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Hiring programmers for Fusion 360

F35Machinist

Aluminum
Joined
Nov 3, 2021
Location
California
I'm trying to hire a programmer. I use Fusion 360 primarily as my CAM software and HSMworks+Solidworks for offline parts (10% of all parts) at my shop. Every resume I've seen so far has Mastercam. I would rather not switch cam programs for the convenience of an employee. Does anyone else here have experience hiring people who know fusion 360? Is it really such a rare program to use?
 
What's the complexity level? Five axis or basic three axis? How good are you at training?

Could you sit them down during an interview, let them drive, open a sample file. Show them some of the Fusion navigation basics, show them how to pull one of your existing machine definitions and maybe set up a basic part? See how they adapt?

After enough CAD programs, we know it's a matter of finding where the buttons are hiding. Heck, I watched a Mastercam video the other day and they changed the interface again since my last update in 2016. I'd struggle with finding the buttons for the first hour or two and probably wouldn't interview well on a current seat.

I'm also blundering my way in the same direction (Mastercam to Fusion). While the subtleties might take some time to learn, the basics seem similar.
 
What's the complexity level? Five axis or basic three axis? How good are you at training?

Could you sit them down during an interview, let them drive, open a sample file. Show them some of the Fusion navigation basics, show them how to pull one of your existing machine definitions and maybe set up a basic part? See how they adapt?

After enough CAD programs, we know it's a matter of finding where the buttons are hiding. Heck, I watched a Mastercam video the other day and they changed the interface again since my last update in 2016. I'd struggle with finding the buttons for the first hour or two and probably wouldn't interview well on a current seat.

I'm also blundering my way in the same direction (Mastercam to Fusion). While the subtleties might take some time to learn, the basics seem similar.
Yes, it's all basically the same or very similar. I'd rather not train anyone or have them learn the ropes on my dime. If they are a fast learner they could make it work, but I've met enough slow learners to not want to risk it. Is it so much to ask for someone to just be able to do the job?
 
Unfortunately you are witnessing the difference between hype and reality. If you are looking for someone with years of real experience in industry you will find that most programmers will be working with something other than Fusion. Unfortunately social media presence and widgets made by home shop Harry etc don't cut the mustard when the rubber hits the road. Don't misunderstand me I know that you can do the high end work on Fusion I have a subscription myself. I just don't think that the market penetration is there yet in the real world.

Can you start someone on a base rate lower than what you would offer someone that is proficient with Fusion and give them a raise the moment that they are at the level required. If you can do this make sure that the goals and time frames to reach them are clearly identified.
 
I have taught well over a dozen MasterCAM programmers to use hyperMILL and/or Esprit over the years. For most, if they have a good understanding of how to make parts, which software they are driving is mostly unimportant.

I do understand that you don’t want to invest in training if this is a relatively low skill position. Just be aware that it is a massive red flag. Sometimes even a really kick-ass employee will take 6 months or more to find their groove in your environment. If you need (or expect) them to make money programming parts on day one, things are likely to sour very fast.
 
Does anyone else here have experience hiring people who know fusion 360? Is it really such a rare program to use?


Well, this is a first for sure ...
Do you also offer Bitcoin credit in lieu of a paycheck as well?


with
all
that
said ...

Most tech schools around here put otherwise clueless kids in front of a computer sporting Solidworks and Mastercam the second week into their curriculum, so hell, that resume may not mean dick anyway.
 
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For what its worth, Ive been on mastercam for a long time and the last shop I worked at had Fusion 360. I would say within a month, I had a pretty good grip on it. That is between youtube and talking to the other programmer when I was totally stuck. The big thing for me was learning how to model in Fusion, that took a minute coming from Mastercam but once it click I honestly liked it better. For toolpaths, it really wasnt a big deal coming from mastercam. And when I was on Fusion, I was programming for a 4 axis Okuma.
 
I gotta throw my 2 cents also, I can tell your frustrated but you built a shop around what started out as, and pretty much still is low cost hobby software.
So the people your gonna find probably know con-Fusion360, but their machinist skills are probably lacking, because for the most part its not used commercial/professionally.

I would be looking more towards instead of trying to find a con-Fusion guy, you look at changing to commercial software.

2 cents :cheers:
 
I think there either is going to be a little learning curve and quite a bit back and forth or you sit down face to face/ computer meeting and go over items. Items like how you like things programmed, your standards (in quality and process), what a sample program you have looks like. Besides whether they are trained in Fusion or not, every programmer programs different and needs to have a feel for the machines and tooling.
 
I learned on Gibbs and switched to Fusion when I went on my own, maybe a month or so to get used to it, by month 4 I preferred it and way faster at it. I can't imagine Mastercam is so completely alien from Fusion.
 
Do you have many applicants? If so, I might recommend something I have done (similar). Tell them in a phone interview they will need to run 360 and will be asked to at least see what they can figure out in 30min on a simple 3 axis part.

What does it prove? How many are willing to try to figure it out on their own dime/time, and who accels on the curve. I've also had those that will accept any tool path as "programmed". I send those to the bottom. If they can't understand a quality path, they are a video game programmer and nothing more. No machine experience, bye!

But I will say as a top of biz guy, I personally would not see this as a career path if I had invested a lot in learning MC. Not saying it can't work but be prepared for people to either not want to test, or leave soon. Just because they want to further their career options on your dime with MC.
 
Yes, it's all basically the same or very similar. I'd rather not train anyone or have them learn the ropes on my dime. If they are a fast learner they could make it work, but I've met enough slow learners to not want to risk it. Is it so much to ask for someone to just be able to do the job?
This is the problem with the entire indistey right here.
Sorry to say man.

you want someone experienced and your willing to take them away from someone who spent there dime without you depositing into the talent pool.

When my son is done a bath I ask if he wants to say goodby to the little tornado. And we watch as the water goes down and down. And the tornado gets smaller and smaller. Soon there’s nothing left.

Alternatively.
Why don’t you hire 3 and fire 2 every 2 months
Do this for 2 years and you will have a strong staff in a few years.
Point them to the resources and pay well. The ones with Drive and desire will prevail.
 
I'd be looking for a machinist who has experience with a few different cam softwares. I started on Gibbs, went to esprit, then to fusion and have now started learning some older versions of mastercam. I would think I am not an anomaly in that if you can figure out a couple of different software work flows, then Fusion will be very easy to pick up.

When I started at my current position, we had Mastercam and Fusion. I chose to learn Fusion first and though I hate the drawing portion(Esprit was super easy) the Fusion cam software was so easy to learn I was fully confident in programs after a couple of weeks. Fusion has the benefit of free training as well online so there are no excuses for a new hire to not learn the software quickly. It's not perfect but it is simple enough that any competent programmer/Machinist should be able to pick it up damn quick.

Maybe adjust the job posting to Fusion experience preferred or alternatively 5 plus year of equivalent programming experience ?
 
Did you mention Fusion in your job listing?

If so, and none of the applicants updated their resumes to include "Some experience with Fusion", then they're all a bunch of fucking idiots anyway. Keep looking.

If this were NX or Catia, then it would be understandable. No excuse for Fusion. It's free to download and any competent programmer would be able to learn the basics in a matter of hours. Not days or weeks.
 
I use Fusion for mill and lathe
I demo'd Mastercam and OneCNC also
If I got Mastercam I would have picked it up fairly quick, as others mentioned it's a matter of knowing the shortcuts, buttons and order of operations
I would think a Mastercam expert could jump to Fusion quickly
A shop I almost went to uses Fusion exclusively, they do about $5M in revenue
 








 
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