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Gorton 3u pantograph

Mobdaily

Plastic
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
I just picked up a gorton 3u in great shape. The only thing missing was the motor and mounting bracket. I managed to snag the bracket from eBay, and I have a few small motors laying around to use. My only problem is that I cannot find the pulley for the motor, or at least some dimensions on the step sizes and width of the pulley. I have the means and the ability to make one, I just need a few dimensions. Can anyone help?72159171143__3F416A26-DBE8-4DFF-9B83-127FA3A11E6C.jpeg
 

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Unfortunately, I have a P1-2, which looks like the belt pulleys are different from the 3-U. The P1-2 uses a two step pulley on the motor, that goes to an intermediate 3 step pulley on an articulated arm. A flat belt runs from either of the two steps on the motor to the bottom step on the intermediate pulley, with the top two steps for the corded belt that goes to the spindle. On mine , the top motor pulley step outside dia. is 4" dia, and the bottom step is 5 -1/2" dia. And the whole things looks to be 1- 1/2 tall. Now this is very "eyeball" approximate as measuring was difficult .
 
I just picked up a gorton 3u in great shape. The only thing missing was the motor and mounting bracket. I managed to snag the bracket from eBay, and I have a few small motors laying around to use. My only problem is that I cannot find the pulley for the motor, or at least some dimensions on the step sizes and width of the pulley. I have the means and the ability to make one, I just need a few dimensions. Can anyone help?View attachment 416888
 
Hello,
I have a Gorton 3U that is original and complete. I see this was posted a while ago. Do you still need the diameter of the pulley? The one I have has an outside diameter of about 5-1/4” and 1/2” wide. (Tape measure) I looked at this and found another 4” diameter secondary pulley that I didn’t know was there. All one piece.

Did you ever get the machine working?
Dave
 
Unfortunately, I have a P1-2, which looks like the belt pulleys are different from the 3-U. The P1-2 uses a two step pulley on the motor, that goes to an intermediate 3 step pulley on an articulated arm. A flat belt runs from either of the two steps on the motor to the bottom step on the intermediate pulley, with the top two steps for the corded belt that goes to the spindle. On mine , the top motor pulley step outside dia. is 4" dia, and the bottom step is 5 -1/2" dia. And the whole things looks to be 1- 1/2 tall. Now this is very "eyeball" approximate as measuring was difficult .
I also have a P1-2, but the belts are a bit different than yours.

The belt from the motor to the intermediate pulley is a V belt - a 2L310 - not a flat belt. The belt from the intermediate pulley to the spindle is a round fabric belt.

Why, you might ask, do I happen to have this information right at my fingertips? Well, I was using the machine late last night. The round belt, which was old and pretty frayed, must have either snapped or jumped the pulley and caught under the V belt. Result - both belts broken.

Luckily, I had replacements for both belts on hand. From Famco, who support the Gorton machines. The belts on the machine may very well have been the originals, easily 50 years old or older. Pretty good life, I think.

I’ll order new belts from Famco, just as insurance. They are great to deal with, by the way. Some of their parts are very expensive - the proprietary collets, for example. Or their font sets. But when I ordered those belts five or so years ago, I also needed a ball crank handle. Expected to pay dearly. But the guy on the phone said “Hey, I’ve got a used one here on a scrapped machine”, and threw it in for only a few bucks. Made my day.
 
Good to know. I must have been into the red wine at the first post, as the motor to intermediate pulley is indeed a V-belt. Luckily, both look to be relatively new. That machine has turned out to be quite handy over the years.
 








 
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