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I-Beam install options for chain hoist

VanillahGarillah

Aluminum
Joined
Oct 10, 2022
Location
North of Baltimore
Greetings. I installed an I-beam across one bay of my garage, supported by 6x6 old growth oak beams. The garage is 79+ years old. I would like to install an I-beam in a larger bay, but in line with the bay so I could lift items off a trailer or pickup near the bay door and move them in via the chain hoist on rollers.

i would have to attach the I-beam to the joists above. These joists are legit 2x8” that are really 2” by 8”. Those were the days! These joists are installed with 24” centers. I would like to attach it to 6 or 7 joists. My question is how much weight could this setup reasonably handle. Not looking for the point of failure, I just want to know if it is reasonable to assume this set up could handle 1500 lbs or less. I’ll select the appropriate I-beam, and I‘ll likely attach plates to the joists and the I-beam to the plates.

i attached pics of the I-beam I have in the small (8-ft wide) bay and pics of the joists in the wider bay (10ft) where I’d like to install a new I-beam.

James
 

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what's that i beam doing there already? why was it added?

plug all the numbers for wood into the ameweb beam calculator. learn how to use it, then compare how stiff that old wood is compared to what it should be.

standard 2x8 joists can span 11 feet for a 30 pounds per square foot live load plus 10 foot dead load at 2 foot on center, i'm assuming that's what you have there. which means the wood can handle about half that load as a concentrated load in the middle of the beam, which would be around 300-400 pounds.

you should easily be able to hang 300 pounds off one of those joists and not really see any deflection, nor cracking.
can you invite 10 people over have them jump up and down and feel safe standing under them?

so anyhow, a 7.5 by 1.75 beam is 61 inches^4, spanning 16 feet with 400 pounds in the middle, the deflection will be half an inch at 2 million psi (soft wood might be 1) and the stress in the wood will be 1100 pounds. in my opinion this is safe.( its a deflection of 1/384, pretty standard). when the span is shortened to 12 feet, the deflection drops to just 0.2 inches.

I pulled a 16 foot 2x4 out of my parents house, 40 years old, and it can support 160 pounds in the middle, deflecting like 4 inches, and the stress was 2000 pounds per square inch. no knots in the whole 16 foot though...i only heard one small crack as i stood on the board. i then decided it was going to get incorporated in a diy glue-lam beam i was making.


re-running my numbers, the 40 year old 2x4 was around 1 million psi stiffness. it might have been hemlock.
 
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Steel bends and buckles.....wood snaps and breaks into splinters...........and thats a straight grain ....,any cross grain severely weakens the wood.beam.....,you may be able to plate the wood with steel .
 
We need to know how long are those joists spanning and how much weight of junk is on the floor they are already holding up? Bel air, is the roof several tons of tile?
BilL D
 
what's that i beam doing there already? why was it added?

plug all the numbers for wood into the ameweb beam calculator. learn how to use it, then compare how stiff that old wood is compared to what it should be.

standard 2x8 joists can span 11 feet for a 30 pounds per square foot live load plus 10 foot dead load at 2 foot on center, i'm assuming that's what you have there. which means the wood can handle about half that load as a concentrated load in the middle of the beam, which would be around 300-400 pounds.

you should easily be able to hang 300 pounds off one of those joists and not really see any deflection, nor cracking.
can you invite 10 people ov
what's that i beam doing there already? why was it added?

plug all the numbers for wood into the ameweb beam calculator. learn how to use it, then compare how stiff that old wood is compared to what it should be.

standard 2x8 joists can span 11 feet for a 30 pounds per square foot live load plus 10 foot dead load at 2 foot on center, i'm assuming that's what you have there. which means the wood can handle about half that load as a concentrated load in the middle of the beam, which would be around 300-400 pounds.

you should easily be able to hang 300 pounds off one of those joists and not really see any deflection, nor cracking.
can you invite 10 people over have them jump up and down and feel safe standing under them?

so anyhow, a 7.5 by 1.75 beam is 61 inches^4, spanning 16 feet with 400 pounds in the middle, the deflection will be half an inch at 2 million psi (soft wood might be 1) and the stress in the wood will be 1100 pounds. in my opinion this is safe.( its a deflection of 1/384, pretty standard). when the span is shortened to 12 feet, the deflection drops to just 0.2 inches.

I pulled a 16 foot 2x4 out of my parents house, 40 years old, and it can support 160 pounds in the middle, deflecting like 4 inches, and the stress was 2000 pounds per square inch. no knots in the whole 16 foot though...i only heard one small crack as i stood on the board. i then decided it was going to get incorporated in a diy glue-lam beam i was making.


re-running my numbers, the 40 year old 2x4 was around 1 million psi stiffness. it might have been hemlock.
I installed the I-beam in the photo which rests on two large beams. it spans 10 feet total, but 8 are useable with the chain hoist I hang from it.

i want to install one length-wise in the 12-foot wide bay
 
Your best option is to put the I beam in place. Store two posts out of the way. Then when you want to lift something heavy, put the posts in for your lift.
I might have to do this but I can’t place a support beam on one side if a trailer with a lathe on it is sitting in the place where the beam is needed while I hook up the lathe to lift it off the trailer…
 
We need to know how long are those joists spanning and how much weight of junk is on the floor they are already holding up? Bel air, is the roof several tons of tile?
BilL D
Unfortunately the slate tile has been removed and replaced with modern roofing. There is a section in my attic with full slate tiles still on it. Previous owner built an add-on with a roof at a shallower angle and built right over the slate roof. Odd,
 
Its easy to proof test a lifting point witha chain hoist ......apply some weight and see if it springs back.......as long as it springs back ,its OK with the lift ........wood will make ominous cracking noises ,at which point ,you back off.
 
Beware of slim pillars to support lift beams......if its heavy wall pipe ,you wont have any problems ,but there is a factor called column eccentricty that comes into play with long supports of wood or thin wall steel tube.
 
I would install blocking between the existing beams to prevent roll over. I would assume they are tied together at the ends so I would put blocking four feet in from each end for a 12' span. Putting it too close to the center may cause problems attaching the I-beam. I would install blocking between every joist that supports the beam and the last three bays at each end as a minimum.
For easy installation each block can be staggered 1.5" for easy end nailing.
Notice that nailing a piece of 1x4 on the underside of the joist does almost nothing about rollover. Solid blocking is easier to retrofit then x-bracing.
Bill D
 
Roll-over will not be an issue. I will fabricate several U-plates to bolt into each joist, the bottom of each U-plate will bolt to the top of the I-Beam, and the chain hoist will be attached to a roller that can roll back and forth along the I-Beam. I’ll block the joists around the I-Beam. Again, it only has to support about 1500 lbs.
 
If your concern about being able to lift a lathe off of a trailer, I think you need to rethink your plan. I've always handled getting a lathe off the trailer outside the garage or shop. Then skid it into the shop with come along or such. use pipe for rollers to roll it around into place.
I'm not a fan of trying to erect I-beam of any sorts overhead in a small place and relying on existing structure to support it without going through a structural engineer first.
How often do earthquakes erupt in your area?
 
If your concern about being able to lift a lathe off of a trailer, I think you need to rethink your plan. I've always handled getting a lathe off the trailer outside the garage or shop. Then skid it into the shop with come along or such. use pipe for rollers to roll it around into place.
I'm not a fan of trying to erect I-beam of any sorts overhead in a small place and relying on existing structure to support it without going through a structural engineer first.
How often do earthquakes erupt in your area?
Really??? Earthquakes!!! The man wants to spend maybe 10 minutes lifting a lathe off a trailer and you think he should take the possibility of an earthquake during that time into consideration. That is the dumbest, most ridiculous, safety guideline question I have ever heard. You must work for OSHA.
 
If your concern about being able to lift a lathe off of a trailer, I think you need to rethink your plan. I've always handled getting a lathe off the trailer outside the garage or shop. Then skid it into the shop with come along or such. use pipe for rollers to roll it around into place.
I'm not a fan of trying to erect I-beam of any sorts overhead in a small place and relying on existing structure to support it without going through a structural engineer first.
How often do earthquakes erupt in your area?
I do this too, and to clarify I won’t be lifting many complete machines unless they’re less than 3/4 ton. I have a Sidney lathe on a trailer that weighs about 2 tons. I have to disassemble it into ‘manageable’ components. I think the tailstock probably weighs 200+ lbs. I have too many ailments to list, but I don’t do any heavy lifting or schooching machinery across the floor with a breaker bar. I build heavy duty carts with extremely heavy duty casters that can jack the wheels up off the floor and I put the machines on these carts. I have put partial machinery on them too and re-assembled the machine(s) so the whole thing either sits on a carts or has theses casters. They make leveling these things a breeze. I hope that clarifies what I’m doing.

I live in MD and I am unaware of any major fault lines that might become active in my lifetime, but I understand what you mean. It’s not worth compromising structural integrity, which is why I posted this in the first place.

James
 
He lives in the USA and not in south Florida or south Texas. Therefore he lives in a seismic area. Adding extra random weight like an I beam above a soft story is not a great idea is seismic or hurricane areas.
Maryland is not known for big quakes but 5.8 is enough to do some damage, especially to brick buildings. The Washingtom monument was shut down for repairs for several years after just a 5.8 quake from 90 miles away..
Bill D
 
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