What's new
What's new

Help Diagnosing Apparent Z-Axis Drift

I'm also somewhat intentionally taking a lot of risks, I'm kinda of committed to not worrying about screwing up for now, figure I'll learn more in the long run.

And I do try hard to avoid crashes, that's the one thing.

So which one is it? :LOL:

We all always worry about crashes, and try to avoid.

"Do it slowly, correctly first, speed and efficiency will come with time"
 
Last edited:
Hahahaha.

Will be interesting to see just how many more times I burn my hand on the stove before going slowly
 
Adaptive toolpaths create an enormous amount of side pressure on the tool and they pull easily, I have pulled them out of top of the line Schunk hydraulic chucks. I would only use a milling chuck, or a side lock with a weldon flat on the cutting tool.
 
Adaptive toolpaths create an enormous amount of side pressure on the tool and they pull easily, I have pulled them out of top of the line Schunk hydraulic chucks. I would only use a milling chuck, or a side lock with a weldon flat on the cutting tool.
Also make sure you are completely on the flat. I once was on the edge of the flat and just caught the edge of the taper instead of the flat. once the tool started getting a good cut it vibrated off the taper and pulled out anyways.
 
Maybe time to revisit Clarkson style screwed shank cutters and holder concept. Pull out proof for sure.

Never bought in to the alleged imprecision in Z due to the collet self tightening if the collet slips. Cutter isn't going anywhere if it's hard on the central point. Neither is anything else if the casing nut is screwed down tight and bumped withe the spanner after insertion. But my straw poll said that most folk don't know how to install the cutter and tighten the holder correctly.

Theoretically too many loose parts for ideal concentricity perhaps.

Clive
 








 
Back
Top