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Haimer digital 3D Sensor / Taster will not set / reset or turn off

Donkey Hotey

Titanium
Joined
Dec 22, 2007
Did my diligence on trying to find if this was already discussed. I have a digital Haimer 3D taster, purchased non-working from eBay at least ten years ago. It arrived and the first problem was getting preload between the display and the conductive strips that mate it to the board. The display was blank. With some delicate tweaking of its metal frame, that was easily corrected and the display now works. It displays position just fine. The mechanism is smooth and responsive.

But that's as far as I've gotten. I have no original instructions. Their website offers no downloadable manual. I even sifted through the German version of the site. Nichts.


Haimer.jpg




Problems:
  1. The MODE button does nothing. I'm expecting that it should change between inch / mm. Not how it works? It looks identical to that photo above: SET and MM displayed and the value is zero. I understand the stylus is 4mm but, the display units do or don't change?
  2. ON/OFF does nothing. Hold it for ten seconds and nothing. Doesn't reset the zero value. I tried deflecting the mechanism 2mm and using this to reset zero. Doesn't work.
I also tried combinations of holding both buttons. I removed the board and verified with a VOM that both buttons work properly but, don't appear to command anything. I just added clear tape over any bare areas of the board, in the off chance that the metal frame for the LCD was shorting something. No change.

Can anyone with one of these units confirm how the buttons are supposed to work? Does anyone know if repair service from Haimer has improved? Everything posted here suggests they're impossible to get repaired. This has been one of those many projects I was going to 'get to someday' and that's now.

Thanks in advance for any guidance.
 
But that's as far as I've gotten. I have no original instructions. Their website offers no downloadable manual. I even sifted through the German version of the site. Nichts.
But but but ! Service ! Support ! Brand name ! Local dealer !

Not to beat a dead horse that refuses to go down but every time I turn around here there's ten people squealing service ! support ! .... in the middle of a hundred threads like this asking for help.

I'm not going to be an extremist and say those are not things to think about, but out here in the RealWorld (tm) where I've been exiled, in many cases they just aren't that wonderful. Maybe most cases.

Generally, we have to put on the bigboy pants and figure it out ourselves, or find an aftermarket guy or someone else who has one and went through the problem. Except for a brand new machine, I don't think the mystical "service! support!" are as important as many claim. Which means that paying ridiculous prices for something you don't actually get is not real smart.

Okay donk, sorry, back to your thread asking for community advice because in real life .... ahem :)
 
Generally, we have to put on the bigboy pants and figure it out ourselves, or find an aftermarket guy or someone else who has one and went through the problem. Except for a brand new machine, I don't think the mystical "service! support!" are as important as many claim. Which means that paying ridiculous prices for something you don't actually get is not real smart.
I agree. I took a chance that whatever was wrong was fixable. Getting the display working was part one of helping myself. Picking over every component on the board with a magnifier and looking for sources that might be shorting the buttons was another. Now I'm down to the question of whether I'm using it wrong, it's worth sending to Haimer for repair, or holding out for a crashed one that I can harvest a board from.
 
You didn't provide any actual pictures of the board or button setup. I assume it is all surface mount, but if there are any electrolytic capacitors in there, step #1 is to replace them. Also, unclear how and where you tested the membrane buttons, I assume you checked their continuity. But it's possible they are not conductive enough for the board but are still able to give a reading on your meter that makes you think they are working. Try physically shorting the button traces by hand and see if that makes any difference.
 
Fwiw, when you switch the display on it should display at 2.000 The instructions mention you may have to first move the probe in multiple directions multiple times to get the display to stabilize at that 2.000 number. Changing between MM / Inches, briefly press the mode button and which measurement system your then in will be shown on the display. They also caution that the probe must be in a neutral position before switching off otherwise an incorrect number will be shown when switching on the next time.

If the starting number is incorrect when switching on such as after a battery change. You have to manually input that starting number.

Set the unit to MM (mode button)
Press the mode button and hold it down until you see 000.000
Use the set button to set the display to 002.000
Switch back to measuring mode by pressing down and holding that mode button.

Removing the battery, waiting maybe a few seconds and reinstall the battery will cancel any incorrect inputs and allow you to start over if required.

In my opinion these 3D units work the best in there own dedicated tool holder that it's then been correctly zeroed to. I use mine in a manual R8 BP clone. So I zeroed my Haimer in a decent quality 3/4" R8 end mill holder that it's never taken out of. There's some information here,
and sort of the zeroing method. He uses a new ER 32 chuck and collet for his Haimer. Yeah it works just as well, but a 40 taper end mill holder would be just as good and a lot cheaper. I also think if your dro / cnc display has been checked against decent gauge blocks and known to be accurate, then its also a good idea to then double check these Haimers against those same gauge blocks to ensure they do in fact correctly read zero between any two known points.
 
Recommend you don't spend too much time on it.

The digital haimers are much less pleasant to use than the analogue ones and if you do spend a lot of time making it work you will probably regret doing so.
 
Also, unclear how and where you tested the membrane buttons, I assume you checked their continuity. But it's possible they are not conductive enough for the board but are still able to give a reading on your meter that makes you think they are working. Try physically shorting the button traces by hand and see if that make
Good tips. I'd expect any caps to still be good. The unit only existed for a few years when I bought it already dead. Still worth checking but, man, that would be a short life. Also: they're the silicone clicky switches, not membrane. I flushed them out with electronics spray and a gentle blast of air but, your point is taken. I guess I'm going to check for voltages there anyway.

Fwiw, when you switch the display on it should display at 2.000 The instructions mention you may have to first move the probe in multiple directions multiple times to get the display to stabilize at that 2.000 number. Changing between MM / Inches, briefly press the mode button and which measurement system your then in will be shown on the display. They also caution that the probe must be in a neutral position before switching off otherwise an incorrect number will be shown when switching on the next time.
A million thanks. That was exactly what I needed to know and suspected. Yeah, these buttons don't do any of that. Time to start chasing circuits under the magnifier. I had seen that video you linked. It was the only one out there that showed the digital unit in use at all.

Recommend you don't spend too much time on it.

The digital haimers are much less pleasant to use than the analogue ones and if you do spend a lot of time making it work you will probably regret doing so.
I saw your comments elsewhere about it. Points taken. Digital and analog indicators are different and each has their strengths. In the case of standard plunger indicators, I prefer digital for absolute alignment. For a coaxial indicator, analog is better and easier to read. For indicating parallelism, a low friction tenths dial is preferred. When aligning the stylus on a Renishaw probe, the tenths indicator isn't enough. It also has to be one with adjustable spring pressure because even a smooth Mitutoyo digital indicator has too much force to read the ruby tip without deflecting the mechanism.

There will be times where I will reach for this Haimer if I can get it working properly.
 
Glad some of that might help.

It's only my gut feeling, but I suspect the video I linked to isn't the most qualified and experienced machinist on the block. He seems to spend more time going the wrong way on the zeroing adjustments, then cuts away until he's finally figured it out. There really not that hard to get zeroed to whatever tool holder there semi permanently mounted into. Wish I could help with whatever issues yours may have, but I know zero about electronics.

Unless things have changed, Haimer seems to have little interest in providing any direct technical support if my own experience was any indication. So going through one of there dealers might be your best route. And afaik anything major for repairs has to be done in Germany since there doesn't seem to be any other factory authorized repair centers for either the analog or digital units.
 
Took it back apart and got pictures this time. Spent some time poking around with the VOM. I would expect the two switches to either be +V or ground but, seem to be neither (at least from very preliminary poking around with probes).

Battery positive comes in on the silver pad immediately to the upper right of the slide switch. Negative is obviously the big copper terminal. Shining light through the board reveals nothing. There seems to be a lot of dead-end traces that exist solely to get to test pads on the board. That chip-on-board construction almost ensures this is a throw-away item if something obvious doesn't turn up like one of those few discrete components being bad.

It seems the IC hiding under the blob has to talk to the two switches. The next step will be squinting at this with a backlight and trying to find out which pad is which switch and if any components are in between. Maybe I'll print a giganto copy of this picture and start labeling pads.
taster1.jpg


Not much on the face-side of the board, except the switches and the contact strip that feeds the LCD display. I'm assuming the grid patterns are for RF shielding. Probably not a bad idea around CNC machines.
taster2.jpg


Edit to add: traced both switches back to the IC. No problems on that side. Good continuity.

Final edit for the night: my fun meter is full for tonight.
 
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The switch next to the power contact is interesting. Maybe default units? I'd clean and test it anyway as failing open could cause the thing to lock up. If you have a bench power supply or can get the battery in proper contact, it would be interesting to see what it does without the encoder attached. Suspecting the physical stuff, contacts, encoders, ribbon cables, is best since they are the easiest to fix anyway.
 
She's fixed. Nobody will ever have this exact problem again but, I'll share so we have closure. Found this buggered up trace next to the left pushbutton switch. Yes, that trace is common to both switches.

I cleaned and fluxed the area. I tried to get solder to flow across without bridging to the switch lead and couldn't do it. So I soldered a jumper to a via elsewhere on the board. Works perfectly now. Thank you to everyone for the help.

taster3.jpg
 
You ask a good question. If there's something to be learned, it's to be careful when we're taking apart electronics. As originally shared, I bought it dead on eBay. I may have paid $100 but, not much more. It had already been apart when I got it.

The primary problem was the LCD was not working. There is a metal shield that holds the glass display and preloads it against the circuit board. Through some creative bending, I was able to get that properly sprung and working again. It had obviously been pried against to get things disassembled in the past and that is probably when the board damage occurred.

This also caused me to look at the analog taster I originally bought 12+ years ago. I thought it was an early Haimer variant but, apparently it's a Haff & Schneider. Never really paid attention until noticing the tips were different.
 








 
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