What's new
What's new

I guess its time for me to start my own Home shop thread.

Sounds like you understand it perfectly...(y)
Thanks, though ....I wish. Nothing like weatherization work to keep one humble.

We recently reinsulated an 1830's timberframed building (cellulose), then blower door tested our work. Watched air leaks into the inside with an IR camera while the blower was on. Cold spots at the baseboard, edges of the window trim, a couple missed wall cavities, pegholes through the exposed framing, pretty much everywhere.

The rest of the crew (first-timers) thought they'd done really well till they saw the video. They didn't notice that the IR sensitivity had been cranked up, so I didn't tell them.:D
 
Yeah, trying to finish out the inside of older post frame buildings just plain sucks. There's really no one good way to do it as they all very in construction. Newer builds are at least a bit more standardized.........but they suck too. My shop is stick build and it's no different that finishing out a house. Stuff fiberglass batts, vap barrier, sheet it out in whatever material you please.............
 
@empower If I had to insulate your building for myself, I would use foam board and seal the foam board at all the joints. This gives something very close to the effect of spray foam at a much lower cost. Install the foam board over the girts. 1” minimum thickness, 2’ would be better. But that first inch is where most of the gains will be. I have started doing this in my own shop after learning that spray foam was going to be prohibitively expensive; the difference is I have stud/rafters on 24” centers rather than pole barn with girts. I am sealing all the edges of each piece of foam. Anything less airtight was not an attractive option as the sheeting on my building is ship lap and leaks air like a sieve. Only the worst areas have been insulated so far but the effect has been dramatic. My long term plan is sheet the interior once all the foam baron is in, and fill the space between the interior sheeting and the foam board with dense fill cellulose.
 
there's only so much you can get out of a phase converter. i have maybe 50 amps of single phase 220v coming to the shop. wtf am i gonna be able to power with that? do tell me...

25kw worth of solar panels is ~4k with shipping. my normal house electricity bill is ~250/month average. with a machine running its gonna be at least double.
at that rate, 3 years to pay back the panels and inverter. show me where/how i'm wrong.

Just out of curiosity which panels are you looking at ordering and where? I am thinking of covering my shop with solar as our electrical rates are climbing fast. Would be a similar size system. From what I can tell a DIY install right now probably has about a 5 year payback around here. That is not too bad. That is a grid tie system without batteries.
 
Just out of curiosity which panels are you looking at ordering and where? I am thinking of covering my shop with solar as our electrical rates are climbing fast. Would be a similar size system. From what I can tell a DIY install right now probably has about a 5 year payback around here. That is not too bad. That is a grid tie system without batteries.
i have not looked into specific components yet, not until i insulate the barn, build a utility room etc
 
grow into something i can support myself/family with, without getting too extravagant.
How much is 1500 sf of industrial space in your area?

As much as I am for having a bad ass home shop....

Might be cheap/easier/faster/less stressful just to get what you need. Seems like alot of work just to outgrow it quickly... :willy_nilly::willy_nilly::willy_nilly::willy_nilly::willy_nilly:
 
How much is 1500 sf of industrial space in your area?

As much as I am for having a bad ass home shop....

Might be cheap/easier/faster/less stressful just to get what you need. Seems like alot of work just to outgrow it quickly... :willy_nilly::willy_nilly::willy_nilly::willy_nilly::willy_nilly:
i mean i'm already at almost 1500sf. i'd rather improve my own barn, invest into my own property than give rent money to someone else.
 
Were it me, and local zoning and your property space allowed, I’d build a fresh shop building. Futsing around with an uninsulated pole barn of dubious condition seems a waste of time and money. Use the pole building for what it’s designed for- crude cold storage.

Suggest at least 12’ ceiling for overhead lifting and 2x6 standard stud walls. Local engineer can tell you concrete floor details.

When you factor in your time, assuming you stay on current property, it will be far cheaper to build a good new building to suit your needs.
 
Were it me, and local zoning and your property space allowed, I’d build a fresh shop building. Futsing around with an uninsulated pole barn of dubious condition seems a waste of time and money. Use the pole building for what it’s designed for- crude cold storage.

Suggest at least 12’ ceiling for overhead lifting and 2x6 standard stud walls. Local engineer can tell you concrete floor details.

When you factor in your time, assuming you stay on current property, it will be far cheaper to build a good new building to suit your needs.
this would absolutely be a great idea if i had all the money up front to do it...
unfortunately i dont, therefore starting with something i have and slowly building it up, makes a lot more sense TO ME.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ox
Hi empower:
You wrote:
"starting with something i have and slowly building it up, makes a lot more sense TO ME."
I absolutely agree... at this time you're going to do a biggish capital burn before you have revenue to offset it.

I'm guessing having a fully tricked out shop is ten years away unless demand for your services just explodes and you can service it all.
By all means, get it running first and making revenue.
If you find out you miscalculated in a good way and have a mountain of work, you can always expand and your circumstances will dictate how you go about it.
By that point it's only money and if your plans don't end up working you can change course.

But RIGHT NOW, cash is your survival and your peace of mind...I'd be cautious about doing a big blowout up front...it's going to be ugly enough when you lay out cash for the Mikron.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
Hi empower:
You wrote:
"starting with something i have and slowly building it up, makes a lot more sense TO ME."
I absolutely agree... at this time you're going to do a biggish capital burn before you have revenue to offset it.

I'm guessing having a fully tricked out shop is ten years away unless demand for your services just explodes and you can service it all.
By all means, get it running first and making revenue.
If you find out you miscalculated in a good way and have a mountain of work, you can always expand and your circumstances will dictate how you go about it.
By that point it's only money and if your plans don't end up working you can change course.

But RIGHT NOW, cash is your survival and your peace of mind...I'd be cautious about doing a big blowout up front...it's going to be ugly enough when you lay out cash for the Mikron.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
exactly my thoughts!
 
thats nowhere near enough to run the equipment i'm looking to run. of course i have more than 50 amps entering the property, but i dont want to rob my house of power to run the shop.
solar on its own = absolutely, i agree its not a good alternative. but solar+tons of storage, which i have, is a completely different story.
Be aware, the utility will not let you run the solar stand-alone if you plan on having it attached to the grid. With solar you have only two options:
- on-line, whereby the solar is attached to the grid
- off-line, whereby the solar is totally detached from the grid
Therefore, you are going to have to think through what you are trying to do, e.g. run the shop off stored energy in the batteries.

If I were you, I'd try REALLY HARD to get 3-phase utility power rigged to your property. It will make life so much easier. Trying to rig up stored energy to run the shop to me seems like it'll entail a lot of compromises and lots of potential issues.
 
Be aware, the utility will not let you run the solar stand-alone if you plan on having it attached to the grid. With solar you have only two options:
- on-line, whereby the solar is attached to the grid
- off-line, whereby the solar is totally detached from the grid
Therefore, you are going to have to think through what you are trying to do, e.g. run the shop off stored energy in the batteries.

If I were you, I'd try REALLY HARD to get 3-phase utility power rigged to your property. It will make life so much easier. Trying to rig up stored energy to run the shop to me seems like it'll entail a lot of compromises and lots of potential issues.
i've mentioned a few times that it will not be attached to the grid.
 
The problem with foam board against metal is keeping the foam contiguous, ie, the air sealing. I've pencilled it out for a couple buildings and the spray foam was about 10% more, air seal guaranteed. The best part was that I didn't have to do it :-) And spray foam can do things like wrap around the inside of the poles - try that with foam board. Just too difficult to do perfectly, the spray foamer can do it easily.
 
i've mentioned a few times that it will not be attached to the grid.
You are gonna need some honking big batteries, and you are gonna need a lot of solar panels running for days between each usage, and you will not be doing any work in your shop during the winter months. Doesn't seem like an outstanding strategy to me.

I have a very large solar array (50KW), and even in sunny california, 70% of the annual power is produced during the 3 summer months, June/July/Aug, during winter months you get maybe 5% of your annual solar production over 4-5 months.

One viable solution: buy a diesel powered generator, and view that as your primary power source, with solar just supplementing to save a little diesel here and there.
 
You are gonna need some honking big batteries, and you are gonna need a lot of solar panels running for days between each usage, and you will not be doing any work in your shop during the winter months. Doesn't seem like an outstanding strategy to me.

I have a very large solar array (50KW), and even in sunny california, 70% of the annual power is produced during the 3 summer months, June/July/Aug, during winter months you get maybe 5% of your annual solar production over 4-5 months.

One viable solution: buy a diesel powered generator, and view that as your primary power source, with solar just supplementing to save a little diesel here and there.
i have 800KWH worth of batteries, and will be doing ~50kw worth of solar panels, and can always add more if needed.
 
i have 800KWH worth of batteries, and will be doing ~50kw worth of solar panels, and can always add more if needed.

Just out of curiosity, how big of an area does that cover?
Just to put some scale in my head.


----------------

I am Ox and I approve this here post!
 








 
Back
Top