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How to use a probe on cnc mill

I get why you did this...sort of. I got sick of jogging my probe to all the different spots before running the probing routines in MDI. I spent maybe 30 minutes writing a macro that I now place at the beginning of every program. It sets my work offset (usually) within about 0.003" of actual, and then I copy and paste probe routines into the program and push play. Hand jogging the probe into a part, even slowly, increases the chances of damaging a probe significantly, and sort of redundant. At that point you might as well spin an edge finder and go that route, no?
We did this because the probe routines would not run correctly in MDI. No issues on our Haas or DMG's just the Mazak. I figured out a work around until the company could call Mazak and well since It was working they kept kicking the can down the road about calling Mazak. I was still waiting when I left. Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution that works. If I would have threw my hands up in the air and said hell if I know, they may have actually got the machine fixed.
 
We did this because the probe routines would not run correctly in MDI. No issues on our Haas or DMG's just the Mazak. I figured out a work around until the company could call Mazak and well since It was working they kept kicking the can down the road about calling Mazak. I was still waiting when I left. Nothing is as permanent as a temporary solution that works. If I would have threw my hands up in the air and said hell if I know, they may have actually got the machine fixed.
no good deed goes unpunished
 
Most of the jobs I either put in the vise or larger jobs I just blot right on the table. I've been either using an edge finder or with round jobs that need a bolt circle drilled I just put an indicator on the spindle and dial a part in like would in a 4 jaw chuck and zero both x and y. Then program from the center. I can be running a part in 5 min including making the program. Doesn't sound like a probe would be much faster if you have to program the probe. I can see where it would be great for multiple parts in a fixture.
 
Most of the jobs I either put in the vise or larger jobs I just blot right on the table. I've been either using an edge finder or with round jobs that need a bolt circle drilled I just put an indicator on the spindle and dial a part in like would in a 4 jaw chuck and zero both x and y. Then program from the center. I can be running a part in 5 min including making the program. Doesn't sound like a probe would be much faster if you have to program the probe. I can see where it would be great for multiple parts in a fixture.
Where our probes was really handy was the variation we got on fired size of the ceramic parts we made. they could vary in length up too .300 according to where they was fired in the kiln. Different zones had different shrinkage it could be 20 to 30 percent based on what zone. With the probe I could set it to measure a web to find center of the part and mill of everything around it to the correct size. I can do the same with an indicator, but the probe was much quicker. The other way they was a benefit was we checked some parts on the machine before we pulled them out using the probe. we could set it to rerun features that was oversized after automatically making an offset adjustment based on the data received from the probe. Also we done tool breakage with tool families set up to use multiple tools of the same size and grit. Real handy when you have 8 mills you run by yourself on 3rd shift and you are in the middle of setting up one of the 8 and a tool breaks on one of the others. Ceramic is a PITA to work with you are basically grinding one rock with another rock and the parts could take an entire shift to make 1 or even longer.
 
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I wouldn't want to MDI a probe cycle anyways, as likely to crash a probe jogging it around as you are from fat-fingering a wrong decimal...
Have your most common probe cycles saved as discrete programs and keep them on the machine; If most everything you make is from bar stock you only need one program that touches the top and then the four sides to touch off on rectangle and round bars. This is all that the Haas "manual" probing routines do just with a friendly GUI on top.
 








 
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