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Is there a good alternative to McMaster Carr?

My company works for large companies, soms being reliance steel subsidiaries. Some are so bad, they bicker over buying packaging labels for international stion shipping g to save 2 cents a piece but spend 6c more eon shipping lol.

I had this same issue where they cut out suppliers, but in years of dealing with this, the solution I ha e found that works is offer several suppliers that "work" but end up being unreliable.

Such as, suggest putting g harbor freight part numbers on drawings and see about getting then approved by the higher ups. I say I need this approved by you, to send to your customer. It works great to make people realize what is reality and what isnt. Mcmaster has a great paper trail system compared to most other suppliers.

You can also say, the decision to change suppliers was made by people at a higher pay grade your not at the pay grade to make decisions based on their requirements. This is when I say, "I'm just a dumb contractor, what would I know about my industry to help you"
 
Donkey Hotey has precisely stated the problem with this one sentence.

"The root of the problem is this reward system where the goals of each, selfish, individual organization are at odds with the spirit of the what you think the goal is."

We used to call that the "dog robber" system and it is why so many lower level employees are dissatisfied with "performance reviews". This product of a local business school creates incentives for managers to find fault with those below them to keep raises at a minimum. At each rung of this food chain ladder managers must minimize raises for subordinates in order to gain the maximum their manager will allow. The closer to the top of the chain you get the fatter the raises and bonuses available from a fixed pool of money.
 
Should I be looking for another job? Yes I have felt that for a long time. The problem is any management I have contact with says. "No you don't need to worry, we are not discussing getting rid of the mechanical shop." But management that makes those decisions I never have contact with. The company is large enough that it is being run by people who don't work there and have no information on what we do other than high level cost accounting.
Yeah...."No you don't need to worry".....handwriting is on the wall so start preparing an exit strategy.
And, maybe it's already been mentioned but corporations are facing other requirments they must adopt. (A previous employer has embraced this concept and now spends lots of time documenting that employees are on board with corporate goals which really are Gov't goals)
Maybe McMaster has been determined not to be fully immersed in "supplier diversity".
 
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Can you imagine how much fun you could have filling out a "supplier diversity" report ? mmmmm. Think (Archie Bunker)(10) .... :D
Well silly...you simply hire a consultant to aid your efforts working toward compliance---either that or outsource product and services and let them deal with the headache.
Likely not related to the OP but it might mean an advantage in winning contracts/bids with gov't agencies.
(I beleive there are also tax credits to be had in addition to contract preference)
 
After reading this thread twice......time for you to exit.
If a Multi-bil company can't provide you with anymore equipment than that and now this foolishness....
your future is dismal there anyway.......hey, you have 3 months to look.
 
Get yourself a company credit card and buy from McMaster direct.

My p card is the most powerful tool for getting things done fast.

If you need to, play the game by going to purchasing’s approved vendors and record the time wasted. Write a report and mathematically prove, that you need McMaster or a p card.
 
I didn't realize you're the same guy as this whole thing:


Yeah, McMaster is only one of many things going on.

Next the OP's going to be complaining they don't respect his pronouns, and he doesn't get his own non-binary restroom.
 
1. Absolutely my company abuses payment due dates and pushes net 30 to net 90 to net 120 days. So it is possible these vendors are saying no more. We must be paid on time.
Sounds like you have a shithead CFO who knows exactly what he's doing.

Let's say you have 50 million dollars in accounts payable. At current interest rates, 120 days pays out over 1.5%. That's $750K in interest that your company pockets at the expense of its vendors, every 4 months. It also pushes back 50 million dollars of liabilities into next year's balance sheet, which makes your CFO look good.

Meanwhile, the company is burning millions of dollars in wasted labor, such as having you scour the internet procuring nuts and bolts. CFO knows this. He only cares about the short term gains though. He doesn't plan on sticking around long enough to deal with the fallout. You shouldn't either.
 
Mc-carr
Long time supplier to me.
Not the low cost by any comparison.
Fast, oh yes. Dependable, oh yes. Higher price oh yes.
They will send things if you get behind on terms but they are nice about it.
What I like is that I can call the phone number, say who I am part number and quantity. It is so simple.
Next day and it is in my shop.
Back in the 80s they were not competitive in pricing.
 
On each purchase order add a seperate line item of added cost of time wasted having to look up multiple companies.
request a full time secretary to research multiple companies for best prices including best shipping rates.
Doctors all have full time staff whose only job is to figure out how to bill insurance companies. Sounds like your bosses want you to have some added full time staff to figure out who to place each order with. If I was ordering bolts, nuts and washers I would, of course, send hours researching best prices for each of those three items. Who cares if the shipping was 3 times as much if you save a little on each item before shipping costs. Not even considering the cost to open and sort three seperate incoming packages.
BilL D.
 
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Mc-carr
Long time supplier to me.
I had to think about my experience / relationship with them and I have to say there is only one complaint. Everything else has been amazing. Heck, I'm blown away that their will-call dock is even open Sunday. I'm 84 miles away from the L.A. location. If I need anything badly enough, I can have it. It sounds crazy but, it's easy to waste 3-4 hours driving around to random hardware, plumbing, electrical and home stores looking for something when just driving down there will solve it. I've done it multiple times.

What's the complaint then? They won't give me a paper catalog. I get that books are expensive. Sell me a catalog! Nope. I don't know what their problem is. We spent $125K with them one year and they still wouldn't send a yellow book. I have a couple of expired ones that I bummed off of other people. The irony is they never bought anything. No idea what the process is for deciding who gets one and who doesn't.

I totally love their website but, there are times when I just thumb through the book and discover things I had no idea they carried. They have coffee makers, coffee cups, even coffee. Carpet runners, brooms, scales of all sizes, heater controls, whatever. They have geologist picks, dental picks and toothpicks. Knowing the McMaster catalog and website is a valuable job skill.

On each purchase order add a seperate line item of added cost of time wasted having to look up multiple companies.
request a full time secretary to research multiple companies for best prices including best shipping rates.
This sounds like a good idea but, this ends up digging his own grave. Management takes this and says, "See? This is why making prototypes in-house is a bad idea. Look at all these extra costs! We can save $xxx,xxx a year by outsourcing this to our world class global supply chain!"

This thread has given me a bad case of flashbacks. Big corporate stupidity is truly something you have to live through to believe.
 
Hey Donkey, if you want one, I have three (127, 128 and 129) that I don't use much. Happy to send you one for the cost of postage. Prob $10 from my package drop in WA.
 
Hey Donkey, if you want one, I have three (127, 128 and 129) that I don't use much. Happy to send you one for the cost of postage. Prob $10 from my package drop in WA.
That is a generous offer. The one sitting next to me is 111. I couldn't go a dime below $20 +shipping. Does $20 even buy a Quarter Pounder deal anymore? PM incoming...
 
In this day and age most of those at the top of the corporate pyramid have little knowledge or experience on how things work out on the plant floor.
Sometimes decisions are made to favor other relationships, both business and social and do not always mean they are the best decision regarding efficiency and productivity. If it's a state agency look who he big donors are to university systems or sometimes political parties.
In some cases certain product/services have pre-written specifications that can be spec'd into the bid process. These are usually worded so that only one vendor meets the spec. This is not uncommon on machinery and equipment.
We used a "P" card which made it real easy for management to determine who we were sourcing from and check for compliance to purchasing rules. I learned to pre-empt potential conflict by obtaining a waiver from the boss via email. And yeah,,,,printed each and every email.
Generally the majority of employees will take the path of least resistance and could care less about the price of parts with a shrug of their shoulders figuring why care---not my money.
 
Should I be looking for another job? Yes I have felt that for a long time. The problem is any management I have contact with says. "No you don't need to worry, we are not discussing getting rid of the mechanical shop." But management that makes those decisions I never have contact with. The company is large enough that it is being run by people who don't work there and have no information on what we do other than high level cost accounting.
They just don't want you to leave until they choose to shut down your department. Brush up your resume and start looking for a landing spot; your company, or at least your branch of it, is dying.
 








 
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