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Google Drive Desktop

Trevor360

Aluminum
Joined
Jul 25, 2021
I don’t want to start an argument here about cloud security and owning your data, but I know this is a “risky” topic to bring up on this forum. I am not ITAR, I have an offline backup of my files I take every 2 week, and I honestly am not doing anything so proprietary or top secret that I need to be worried about hackers or data becoming public. With that said my questions about logistics of doing this:

I am thinking about using google drive desktop for all my file management for my business including all types of files (Mastercam, Solidworks, Excel, PDF, STP, gcode, Etc….) not just google sheets and docs files. This seems like an easy way to access my files from any computer, and to share access to files with others and then remove access if needed (such as an employee). I have worked in a lot of business that use an inhouse server and then VPN into that server when working from home, and honestly there are always problems with connecting, lots of lag, and the user experience has not been great. I am also a 1 man shop, so if I am traveling for work and the power goes out (for example) there will be no one there to reboot a server until I return.

Seems like google drive desktop is simple to manage and easy to use, easy to access anywhere, and pretty foolproof compared to setting up a server. Is anyone else using this or is there another service I should consider instead (Onedrive, AWS, etc.)? Do you think it will play well with these odd file times such as Solidworks and Mastercam?
 
With some further reading sound like these files don't play well with Google drive. Maybe an AWS server would be best?
 
Google drive looks like any other drive on your pc when you install the app. The lag could be an issue for some applications. I use Google drive for everything, except fusion, which is cloud based. I could throw all my computers in the dumpster, go to Walmart, and be back up and running in a couple hours. I even have cheap chrome books for basic stuff on the shop floor. I'm not an IT guy, so I trust Google more than myself.
 
I am thinking about using google ...

And Dr Faustus thought it was a great deal when he signed that little paper, no big deal, what's a no-account soul compared to getting the pussy ? It's so convenient !

Personally, I never felt any sympathy for the man. He knew what he was signing and deserved to go to hell. Could never get into that story, for that reason.
 
With some further reading sound like these files don't play well with Google drive. Maybe an AWS server would be best?
Why not? For a one man shop it should work. There are problems if multiple people work on the same file and it's unable to sync. You can try the free accounts if you want to be sure.

I use OneDrive for my personal stuff (1TB for 65 dollars a year).
 
They all work fine with files from MC, Solidworks, etc.

Google Drive integrates easily with gmail if you're using it and that matters.

As a standalone app, I've found Dropbox to be consistently better. I thought Drive would improve over a span of 10+ years but it's always been behind, even to this day. It never crashes or corrupts files, and version control has saved me more than a few times.

I never gave OneDrive much consideration, but now that Microsoft introduced Copilot AI, that might change. I checked out Google's Bard AI and it definitely wasn't at the same level as GPT, which is what Copilot and Bing run on.

I'm not aware of any AWS services at the consumer level. Most of them seem to be at the enterprise/IT level.Attach files
 
If you have the funds buy a NAS (Network Attached Storage) Appliance. It is like a server but less complex. I think I paid about $1000 for mine 12TB. The upside is that you have everything onsite and you have backup / parity for the system if you lose a drive. I find hosted solutions are great and easy to get into, but if you need a back up or if you want to move your support it can shut you down for over a week until they send you your data.

I think a dedicated system and an IT setup for back up to the NAS will pay for itself in 18 months or less. You will probably be paying close to $100 / month for back up when you look at options. Also they will start up-charging as your storage size grows.

We use MS onedrive but our storage and data we keep local. Also if you have NDA's in place having onsite storage could be an asset.
 
If you have the funds buy a NAS (Network Attached Storage) Appliance. It is like a server but less complex. I think I paid about $1000 for mine 12TB. The upside is that you have everything onsite and you have backup / parity for the system if you lose a drive. I find hosted solutions are great and easy to get into, but if you need a back up or if you want to move your support it can shut you down for over a week until they send you your data.

I think a dedicated system and an IT setup for back up to the NAS will pay for itself in 18 months or less. You will probably be paying close to $100 / month for back up when you look at options. Also they will start up-charging as your storage size grows.

We use MS onedrive but our storage and data we keep local. Also if you have NDA's in place having onsite storage could be an asset.
If you go that route I'd recommend Synology. I have one at home that's running since 10 years without any problems and we use one at the company I work at. I sync the important folders to OneDrive at night.
 
I use google drive to automatically back up all production files. I also have my computer set to automatically mirror production files from my computer to our NAS, which I use for machine programming on other computers as necessary.
I refuse to work off of the network drive because other people can muck up the drawings. As it sits anyone who needs to access the drawings can, but it gets overwritten if they change it.
 








 
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