What's new
What's new

How fast can I feed with a carbide slitting saw without a keyway?

Jrill

Aluminum
Joined
Feb 11, 2013
Location
Northeast USA
I bought a Maritool Carbide Slitting Saw 3.5 X 1.0 X 5/32, 64 staggered tooth TiALN,

bought it for an aluminum 6061 job with slots 0.250 deep.

I'm used to HSS slitting saws with keyways so I'm wondering how fast you guys are feeding keyless saws in the wild.

Also read something about using loctite on the saw/arbor to keep it in place a little better? Any other tips appreciated
 
Straight from Maritool slitting saw page:

Jeweler and slitting saws are designed for slotting and grooving thin material in which minimum tooth engagement is desired. Applications include making slits for collets, cutting wire, tubing, sheeting and extrusions. These saws are excellent for being used as a cutoff tool in lathes with live tooling. Parts will have a much smaller tit if not supported and since these saws are thin you can get more pieces per bar. Large number of teeth will give you great metal removal rates and tool life.

  • In all cases flood coolant is always best
  • Generally most feed per tooth recommendations are .0002" - .0013" per tooth
  • If saw is coated and or staggered tooth, feed per tooth may be increased
  • If material is tough or hard or saw is very thin feed must be reduced
  • If machine spindle torque is low or rigidity feed must be reduced
  • If saw is especially thin or cutting deep feed must be reduced
  • RPM for mild steels 200 sfpm, med alloy steels 160 sfpm, high alloy 120 sfpm, high temp alloys 80 sfpm
  • Aluminum 500-900 sfpm, copper 250-600 sfpm, cast iron 160-250 sfpm
  • In general it is best not to have a single depth of cut more than 2 times the saw thickness
  • If total depth of cut is more than 6 times the saw thickness it is best to use staggered tooth
  • If you dont see a size or style that you need email us. We can quote customs and even stock them for you. Typical lead times are 2-3 weeks.
 
Biggest issue is normally when the material closes on the blade and grips it.
 
I run a staggered tooth 1/16 carbide saw (from Maritool) and run it normally at 1547 RPM and 12IPM through aluminum as deep as I can go. A bit slow but I've run hundreds of parts with this same formula without any issues. I run much faster (RPM and feed) in plastic and much slower RPM in 17-4 stainless. Maritool's SFPM suggestions are a great starting point.
 
Staggered teeth can help a lot! increased chip evacuation and reduces the force needed to cut into the material.

For aluminum specific applications we have made uncoated staggered tooth saws with less teeth as well.
 
Staggered teeth can help a lot! increased chip evacuation and reduces the force needed to cut into the material.

For aluminum specific applications we have made uncoated staggered tooth saws with less teeth as well.

Was I dreaming or did I sense a pull in the force as you were finalizing the design for the flush mount saws 😉
 
I don't think that saw is going to work out for you in aluminum. I bought a similar one from Maritool and it loads up with aluminum from anything but the lightest cuts.

A side chip saw is the way to go. The coolant can get into the cut and there's plenty of chip clearance. Side chip saws are the best for plastic as well because the material won't pinch the saw blade and snap it.
 








 
Back
Top