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How would YOU clamp this part down?

haha that's funny, because it's partly true. however, this bike is special to me, It was a looooong project I completely built from the ground up over 8 years. I purchased each and every component specifically, lots of goodies...Brembo, Ohlins, all bolts/axles Titanium, Carbon, Slipper Clutch. Nothing is stock on this bike, so I want to do it right, even the little things like this. View attachment 383391

Funny, mine was similar in almost every way, even down to the rust on the iron rotors. I'm guessing you got iron ones. I didn't do a slipper though. I gave up on it after sending on on a corner, after that its too expensive to maintain bring back to stock. Best investment was getting a second hand track bike R6, could care less if anything broke or got knocked over.
 
It looks like the section you're drilling is from a casting, and then presumably the assembly was heat treated after final welding. I'd be cautious about thread rolling the part, especially after the comment about some developing cracks.

A cut thread, while in theory less strong, could minimize the hoop stress that could initiate a crack. I'd then use a Loctite to help secure the fastener and keep out moisture to prevent corrosion.

Just my two lira (pre-Euro).
 
Funny, mine was similar in almost every way, even down to the rust on the iron rotors. I'm guessing you got iron ones. I didn't do a slipper though. I gave up on it after sending on on a corner, after that its too expensive to maintain bring back to stock. Best investment was getting a second hand track bike R6, could care less if anything broke or got knocked over.
Yup, Braketech iron axis rotors, a pain but man I love my brake setup!
I agree though, I miss my R6’s and I think they are the perfect track bike, for the cost and fun factor.

It looks like the section you're drilling is from a casting, and then presumably the assembly was heat treated after final welding. I'd be cautious about thread rolling the part, especially after the comment about some developing cracks.

A cut thread, while in theory less strong, could minimize the hoop stress that could initiate a crack. I'd then use a Loctite to help secure the fastener and keep out moisture to prevent corrosion.

Just my two lira (pre-Euro).
Great comments, thank you! I will have to look into that further. I do have an M12 cut tap as well but it’s not a bottoming tap, which I’d prefer here, so may need to pick one of those up to have on hand.
And yes, either way loctite will be used, which I do on just about every fastener on the bike. Probably orange, I’ve been a big fan of orange lately instead of blue, when red is not needed.
 
FirstAsent, Know that a hollow part can crush/distort with too much pressure applied by hold downs. Filling/bracing the hollow/cavity is a common technic using some kind of stack-up inside the part perhaps with JoBlocks, mill jacks. or a bolt with a nut.. it is not uncommon to brace the table side of a part with some T bolt held whatevers for block-ins so such a part can not move, or spin with the rotation of a drill bit. a tap or the pressure of a cutter, with a just-touch-the-part and bolt down the down the device.

With using block-ins the need for high hold-down pressure is reduced, like having a spin-stop on a drill press table.

A push/ pull, or a light hammer tap can often tell you the set-up is secure.
Buck
PS>
qt: ( I do have an M12 cut tap as well but it’s not a bottoming tap, which I’d prefer0
Good to try to get a full nut of threads here, perhaps 7 to10 turns if you can get it
 
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FirstAsent, Know that a hollow part can crush/distort with too much pressure applied by hold downs. Filling/bracing the hollow/cavity is a common technic using some kind of stack-up inside the part perhaps with JoBlocks, mill jacks. or a bolt with a nut.. it is not uncommon to brace the table side of a part with some T bolt held whatevers for block-ins so such a part can not move, or spin with the rotation of a drill bit. a tap or the pressure of a cutter, with a just-touch-the-part and bolt down the down the device.
I agree. Anybody starting out needs to realise that the job can move in other ways than just up and down. Using slot stops and slot pushers is another way of holding components in place.

Regards Tyrone.
 
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FirstAsent, Know that a hollow part can crush/distort with too much pressure applied by hold downs. Filling/bracing the hollow/cavity is a common technic using some kind of stack-up inside the part perhaps with JoBlocks, mill jacks. or a bolt with a nut.. it is not uncommon to brace the table side of a part with some T bolt held whatevers for block-ins so such a part can not move, or spin with the rotation of a drill bit. a tap or the pressure of a cutter, with a just-touch-the-part and bolt down the down the device.

With using block-ins the need for high hold-down pressure is reduced, like having a spin-stop on a drill press table.

A push/ pull, or a light hammer tap can often tell you the set-up is secure.
Buck
PS>
qt: ( I do have an M12 cut tap as well but it’s not a bottoming tap, which I’d prefer0
Good to try to get a full nut of threads here, perhaps 7 to10 turns if you can get it
Yes thanks! I was planning on securing it rotationally/side to side as well and not just up and down. I’m still deciding how, but I did think about that too.

That won’t be an issue getting enough threads for this area, the existing threaded hole has about that many threads and I’ll be able to go just as deep in the new hole, thank you for pointing it out though
 
I would be making a test hole in similar material and checking the hole size and form tap. Your 11.5mm drill is at the bottom end of the spec for form taps, like 57.5%.
One would assume that for a caliper mounting bolt a 65% thread engagement would be better.
You may want to investigate further and find out the spec for the original hole and thread. (Given your desire to “do it right“ on this project)

Good luck
 
The ability to set jobs up on the table as opposed to just putting everything in a vice is an essential skill for a machinist. When you’ve mastered that skill not much will cause you problems. Having a decent small clamping kit with clamps, screwed rods, tee nuts, washers and nuts etc plus parallels and shims, small screw jacks is essential.

Regards Tyrone.
I'll add a detail to above; investing reasonable amounts on specialized tooling can only expand your flexibility. How often you foretell use hinges on having Item X available. Clamping is flexible enough that single use is unlikely. Can't get anywhere without clamping gear and various spacers; soon as you're challenged by contours, draft angles, whatever, hemispherical washers will be worth their weight in unobtanium.
 
I would be making a test hole in similar material and checking the hole size and form tap. Your 11.5mm drill is at the bottom end of the spec for form taps, like 57.5%.
One would assume that for a caliper mounting bolt a 65% thread engagement would be better.
You may want to investigate further and find out the spec for the original hole and thread. (Given your desire to “do it right“ on this project)

Good luck
Yes I fully intend to test multiple holes in aluminum.
You have a good point on the drill size. 11.5 was the “recommended” size for a M12x1.25 form tap on multiple charts/sites I looked up. So using that as a starting point, but yes I’d prefer a good thread engagement.
I’m happy to get and test on multiple drill sizes, thanks I’ll have to do some more digging on that.

As far as getting more info on the spec for the original hole and thread, that’s next to impossible as factories (Ducati in this case) do not release that type of info.

With that being said, it’s important to note that yes although it is for a caliper mount, it isn’t load bearing, it only serves as assisting with alignment as it rotates in the eccentric hub
 
I'll add a detail to above; investing reasonable amounts on specialized tooling can only expand your flexibility. How often you foretell use hinges on having Item X available. Clamping is flexible enough that single use is unlikely. Can't get anywhere without clamping gear and various spacers; soon as you're challenged by contours, draft angles, whatever, hemispherical washers will be worth their weight in unobtanium.
Yes a highly agree with this, and I’m all for investing in quality components/fixtures/tooling. I have a few orange vises but outside of clamping something in a vise, my options are very limited at this time. But that’s ok, gotta start somewhere, and now I can work on building up my tooling :)
The problem there is there are SO many options (which is also good), so I’m trying to decide what might be more versatile then get into the more unique items
 
Yes a highly agree with this, and I’m all for investing in quality components/fixtures/tooling. I have a few orange vises but outside of clamping something in a vise, my options are very limited at this time. But that’s ok, gotta start somewhere, and now I can work on building up my tooling :)
The problem there is there are SO many options (which is also good), so I’m trying to decide what might be more versatile then get into the more unique items
You can do most things with the basic clamping kit that has been discussed earlier. You need to be aware that you can’t just clamp away with no regard to where the forces are going . You don‘t want to crush or distort the component.

A pal of mine had a “ Ducati Monster “. I remember seeing him ride into town to go to the bank . I/2 mile journey. Half an hour later he came back walking. The bike had been stolen in broad daylight in a busy town at 12-30pm. He locked it to a barrier under closed circuit TV cameras but the cameras turned out not to be working ! He wa only in the bank for 10 minutes.

Regards Tyrone.
 
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You can do most things with the basic clamping kit that has been discussed earlier. You need to be aware that you can’t just clamp away with no regard to where the forces are going . You don‘t want to crush or distort the component.

A pal of mine had a “ Ducati Monster “. I remember seeing him ride into town to go to the bank . I/2 mile journey. Half an hour later he came back walking. The bike had been stolen in broad daylight in a busy town at 12-30pm. He locked it to a barrier under closed circuit TV cameras but the cameras turned out not to be working ! He wa only in the bank for 10 minutes.

Regards Tyrone.
Oh yes I totally understand you can’t just go crazy on the clamping! But I also understand my hands on knowledge is new and there’s a lot I don’t know and need to learn.
I at least have a decent idea though and am used to working in various industries (automotive/motorcycles, industrial controls, solar, process/electrical engineering, etc), I’m also very particular in how I assemble things and I enjoy little things even such as proper torque of bolts. I even have a couple screwdriver torque sets :)

so I have a broad background base, just little specific experience, so far, in fixturing/clamping/cnc.

and wow! That so unfortunate about your buddy, it’s crazy how fast that stuff can happen.
 








 
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