and Craftsman, and they all have a lot of the deeper drawers that little tools get lost in, then you need to dig around in the jumble to find them. The Gerstners have the drawers made so you get a single layer of tools right at hand. At that they excel. I don't think they were ever meant to be a general mechanic's box, and I wouldn't want to use one for that. Larger bulkier tools need to be kept elsewhere.
 








 
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