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HLV Value?

Deerhurst

Aluminum
Joined
Jun 6, 2022
I'm looking at a HLV a buddy has. Comes with an Aloris tool post clone, 3 and 4 jaw chucks, collets, collet closer, centers for the tailstock, and pretty much anything else he can stumble across for it. It was completely torn down and rebuild and painted with the ways re-scraped. Has an electrical issue where it won't run. He has never run it. I found him a HLV-H so he doesn't need this little guy.

What is a fair price for this machine considering we don't know exactly what the electrical issue is? I'm thinking it's no control voltage by his description of it does nothing.
 
Twenty one years ago I saw a completely restored HLV-H for $22,000 which include a broker fee.
At the same place I saw a new looking HLV for $10,000. When I asked about the HLV the broker said how about $8,000.
 
I'm looking at a HLV a buddy has. Comes with an Aloris tool post clone, 3 and 4 jaw chucks, collets, collet closer, centers for the tailstock, and pretty much anything else he can stumble across for it. It was completely torn down and rebuild and painted with the ways re-scraped. Has an electrical issue where it won't run. He has never run it. I found him a HLV-H so he doesn't need this little guy.

What is a fair price for this machine considering we don't know exactly what the electrical issue is? I'm thinking it's no control voltage by his description of it does nothing.
If it's complete with a taper attachment, steady and follower rests, and no bearing or belt issues (hard to assess without it running), no appreciable runout on the saddle, cross-slide, or compound, I'd say you've got a $16,000+ machine, without the electrical issue. You've got to assess the potential electrical issues (likely contactor problems). Can you diagnose the electrical issue, or must you pay someone? Is the schematic included in the electrical box, and does anything look "fried" in the box? What year is the machine (look up the serial #)? IMHO, you're in the $10K+ range, to be fair to your buddy.
 
I saw the statement, "ways re-scraped" and wondered if that meant the hardened steel bed, which has to be re-ground. A worn bed makes the lathe worth very little and costs a great deal to properly correct.

And I wonder if all the people reading this understand that the HLV was built between 1950 and 1960, before the improved design HLV-H replaced it. There were also some design improvements in the HLV between 1950 and 1960, so later is better.

Larry
 
I forgot to mention that I saw a HLV-H at a local auction that closed in June 2022 in Richmond, VA, sell for $17,853.40 less the 18% commission. It was a 1980s machine with a brand new six-jaw Buck chuck and several accessories. However, there was 20+ thousanths run-out on the cross slide alone. It's possible to take up some of that by adjusting the brass nut, but, who knows?
 

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I saw the statement, "ways re-scraped" and wondered if that meant the hardened steel bed, which has to be re-ground. A worn bed makes the lathe worth very little and costs a great deal to properly correct.

And I wonder if all the people reading this understand that the HLV was built between 1950 and 1960, before the improved design HLV-H replaced it. There were also some design improvements in the HLV between 1950 and 1960, so later is better.

Larry
Ground world be more accurate. It was supposed to be his shop lathe but we found him a HLV-H plus a ton of tooling and a Hardinge mill for less than you guys are saying a HLV is worth.

He wants way less than any of the numbers being thrown out. It's a much better machine than I have now. I'm sure I can get the electrical figured out and if not I work with brilliant electrical engineers that love old equipment like this.

It's in another state so I can't just hop on over and play with it. Originally I was doing to get it running for him anyways.

I don't think it has the taper attachment. I could be wrong.
 
I forgot to mention that I saw a HLV-H at a local auction that closed in June 2022 in Richmond, VA, sell for $17,853.40 less the 18% commission. It was a 1980s machine with a brand new six-jaw Buck chuck and several accessories. However, there was 20+ thousanths run-out on the cross slide alone. It's possible to take up some of that by adjusting the brass nut, but, who knows?
If runout was supposed to be backlash, there is a little plug in the top of the nut than can be driven down against the feed screw threads to affect backlash. Looks kind of lame to me. Better to install a new nut and use the drill and tap kit to thread it in place if the backlash needs to be reduced. I have two blank nuts and the tool kit to thread them, but have never used them.

Larry

LH0000328S Nut Cross Slide Sales Kit.JPG
 
Hi Larry, are you interested in selling those extra nuts and the kit? I have many HLV-H extras and parts for a trade or a mix? Best, Mike DiGirolamo
 
I wish I had a buddy like yours...:

"He wants way less than any of the numbers being thrown out. It's a much better machine than I have now. I'm sure I can get the electrical figured out and if not I work with brilliant electrical engineers that love old equipment like this. "
 
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Hi Larry, are you interested in selling those extra nuts and the kit? I have many HLV-H extras and parts for a trade or a mix? Best, Mike DiGirolamo
You can buy the HLV-H nuts and tap set from Hardinge. The nuts are $998 each and you have to ask about the tap set price. They may loan the tools against a returnable cash deposit when you buy a nut, but you have to call and ask them if they still do it that way. That was how they sold blank nuts and loaned tap sets for the 1946 model slide rests back in the 1980's when I did some rebuilds.


I have two blank nut assemblies, three taps, two bushings, two tap drills, one center drill and one knockout bar plus the instruction sheet. In other words, one complete set plus extra parts. Note the taps are special for this purpose and have the Hardinge part number.

I am open to a cash offer for these items, but no trades.

Larry

LH328S kit 1.JPG
 
There is a black mushroom shaped button on the headstock to lock the spindle, if it is depressed even a tiny bit it kills the machine, make sure it is pulled all the way out before you go chasing electrical trouble.
 
There is a black mushroom shaped button on the headstock to lock the spindle, if it is depressed even a tiny bit it kills the machine, make sure it is pulled all the way out before you go chasing electrical trouble.
On the HLV-H it works a switch as well as the mechanical lock. On the HLV, It's just a mechanical lock.
 
Confirmed, bed was removed and originally had a 0.002 belly in it, which was removed. I'm told it got +0.0015 bearings installed and the saddle has be re-ground.

I'm going to snag it. Too good of a deal to pass up and it is so much better than what I have now.
 
I have an HLV and an HLV-H and a Taiwan clone and they are all very nice machines. I think the wider bed and beefier headstock on the H models makes it a tiny bit more rigid but it might be my imagination. There are not many lathes that compare to a Hardinge and it will be a pleasure for you to use.
 
Purchased my first HLV-H in 2018, for $3800. It was in rough shape, not many for sale in Colorado. Some of the repair shops stock pile the one the do come up for sale. I ended up replacing leadscrew and nut, along with the rack and gear.

To do a full rebuild Harding quoted me $55K in 2019. Paul Babin quoted $25K, Paul is second generation behind his dad. He's help me a lot with small stuff and has been good to deal with. I am sure there are some on here that don't care for him. But there is probably as many that don't care for Hardinge and their pricing as well. Monarch isn't much different on pricing. Sub Tool just put in a big Masak, it required a 5' reinforced floor installed and took like 3 months to assemble. Not to state the obvious but anything related is off the chart expensive.
 
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I spent in the arena of $20k for an early 2000s creampuff HLV-EM. I personally wouldn’t pay more than that, but sometimes the absolutely perfect ones go for $35k or so. The only way I’d sink more money into it is if Paul Babin rebuilt it, but it’s more than good enough for me.

For an HLV (not H or EM) I’d have a really hard time putting more than $8-$10k into it but that’s just me. It’s a very old lathe.
 
Got my late model EM for 5.5 in minty condition and come across them from time to time for less than 10.

If folks are paying 10+ for these lathes, maybe I should start selling them 😂
 
You can buy the HLV-H nuts and tap set from Hardinge. The nuts are $998 each and you have to ask about the tap set price. They may loan the tools against a returnable cash deposit when you buy a nut, but you have to call and ask them if they still do it that way. That was how they sold blank nuts and loaned tap sets for the 1946 model slide rests back in the 1980's when I did some rebuilds.


I have two blank nut assemblies, three taps, two bushings, two tap drills, one center drill and one knockout bar plus the instruction sheet. In other words, one complete set plus extra parts. Note the taps are special for this purpose and have the Hardinge part number.

I am open to a cash offer for these items, but no trades.

Larry

View attachment 402068
Larry are any of the taps square thread?
The cross slide leadscrew on my HLV is a square thread.

Kiwi
 
To do a full rebuild Harding quoted me $55K in 2019. Paul Babin quoted $25K, Paul is second generation behind his dad. He's help me a lot with small stuff and has been good to deal with. I am sure there are some on here that don't care for him. But there is probably as many that don't care for Hardinge and their pricing as well. Monarch isn't much different on pricing. Sub Tool just put in a big Masak, it required a 5' reinforced floor installed and took like 3 months to assemble. Not to state the obvious but anything related is off the chart expensive.

I don't think I have ever heard anyone say anything bad about Babin Machine:

Al Babin or Ali Babin or whatever name by this week is a notoriously slimy dealer out of the southern CT.
 








 
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