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Have you ever met a machinist that was better than you?

Not sure about that buddy...

I place mirrors all around the shop so I can see how good I look in my industrial jock strap/package protector. Safety and style all in one!

I sometime get lost in a trance by looking at that the sexy bastard in the mirror
I wink at my self every morning in the mirror while whistling Prince's "Sexy Motherfucker ". My wife just laughs and rolls her eyes at me. I roll them back and keep whistling.
 
Over 50 years I've worked with a few that were faster but mostly UK workers don't give a damn.
The ones who did enjoy running their machines fast and hard were very few and far between.
One company instally a big CNC lathe to machine steel gear blanks that had taken 3 hours - allowed 3 hours I should say - on old manual lathe.
We ran two shifts - one guy - the shop steward - took 3 hours on the new machine. other guy was a star machinist and could rip one out in about 30 minutes - including trepanning out the centers with a 125mm cutters at 750 rpm - as I stood well back!
Manaagement told workers to speed up so they went on strike.
Management sold out and 25% workers were made redundant!
I think the base problem in lack of dedication is the notion that getting work out fast just makes money for the bosses and distant shareholders.
I live in rust belt of UK from where machines and products flowed out around the world until 40 years ago. We made ships, planes, trains, you name it.
Now in my town the auto parts and special vehicles factory is now my supermarket.
And you get beaten at every game you invented by the countries you colonised. Well at least the sun is shining. Oh no I forgot the weather is always crap also. :D
 
Not sure about that buddy...

I place mirrors all around the shop so I can see how good I look in my industrial jock strap/package protector. Safety and style all in one!

I sometime get lost in a trance by looking at that the sexy bastard in the mirror
I used to work on a maintenance crew at a place and we had several half ton trucks that we used. There was one guy on the crew that if you got into a truck that he had just driven, the only thing you would see in all three mirrors was your own face.
 
I used to work on a maintenance crew at a place and we had several half ton trucks that we used. There was one guy on the crew that if you got into a truck that he had just driven, the only thing you would see in all three mirrors was your own face.

It's not our fault we're short!
 
Over 50 years I've worked with a few that were faster but mostly UK workers don't give a damn.
The ones who did enjoy running their machines fast and hard were very few and far between.
One company instally a big CNC lathe to machine steel gear blanks that had taken 3 hours - allowed 3 hours I should say - on old manual lathe.
We ran two shifts - one guy - the shop steward - took 3 hours on the new machine. other guy was a star machinist and could rip one out in about 30 minutes - including trepanning out the centers with a 125mm cutters at 750 rpm - as I stood well back!
Manaagement told workers to speed up so they went on strike.
Management sold out and 25% workers were made redundant!
I think the base problem in lack of dedication is the notion that getting work out fast just makes money for the bosses and distant shareholders.
I live in rust belt of UK from where machines and products flowed out around the world until 40 years ago. We made ships, planes, trains, you name it.
Now in my town the auto parts and special vehicles factory is now my supermarket.

The problem I see with the “go faster” mindset is that I have seen this first hand where everyone goes faster and there are no pay rises, no thank you, no pats on the back, no reward nothing. Nothing but the expectation to now maintain that speed for the same low pay and everyone gets burnt out and walks out because the jobs not going anywhere.
 
The problem I see with the “go faster” mindset is that I have seen this first hand where everyone goes faster and there are no pay rises, no thank you, no pats on the back, no reward nothing. Nothing but the expectation to now maintain that speed for the same low pay and everyone gets burnt out and walks out because the jobs not going anywhere.
You have to do what you consider good work ethics, always.
When I work somewhere I work hard and fast, if I am not rewarded for that over a period of time that is reasonable,
during an economic point where it is also reasonable(ie dont ask for a raise during a recession)
Then I leave and go somewhere else.

I don't start to do slower, uncaring, crappy work, what I'm saying is you do you, regardless of them, always work hard and fast.
If they don't reward you, leave, and take your ethic to the next guy to see if he rewards you.

More often than not I see people come up with usually false reasons to hate the place and the owner, and start to lower their work ethics,
this is an extremely bad deal, and all mostly negatively impacting the employee, So stupid stance to take, and most do!
 
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Well, I’m of the opinion almost anyone can offer something that anyone else can learn from. But that’s not necessarily “better”.

I’m gonna say I have worked with one machinist who is patently better than I. Had the same wide-ranging skillset but about 20 years more experience. I’ve worked with two that I’d consider comparable. And currently work with one who’s got a good leg up on me in the manual grinding world, can’t touch a CNC.

I love how good folks in this trade can have such a wide range of knowledge.
 
So I generally don't have much to add to these types of threads, but I'll say this: yes, I definitely have worked with guys better than me at times. Anyone who says they haven't is either joking, kidding themselves, or plain F.O.S.

I say this because at some point, there's always someone who has learned more than you, or done more than you, or has more experience than you, or is smarter than you, etc. Also because it's really pretty arrogant to answer that question with a no, and that ain't my style. As I gained more experience, I found that less and less coworkers were better than me, but that was simply due to my having more and more experience and the fact that I loved the trade so much that I was always on a path of continual improvement. I soak this stuff up like a sponge. Many people - no matter the trade - are, and do, not. In my experience, those who treat their trade purely as a 9 to 5 jail cell will likely never excel.

And really the only reason I'm even yet adding to this is because of William's comment. The fact that a certain employer doesn't pay as well as one might like is not a valid reason not to do one's best. A path of continual improvement means you should always do your utmost to learn and work efficiently. What should be done in such a case is to hand in your resignation and move somewhere that appreciates skill and hard work. Seek and ye shall find. I never had a problem finding places that would pay well. Occasionally I had to do a little looking, but making solid connections with other machinists at every place of employment made that a lot easier.
 








 
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