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I am at my supplier today paying $48/bd ft for 4/4 teak.

I saw the Teak prices at the yard the other day, $42/bdft here... nutso.

Good thing Cherry is still cheap! $5 bdft here.
 
I think i buy *exotics where you do.
Even a few years ago, Teak for a tiny restoration project at Dumbarton Oaks seemed outrageous. Even worse was curly Koa. ($80-ish/BF, IIRC) with enough area to select & cut matched repair pieces from. OTOH, it was a nice job.

*except when Richard is being generous. :)
He might still have some teak, then there's shipping.

smt
 
My brother the auto mechanic gave my wood working brother a crate a chain hoist came in. The hoist was war surplus evacuated from the Philippines right before Japan invaded. The crate was made of 2x4 and 2x6 teak. Clear knot free old growth.
Bill D
 
I think i buy *exotics where you do.
Even a few years ago, Teak for a tiny restoration project at Dumbarton Oaks seemed outrageous. Even worse was curly Koa. ($80-ish/BF, IIRC) with enough area to select & cut matched repair pieces from. OTOH, it was a nice job.

*except when Richard is being generous. :)
He might still have some teak, then there's shipping.

smt
Years ago I was buying for a guitar manufacturer, from General Hardwoods in Seattle- they had stacks of 8/4 curly koa 20 foot high. I am down to a couple guitars and some furniture made from it and that is it. The wood is probably worth more than the furniture.....
I did one yacht interior from Koa, fancy molded console, doors and cabinetry.
 
At work we just replaced the teak deck caulking on a 100ft yacht, a few of the deck boards got damaged in the process. Our wood finish guy told me the replacement boards were $250 each. They were about 2"x1/2"x8'
 
I remember going down to Wm Marshall, at the docks in Brooklyn. What a buffet of great wood. Brazilian RW was $3/ft, but I couldn't afford it, bought E. Indian instead. Big mistake! They had Ceylon satinwood, 22' x 24"w, English Brown Oak, Swiss Pearwood, Andaman Padauk etc. Big boards, beautiful stock. Those days are so gone!
 
I remember going down to Wm Marshall, at the docks in Brooklyn. What a buffet of great wood. Brazilian RW was $3/ft, but I couldn't afford it, bought E. Indian instead. Big mistake! They had Ceylon satinwood, 22' x 24"w, English Brown Oak, Swiss Pearwood, Andaman Padauk etc. Big boards, beautiful stock. Those days are so gone!
Yeah,
Koa was so cheap I made a french fit dial indicator box from it..cute little box with stand, clamps etc.
Way back in the day a friend had a BR 60's D-28 martin and was telling me how they did not use it any more, they switched to EI rosewood- did not think much of it at the time, but should have.
A little pocket yacht operation I worked for was using teak faced plywood for bulkheads,
The stuff was 3/4" thick, 13 ! lamination's, and had that old growth Burmese teak for veneers- the stuff with dramatic dark brown and black streaking over the golden colored background. In the mid '70's it was $100 a sheet.
 
I remember going down to Wm Marshall, at the docks in Brooklyn. What a buffet of great wood. Brazilian RW was $3/ft, but I couldn't afford it, bought E. Indian instead. Big mistake! They had Ceylon satinwood, 22' x 24"w, English Brown Oak, Swiss Pearwood, Andaman Padauk etc. Big boards, beautiful stock.

Years ago I was buying for a guitar manufacturer, from General Hardwoods in Seattle- they had stacks of 8/4 curly koa 20 foot high. I am down to a couple guitars and some furniture made from it and that is it. The wood is probably worth more than the furniture..........
.........pocket yacht operation I worked for was using teak faced plywood for bulkheads,
The stuff was 3/4" thick, 13 ! lamination's, and had that old growth Burmese teak for veneers- the stuff with dramatic dark brown and black streaking over the golden colored background.

The really scary thing is that there probably are still lumber yards just like those of memory above. With exotics in large sizes that are illegal to import into US. Also including domestic lumber that we can barely buy in the states anymore, like instrument grade OG wide Sitka spruce and some of the better veneer & top quality hardwood logs.......in China:

You want to watch the Malaysian timber trucking vids .....in the background is rainforest clear felled ,just bare dirt mountain sides pounded by heavy rain ,and the roads /tracks are mud....Very likely the teak forests will be replaced by oil palms.
 
Bought a bunch of 4/4 mahogany cleaning out a trailer about 15 years ago. There was a few misc other boards ash fir etc. After agreeing on $4-5/ bf and an estimate on the bf in the trailer. We loaded it onto a truck and moved it to my shop. After getting it to my shop I discovered about 1/4 of the mahogany is teak. I have sold 20 or 30 bf and made a few teak projects for my dad's sailboat. Suppose I should try selling some more of it. It's mostly 8" some 6"
 
No long, thick or wide stock available and to get it much more $.
I remember paying $11 a foot.
I’d say the good old days are gone.
Not stellar teak prices, but these guys in Oxford, PA have great lumber, and their teak is $42-45/bft

 
You find a piece of what you think is common wood on the ground, ship it half-way across the globe and suddenly it is worth big $.

A wood turner friend told me that he looks out for wood pallets that come from from foreign countries. Lots of exotic wood.
To the pallet builders it's just a bunch of common planks.
 
I suppose I am returning to my roots.
As a young man my woodworking were small projects with very few and primitive hand tools.
I was on fire for design and craftsmanship and didn’t have the slightest knowledge of the commodity aspects of timber.
I used the small bits of wood one finds cast off.
These days as I hear and experience the disappearance of stocks I take solace that as I step away from needing a commercial level supply of specific species, woodworking and all the interest I have had in it will remain should I choose it.
Again- found bits of wood and projects as I had as a kid.
Remember a Reverence for Wood?
 
I suppose I am returning to my roots.
As a young man my woodworking were small projects with very few and primitive hand tools.
I was on fire for design and craftsmanship and didn’t have the slightest knowledge of the commodity aspects of timber.
I used the small bits of wood one finds cast off.
These days as I hear and experience the disappearance of stocks I take solace that as I step away from needing a commercial level supply of specific species, woodworking and all the interest I have had in it will remain should I choose it.
Again- found bits of wood and projects as I had as a kid.
Remember a Reverence for Wood?

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