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Information to make gears for metric threading for Lodge & Shipley 14" Model X?

AllenHunt

Plastic
Joined
Dec 15, 2020
Location
Kentucky, USA
Does anyone have the information to be able to make the proper gears for metric threading? I checked with Monarch and the cost was too much for me. The manual specifies the gears needed with respect to the number of teeth for both the change gears and the two "drivetrain" gears. The attached files show the information provided in the manual with respect to the gears needed.
 

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johnoder

Diamond
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Location
Houston, TX USA
There is a whale of a lot of work ahead of you

The project will involve understanding what is needed and where - and the making of gears that fit in the spaces provided.

Get in the linked manual and go way down to Page 29-ET and start digesting Fig. 15-ET


As to MAKING the new gears have to fit in the places shown on Fig 15-ET and have to have the numbers of teeth shown on Fig 15-ET

ON EDIT
One of the things to think about in gear making is Pressure Angle - illustrated here

ON EDIT
Another tidbit. USA gears are often sized by "DP" or Diametral Pitch. Your Model X will have "DP" gears in that area of discussion. One can determine what the "DP" is, and here is how
Count teeth
Add TWO to count
Measure O.D.
Divide OD into tooth count plus two

Example:
2.125" OD
32 teeth
34 divided by 2.125 = 16 DP
 

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john.k

Diamond
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Location
Brisbane Qld Australia
If you want to keep it simple ,you cant get away from 127 tooth gear......generally 100/127 teeth,but the Monarch chart shows 50 teeth to 127 teeth......same fractionx2 .....anyhoo,likely you have the 50 ,so get a 127 printed in plastic by someone who does that ,and it will likley be good enough.,and wont break the bank.
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
In todays age of dirt cheap old CNC's it's often easier and cheaper to buy a CNC lathe or three than it is to set one manual lathe up for metric threading and of coarse to actually thread with it because it doesn't work the same.

I'm in the midst of bidding on an old long bed CNC lathe. I would put a 4 jaw on it and replace my 120" Pacemaker. I can probably get $7500 for my long bed squarehead pacemaker. I can buy the CNC, which is a way better machine in every respect, for a couple grand, and it's 1000 times more capable/versatile.
 

marka12161

Hot Rolled
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
Location
Oswego, NY USA
In todays age of dirt cheap old CNC's it's often easier and cheaper to buy a CNC lathe or three than it is to set one manual lathe up for metric threading and of coarse to actually thread with it because it doesn't work the same.

I'm in the midst of bidding on an old long bed CNC lathe. I would put a 4 jaw on it and replace my 120" Pacemaker. I can probably get $7500 for my long bed squarehead pacemaker. I can buy the CNC, which is a way better machine in every respect, for a couple grand, and it's 1000 times more capable/versatile.
In my pre-retirement life, I've done my fair share of computer programming. I've never really been a big fan of it. I'm curious, what is the learning curve like for a used CNC machine? Also, how painful is it to manage the maintenance given the constant obsoletescence of electronic components? As a hobbyist i have no interest in CNC machines, but i am curious just the same.
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
In my pre-retirement life, I've done my fair share of computer programming. I've never really been a big fan of it. I'm curious, what is the learning curve like for a used CNC machine? Also, how painful is it to manage the maintenance given the constant obsoletescence of electronic components? As a hobbyist i have no interest in CNC machines, but i am curious just the same.

There's no such thing as an obsolete Fanuc. You will have issues with old encoders, old CRT's, electrolytic capacitors in power supplies.

Not really a big deal with some basic tools and google. The worst I had was a tool magazine encoder death on a 1982 Mori VMC. I reverse engineered the encoder from the glass inside. I used the machine to make a new one using an array of microswitches running on a rotary cam plate. It took me 2 weeks to figure that one out and make the new part. I learned a lot. Learned to read and understand binary. Knowing what I know now, I'd have replaced that 1982 encoder with a $60 one from Automation direct and used an Arduino to translate the signals. I have had great success replacing obsolete encoders in other applications with modern off the shelf units. They actually make encoders that are designed to be somewhat universal so you can do this easily.

Most problems are simple. Bad LCD backlight. Weak thermal overload on a contactor. Bad servo cabling shorting out somewhere.

Learning curve isn't bad. Lathe is easy to program. I would say if you got a CNC lathe it would be best to get someone who knows what they're doing to spend a day a week showing you the basics for a month and you'd be making parts.
 

marka12161

Hot Rolled
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
Location
Oswego, NY USA
There's no such thing as an obsolete Fanuc. You will have issues with old encoders, old CRT's, electrolytic capacitors in power supplies.

Not really a big deal with some basic tools and google. The worst I had was a tool magazine encoder death on a 1982 Mori VMC. I reverse engineered the encoder from the glass inside. I used the machine to make a new one using an array of microswitches running on a rotary cam plate. It took me 2 weeks to figure that one out and make the new part. I learned a lot. Learned to read and understand binary. Knowing what I know now, I'd have replaced that 1982 encoder with a $60 one from Automation direct and used an Arduino to translate the signals. I have had great success replacing obsolete encoders in other applications with modern off the shelf units. They actually make encoders that are designed to be somewhat universal so you can do this easily.

Most problems are simple. Bad LCD backlight. Weak thermal overload on a contactor. Bad servo cabling shorting out somewhere.

Learning curve isn't bad. Lathe is easy to program. I would say if you got a CNC lathe it would be best to get someone who knows what they're doing to spend a day a week showing you the basics for a month and you'd be making parts.
Interesting, thanks. My hat goes off to all who need to and can successfully reverse engineer complex machinery.
 

Garwood

Diamond
Joined
Oct 10, 2009
Location
Oregon
Interesting, thanks. My hat goes off to all who need to and can successfully reverse engineer complex machinery.

lol. It was a round glass plate with a pattern silk screened on it. I just scaled the pattern to fit some microswitches I had.

Here's the 2013 thread where I documented it so it might help someone else someday-

 








 
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