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Ideal BT30 Aluminum Finisher?

For Aluminum most like uncoated, at full slotting I have had a ZRN coating add value, keeping the hot Aluminum from sticking, but a non-coated end mill is sharper, lives longer, and leaves a better finish.

Low helix (Helical 35°, YG1 37°)end mills definitely out perform high helix(45°) for roughing, higher helix is better for a finish unless you need a long skinny tool, then the lower helix gives less engagement and reduces chatter probability.

I personally just call it all balanced and I use Helical for everything except tiny tools, and Harvey for tiny tools. done and done.
35-37° for rough, and finish if I don't care, and 45° for a finish if it really matters, unless long and noodly.

Buy some cheap Garrs also if you want to test the waters, cheaper, and not too different, I don't buy them because the pricing is low enough for Helical, and Aluminum tooling especially if you use a separate finisher lasts for thousands of parts.
espeshly if you know how to program shit correctly, not Titan style.
If your buying micro tools(smaller than 1/8") then dont buy Garr or cheap, they will break, I use Harvey for sub 1/8"

If parts are large, I use a 1.5" 3 flute indexable ripper for all my roughing, it is slower slightly but cheaper.
We chew 1,000lbs a week with these dudes.
This is good to know, thank you.

I was going to use MariTool's aluminum endmills, I have used several for small things, soft jaws, fixtures, etc and have found them to last quite awhile. They offer both 38 and 45.

I had planned to run a rougher finisher, rotating the finisher to the rougher. Would it be better in this instance since the tools seem to last forever to use a dedicated rougher and finisher?
 
Would it be better in this instance since the tools seem to last forever to use a dedicated rougher and finisher?

Most definitely. Unless I'm doing 5 pcs or less in aluminum I always have dedicated roughing and finishing end mills.
The rougher just might for some reason develop a tiny nick in the cutting edge but still runs fine. It will show on the finish.
 
This is good to know, thank you.

I was going to use MariTool's aluminum endmills, I have used several for small things, soft jaws, fixtures, etc and have found them to last quite awhile. They offer both 38 and 45.

I had planned to run a rougher finisher, rotating the finisher to the rougher. Would it be better in this instance since the tools seem to last forever to use a dedicated rougher and finisher?
I use a separate rougher finisher for 3 reasons, better finish longer, less deflection dimension over time, and smaller or less burrs.

I try to get the machine to do all the deburring anymore, I have too many machines to run, So I have a 5 axis CAM module to do any deburring I can.

If'n ur gonna rotate the finisher into the rougher when the roughers worn like steel, then you'll need 38° on both,
unless your roughing cuts are lessened for the 45°.

2 cents from the monkey cage.
 
Most definitely. Unless I'm doing 5 pcs or less in aluminum I always have dedicated roughing and finishing end mills.
The rougher just might for some reason develop a tiny nick in the cutting edge but still runs fine. It will show on the finish.
Espeshly if'n ur one of the YG1 guys. They leave a great finish, but they will start to leave a bad one if used as a rougher also, they will also leave a bad finish if your stock to leave is too thin.(ghosting)
 
I had planned to run a rougher finisher, rotating the finisher to the rougher. Would it be better in this instance since the tools seem to last forever to use a dedicated rougher and finisher?
Yes, but I use totally different roughers and finishers. Sometimes different sizes, but almost always different geometries. In Al, the rougher is a Destiny Diamondback or Maritool serrated rougher. Biggest reason is chip management. If I rough with a straight endmill, very quickly I get mountains of hard-to-move birds-nested stringy swarf. A segmented or serrated rougher makes little bits that are much more compact and much more likely to get flushed out of the enclosure.

Regards.

Mike
 
Yes, but I use totally different roughers and finishers. Sometimes different sizes, but almost always different geometries. In Al, the rougher is a Destiny Diamondback or Maritool serrated rougher. Biggest reason is chip management. If I rough with a straight endmill, very quickly I get mountains of hard-to-move birds-nested stringy swarf. A segmented or serrated rougher makes little bits that are much more compact and much more likely to get flushed out of the enclosure.

Regards.

Mike
This is definitely something to mention, and the taller the part the worse this gets, the long skinny little hairs piling up, then your finish pass has recut and looks like a chainsaw was used.
If you don't have higher pressure coolant, and have some taller cuts, this can happen.

edit: a knuckle rougher / corn cobb is not the same machining strategies not for HSM.

Also if you have a POS Haas(Me) then the chips from a segmented cutter are small enough that a lot goes through the chip pan screen and you have a pile of sand that clogs the system.
(Man you just can't WIN!)

When I need a segmented cutter I actually have ordered them custom from Helical, and I have the segments almost twice the spacing, muey bueno!
(They said they may start offering them)

But I stopped all that craziness, an indexable ripper throws heavy thick short chips, nothing left behind, the consistency of the chip is great for the entire system, doesn't pile up on parts, actually it sand blasts the inside of the cabinet chips are thrown so far and hard away, they wash down and through augers nicely, they pile up in bins very dense.
An indexable to me, even though slightly slower, is the far better way to chew Aluminum.

 
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Great advise, appreciate it everyone.

In regards to the chips, normally I would agree with an inserted cutter. I like using them, even on steel when possible. I've never really taken to the "chip splitter" roughers. For this job though, the rats nests won't be a concern.

In reference to your issues with the coolant sump, when I first got my Brother, I didn't know any better or think anything of it. When I switched from coolant to oil and cleaned out the sump, it was half full of steel chips. I do lots of fine detail work, and the chips are VERY small.

So I had a friend weld up filter boxes for each chute, with a coarse screen and a fine screen, and they do a really good job of keeping chips out of the sump. You said your machining a thousand pounds of aluminum a week, that won't work for you! It's the end of may and I haven't filled my two 15 gallon storage barrels yet. I make about a 5 gallon buckets worth of chips a month :D
 
Great advise, appreciate it everyone.

In regards to the chips, normally I would agree with an inserted cutter. I like using them, even on steel when possible. I've never really taken to the "chip splitter" roughers. For this job though, the rats nests won't be a concern.

In reference to your issues with the coolant sump, when I first got my Brother, I didn't know any better or think anything of it. When I switched from coolant to oil and cleaned out the sump, it was half full of steel chips. I do lots of fine detail work, and the chips are VERY small.

So I had a friend weld up filter boxes for each chute, with a coarse screen and a fine screen, and they do a really good job of keeping chips out of the sump. You said your machining a thousand pounds of aluminum a week, that won't work for you! It's the end of may and I haven't filled my two 15 gallon storage barrels yet. I make about a 5 gallon buckets worth of chips a month :D

Yeah our sumps have a secondary screen on top of a metal screen(So 3), we dump these often, so often when doing sand castles that we now added a fine pool net because it has a handle and is quick to dump.

Yeah each of our (4)machines create at least 40 gallons per day, and some parts create 120 gallons per day. 🤮

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