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"Hand Hewn" molding planer ???

duckfarmer27

Stainless
Joined
Nov 4, 2005
Location
Upstate NY
Doug -

Would think it possible to do that way. Pattern repeats quickly, which would lead one to think the roller/cutter is not too large in diameter. Don't know how they do the same on solid wood flooring - been common for the past 10 years or so. And not repeating as fast - at least does not appear to.

Kind of doubt one of a kind machine, patenetable, yada, ydada. But then it IS Altoona.

Dale
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Location
Totalitarian Ruling Capital, EastAsia
They make wood molding that way with rollers. Have for well over 100 years. I do not see a patent in the future.
No joke, Jose. We did some work for a place in Nawth Cahlina that had machines for artifically aging flooring and panelling. No chance in China, they like 'new' stuff here, but definitely in existence for a long time.

Of course, seems like you can patent anything in the US (ask Gene). Even red shoes. So given enough lawyers ...

Looking at their sample part, I can see an improvement though ... put the gouging rolls on x-y stages, then feed them from a random number generator. That way the "hand-hewn" marks would not repeat at distinct (and easily spotted) intervals ...
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
Looking at their sample part, I can see an improvement though ... put the gouging rolls on x-y stages, then feed them from a random number generator. That way the "hand-hewn" marks would not repeat at distinct (and easily spotted) intervals ...

Yup, that's kind of what I thought.
You'll want a "Random within upper/lower limits" sort of controls.
 

Georgineer

Hot Rolled
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Location
Portsmouth, England
No joke, Jose. We did some work for a place in Nawth Cahlina that had machines for artifically aging flooring and panelling. No chance in China, they like 'new' stuff here, but definitely in existence for a long time.

Of course, seems like you can patent anything in the US (ask Gene). Even red shoes. So given enough lawyers ...

Looking at their sample part, I can see an improvement though ... put the gouging rolls on x-y stages, then feed them from a random number generator. That way the "hand-hewn" marks would not repeat at distinct (and easily spotted) intervals ...

I guess then that you don't like the 'mock ancient' distressed timber they put in the ceilings of Old-e World-e bars.

George B.
 

atomarc

Diamond
Joined
Mar 16, 2009
Location
Eureka, CA
I think that machine may be more complicated than meets the eye. At a feed rate of only 16 feet per minute, especially on the pine material that is shown, any normal moulder would burn the shit out of the wood. If the board shown was made in a single pass, which it probably was, you can see part of the 'lap' is clean and smooth which would indicate to me that it's actually the molder heads that may move up and down to create the 'hewn' effect, while the head to create the lap is stationary.

We ran a production Weinig moulder that was hot-rodded up to over 400 feet a minute on Redwood, and if that jammed for even a second, the heads would burn the material.

This is all speculation of course, but I will say that a feed rate of 16 feet a minute is like watching paint dry. Visualize a hand fed planer in a wood shop planing a 16' 1X6 and having to wait a full minute from start to finish!:eek:

Stuart
 

trevj

Titanium
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Interior British Columbia
Looks to me like they have a series of eccentric running cutter shafts, maybe chain drive, and eccentric only on one end at a time, each with a stack or a variable width cutter head on it. Five, maybe more running in sequence.

You can see linear patterning that appears to be a lack of overlap of the cutters, running parallel to the board's length.

It's some funny to me, to see people spending a great deal of money on new construction, and then pay even more, to make it look like it was built by some clown that had only ever hacked out parts for barns or sheds in a hurry before.
 

Scottl

Diamond
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Location
Eastern Massachusetts, USA
I think that machine may be more complicated than meets the eye. At a feed rate of only 16 feet per minute, especially on the pine material that is shown, any normal moulder would burn the shit out of the wood. If the board shown was made in a single pass, which it probably was, you can see part of the 'lap' is clean and smooth which would indicate to me that it's actually the molder heads that may move up and down to create the 'hewn' effect, while the head to create the lap is stationary.

We ran a production Weinig moulder that was hot-rodded up to over 400 feet a minute on Redwood, and if that jammed for even a second, the heads would burn the material.

This is all speculation of course, but I will say that a feed rate of 16 feet a minute is like watching paint dry. Visualize a hand fed planer in a wood shop planing a 16' 1X6 and having to wait a full minute from start to finish!:eek:

Stuart

I can't help but wonder how many feet per minute a trained man with a sharp adze could produce. I read somewhere they used to stand with their feet in barrels just in case the adze skidded. Apparently they did work fast enough for it to be an issue.
 

duckfarmer27

Stainless
Joined
Nov 4, 2005
Location
Upstate NY
It's some funny to me, to see people spending a great deal of money on new construction, and then pay even more, to make it look like it was built by some clown that had only ever hacked out parts for barns or sheds in a hurry before.

I have to laugh at your comment, and tell a story on myself.

I'm 71. In high school and college I worked with a guy who was a one man contractor. Give him a hole in the ground and he'd build a house. But in the 7 years of summers with him we never did build a house - that's another long story. 6 years after my wife and I left town (got married a month after we graduated from college) and swore we would never come back we did return. So a year or so later we decided to build a house. I went and asked Clarence if he would want to tackle the job with me doing all I could nights and weekends - he was ready to retire but said he would like to build one more house. Hired my brother in law and his son to help get it closed in during the summer - son had inherited my job working with Clarence and brother in law was local shop teacher. Things went well and along about November one Saturday Clarence and I are working. My wife is the artist in the family - I'm an engineer with no sense of the finer things. I had cut old hand hewn beams out of the one barn falling down on the old family farm (our house was built in a corner of the farm). We wanted to put them on the ceiling in the family room/kitchen - non load bearing, just part of the decor. Before lunch I had said we really had to tackle them that afternoon - for some reason Clarence had seemed to be putting off doing that task with me, definitely a two man job. He went home for lunch - I ate my sandwich on site. When he came back in he was carrying a milking stool from the cow barn. He proceeded to smack it on the floor an told me that if we were going to build a new house but turn it into a barn he wanted to have an appropriate seat when he came to visit. That was his way of telling me I was crazy for installing those beams. He also did not help me in using old barn boards from the same barn to panel on either side of the fireplace. I learned a tremendous amount working all those years with Clarence. And every once in a while sitting in my chair I still smile, sitting under those beams we put up 43 years ago this month. I just wish Clarence was still around to come visit and sit on the milking stool.

Different ones of us see beauty in different ways. As varied as the world is that is probably a good thing.

Dale
 

DanielG

Stainless
Joined
Oct 22, 2014
Location
Maine
I can't help but wonder how many feet per minute a trained man with a sharp adze could produce. I read somewhere they used to stand with their feet in barrels just in case the adze skidded. Apparently they did work fast enough for it to be an issue.

In competitive lumberjack competitions, they wear chain mail socks/pants.
 

richard newman

Titanium
Joined
Jul 28, 2006
Location
rochester, ny
Different ones of us see beauty in different ways. As varied as the world is that is probably a good thing.

Dale

For sure! I still can't understand ripping a good pair of jeans into shreds before wearing them...

I've always thought that hand worked surfaces and rhythmic textures have much more charm than perfect machine made ones. I used to like to leave the wood hand planed or spoke shaved on my furniture, required really sharp tools and technique. But that fake barn beam stuff is the worst of both those worlds, pretty ugly to my eyes!
 

trevj

Titanium
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Interior British Columbia
I have to laugh at your comment, and tell a story on myself.

I'm 71. In high school and college I worked with a guy who was a one man contractor. Give him a hole in the ground and he'd build a house. But in the 7 years of summers with him we never did build a house - that's another long story. 6 years after my wife and I left town (got married a month after we graduated from college) and swore we would never come back we did return. So a year or so later we decided to build a house. I went and asked Clarence if he would want to tackle the job with me doing all I could nights and weekends - he was ready to retire but said he would like to build one more house. Hired my brother in law and his son to help get it closed in during the summer - son had inherited my job working with Clarence and brother in law was local shop teacher. Things went well and along about November one Saturday Clarence and I are working. My wife is the artist in the family - I'm an engineer with no sense of the finer things. I had cut old hand hewn beams out of the one barn falling down on the old family farm (our house was built in a corner of the farm). We wanted to put them on the ceiling in the family room/kitchen - non load bearing, just part of the decor. Before lunch I had said we really had to tackle them that afternoon - for some reason Clarence had seemed to be putting off doing that task with me, definitely a two man job. He went home for lunch - I ate my sandwich on site. When he came back in he was carrying a milking stool from the cow barn. He proceeded to smack it on the floor an told me that if we were going to build a new house but turn it into a barn he wanted to have an appropriate seat when he came to visit. That was his way of telling me I was crazy for installing those beams. He also did not help me in using old barn boards from the same barn to panel on either side of the fireplace. I learned a tremendous amount working all those years with Clarence. And every once in a while sitting in my chair I still smile, sitting under those beams we put up 43 years ago this month. I just wish Clarence was still around to come visit and sit on the milking stool.

Different ones of us see beauty in different ways. As varied as the world is that is probably a good thing.

Dale

Yep.

I dealt with a Blacksmith, who had spent a fair long time in the trade, and he shrugged his shoulders at the fascination with ugly beat to hell pieces of metal that he had to sell.

Said any Blacksmith worth the name would be ashamed to produce such crap, but if that was what the customer wanted, it sure cut down on the build time.

Saw similar sentiments expressed about Log Homes... Folks that were quite willing to live without things like running water and lights, because, well, it a Log Caybun, innit?
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2018
Location
Totalitarian Ruling Capital, EastAsia
Saw similar sentiments expressed about Log Homes... Folks that were quite willing to live without things like running water and lights, because, well, it a Log Caybun, innit?
The first time we went up the Alcan, some of the only places to stay were real log cabins. I swear the damn logs accelerate the wind speed through the gaps. We'd have been better off putting up the tent !

rishard newman said:
For sure! I still can't understand ripping a good pair of jeans into shreds before wearing them...
I have several very stylish pairs of jeans I'm not allowed to wear in public, but the Assistant can wear hers, cuz they're store-boughten :)
 

DDoug

Diamond
Joined
Oct 18, 2005
Location
NW Pa
I think that machine may be more complicated than meets the eye. At a feed rate of only 16 feet per minute, especially on the pine material that is shown, any normal moulder would burn the shit out of the wood. If the board shown was made in a single pass, which it probably was, you can see part of the 'lap' is clean and smooth which would indicate to me that it's actually the molder heads that may move up and down to create the 'hewn' effect, while the head to create the lap is stationary.

We ran a production Weinig moulder that was hot-rodded up to over 400 feet a minute on Redwood, and if that jammed for even a second, the heads would burn the material.

This is all speculation of course, but I will say that a feed rate of 16 feet a minute is like watching paint dry. Visualize a hand fed planer in a wood shop planing a 16' 1X6 and having to wait a full minute from start to finish!:eek:

Stuart

16 feet per minute....must be to keep from overloading the qty (15) HF $10 angle grinders making the gouges.....:D
22 Tooth Carving Disc
 

trevj

Titanium
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Interior British Columbia
16 feet per minute....must be to keep from overloading the qty (15) HF $10 angle grinders making the gouges.....:D
22 Tooth Carving Disc

Good Christ! Those can be got for way under $5 apiece direct outta China! Stihl, Husqvarna, Briggs & Stratton, Kohler, Tecumseh, Echo, Kawasaki, Honda, Robin, Yamaha, Wacker, Oleo Mac, Partner, Craftsman aftermarket Spare Parts Supplier

I'm not gonna say don't buy Made in China crap, but I WILL say, don't pay North American Retail for the same crap you can get for a very very small percentage of the local list price!

If yer gonna buy crap, really, be only willing to pay crap prices!
 

Spud

Diamond
Joined
Jan 12, 2006
Location
Brookfield, Wisconsin
The Craigslist add does not show pictures of the machine. Are those of you speaking about the technical aspects of the machine, trying to figure out what mechanisms would be needed based on the looks of the end product?
 








 
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