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Hendey taper problem

ianb1268

Plastic
Joined
Apr 1, 2024
Location
Canada
From what I understand, Hendey horizontal mills used a Brown and Sharpe #10 taper. I have a collet holder with a #10 taper, however the taper in the machine is considerably larger. From measuring, it appears to actually be a #10 taper in the machine, just larger. Does anyone know if there was a sleeve that would have gone with the machine?
 
I had the same train of thought, large end is only 1.375”, too small for a #11.
 

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The arbor for the gear cutter fits, but I can’t figure out what the taper is. Specs don’t really match anything. Jarno #11 is close, but the taper specs don’t quite line up. You could be right, it might have been modified.
 
Thanks for everyone’s input, I really appreciate it. It looks like someone modified the original taper at some point according to the manuals. I would really love to bring this old machine back to life, would anyone have insight on a proper repair? I’m thinking a machine shop could make an oversized sleeve with a #10 taper, machine, and press it into the spindle.
 
Cut a National 40 taper in the spindle and move on. May not be able to put the driving keys on the face of the spindle and I wouldn't worry about it.
I had a old No. 3 B & S horizontale mill I converted it to a National 40 taper. It was so much easier to get tooling for it rather than dealing with obsolete B & S taper tooling.
Just my opinion. You have the right to do it however you like.
 
That’s really good advice, thanks. I like the idea of having readily available parts and the machine has already been modified.
 
Depending on your experience level and access to tooling you might be able to modify the spindle in your own shop using the machine its self .
If the spindle is soft enough you might be able to bore the taper with a long compound slide from a lathe mounted on the machine table set to the proper angle and use the table feed as the cross slide as if it were in a lathe.
You might have to evaluate a few things to be sure it would work before starting to cut.
If the bearings are in good shape and your boring tool was cutting well your reworked spindle would run true in the bearings.
If the spindle is hardened you could put a tool post grinder with an internal attachment on the compound slide and grind it to the new taper or even finish grind after boring with the earlier set up.
I think I saw a picture of this being done on a vertical mill in an older thread on this forum so it would be a matter of reconfiguring it for a horizontal.
Maybe someone else will remember that thread or have tried something similar.
I haven't tried this myself but have turned parts using a chuck mounted on a horizontal spindle and the tool turret mounted on the mill table.
John Oder showed some turning of large parts he did on one of his horizontal mills in an older thread too but I can't remember what one it was at the moment.
Jim
 
Depending on your experience level and access to tooling you might be able to modify the spindle in your own shop using the machine its self .
If the spindle is soft enough you might be able to bore the taper with a long compound slide from a lathe mounted on the machine table set to the proper angle and use the table feed as the cross slide as if it were in a lathe.
You might have to evaluate a few things to be sure it would work before starting to cut.
If the bearings are in good shape and your boring tool was cutting well your reworked spindle would run true in the bearings.
If the spindle is hardened you could put a tool post grinder with an internal attachment on the compound slide and grind it to the new taper or even finish grind after boring with the earlier set up.
I think I saw a picture of this being done on a vertical mill in an older thread on this forum so it would be a matter of reconfiguring it for a horizontal.
Maybe someone else will remember that thread or have tried something similar.
I haven't tried this myself but have turned parts using a chuck mounted on a horizontal spindle and the tool turret mounted on the mill table.
John Oder showed some turning of large parts he did on one of his horizontal mills in an older thread too but I can't remember what one it was at the moment.
Jim
Maybe here (scroll down enough to see "pictures" unencumbered by photobucket BS)
 
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I have a friend with a Garvin Mill, similar issue. A Seller's taper ended up fitting, so we made an adapter to go to B&S taper. Worked out well. It is hard to measure tapers, we ended up getting a few tapers together from fellow old machine guys and trying them. It becomes evident quickly what the taper is. I tiny diameter change makes a huge difference. I believe it was John O that mounted an existing taper in his lathe, used an indicator on the compound to zero the angle, remove the taper and turn a new one. Then it doesn't matter as much what it is, then it is correct.
Joe
 








 
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