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How deep should I bore soft jaws?

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plus you can get to the whole shaft, all at once ... okay, not the ends, but all the rest.
 
I see a lot of Rohm face drivers in auto making of transmission shafts and such.
We modify the steel ones and put carbide on the end.
When dull knock off the carbide ring, braze on a new one and cut new teeth.
The thing with all face drivers is that your first cut needs to be towards the chuck and heavy to get it to "bite and seat" well.
Tail stock pressure alone does not seem to have enough force. Yes the advertising says other but if you want to push some power you need to seat it hard.
As stated the advantage is that you can turn the entire shaft all in one clamp and even put a chamfer on the chuck end.
All these cuts will run true to each other since there is only one chucking.
They leave a sort of "star" pattern of lines indented and burred on the chuck end of the part.
 

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I guess the concept has been in use with wood turning lathes since the year dot. Never would have thought to use it for metal turning. I've got a project that could benefit on the HLV. Probably have to make one, but it'll make the turning job simpler.
 
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I've been intrigued by face drivers but never used one. My feeling is they are better suited to higher production than 10 or 20 pieces.

Surely cutting depth must be kept small. If the part ever spins you'll have a mess on yours hands, and very quick!
 
I've been intrigued by face drivers but never used one. My feeling is they are better suited to higher production than 10 or 20 pieces.

Surely cutting depth must be kept small. If the part ever spins you'll have a mess on yours hands, and very quick!
That just is not true at all. If I had 5 shafts that can be turned between centers
I would do it. Everything runs together, it is a no brainer.
I ran an older Mazak that took 1/4" deep cuts. Try it, then judge it.
 
That just is not true at all. If I had 5 shafts that can be turned between centers I would do it.
The only problem I've run into is, if there's not enough material on the end to get a bite. Like, say there's a 25 mm bearing seat on the end of the part, and a 3/8" hole an inch deep or something, the wall is pretty thin without much room for the teeth.
 
The downside to a shallow jaw depth is you can really load the jaw bolts if you have a little chuck with the pressure cranked up. So you turn the pressure down appropriately.

The upside is you can get more of the part and between centers the part finds it's home better- Long jaw engagement means the jaws are heavily influencing the alignment of the other end of the part.
 
I've been intrigued by face drivers but never used one. My feeling is they are better suited to higher production than 10 or 20 pieces.

Surely cutting depth must be kept small. If the part ever spins you'll have a mess on yours hands, and very quick
Not really. The biggest mistake I have seen people make is going too slow being too cautious. Another is make sure you tailstock pressure is set for the cut and the finish part. I once had to remove a lot of stock and by the time it was done the pressure was too much. Made a recurve rod completely unintentionally lol.
 








 
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