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Is this Adjustable Angle Plate ( Precise 10" x 15" SKU: 202-169 ID: 347297 ) worth it?

haha, Its nicer to work with big handful's of them from large corps., then at least you get to meet the more humble dudes also.
we hired one once, who wanted to try to be a machinist, bad idea,
I already knew the guy for years, already knew it was a bad idea.
He just wanted to check and monitor, and organize, and analyze, job shop shit parts, like dude, we just need to ge thtem done fast,
stop trying to engineer shit.
We had to let him go, he was extremely unproductive, and funny thing is he didn't understand that when we told him. haha
"Back in the day" we worked a lot with a guy that was an old school engineer, very smart and gave us work quite often. He was super easy to work with and if we asked him about a certain design, he would change it to what we recommended no questions asked.
That guy was a blast to work with. Funny as hell too.
 
So did a little searching on large sine plates and they are way above our price range. Looking to spend less than $1000 definingly. and would like at least 12" X 12" And we are not allowed to buy used. and must be through preferred vendor. Which somehow is usually more expensive as well. I will keep looking but if any one knows of something in that criteria. Let me know. Thanks.
 
Hi Mtndew:
Naahh, I've worked with some truly gifted guys who were well worth listening to, collaborating with, and socializing with.
The true dickwads were in the minority and they typically sorted themselves right out of a job fairly promptly.

A few were naive about just how much practical knowledge a smart, motivated machinist can contribute to a problem...those that didn't get it and failed to take advantage of the opportunity, either got promoted up into management, or got dumped because nobody liked them.

I find I can come to a conclusion about who is going to be hard to work with, and who is going to be a joy to work with fairly promptly...for me the key seems to be having confidence in my own worth and communicate it (subtly)...I know shit they don't know...that's why they hired me, but so long as I don't rub their noses in it, all is good and we can proceed.

If I approach them with an offer to help...it's usually well received.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
The two we have at work are unknown as far as accuracy. But an essential tool when drilling out broken studs in engine manifolds. The bolt holes are usually at some compound angle to any surface I can bolt it to.

Dave
 
Hi Mtndew:
Naahh, I've worked with some truly gifted guys who were well worth listening to, collaborating with, and socializing with.
The true dickwads were in the minority and they typically sorted themselves right out of a job fairly promptly.

A few were naive about just how much practical knowledge a smart, motivated machinist can contribute to a problem...those that didn't get it and failed to take advantage of the opportunity, either got promoted up into management, or got dumped because nobody liked them.

I find I can come to a conclusion about who is going to be hard to work with, and who is going to be a joy to work with fairly promptly...for me the key seems to be having confidence in my own worth and communicate it (subtly)...I know shit they don't know...that's why they hired me, but so long as I don't rub their noses in it, all is good and we can proceed.

If I approach them with an offer to help...it's usually well received.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
It is easier depending on your job label also, I've seen some dudes with egos to check when they worked with the "machinists".
but most of the time when they were sent to me fresh out of college, I was the "tooling engineer", they were the "mechanical engineer", so there wasn't any ego really,
they more acted like they were still in school , and this was another class.
 
Hi Rough-cutter:
Are you planning to do this kind of thing often, or is this a one-time job?
If it is, then a skeleton frame with a sacrificial plate bolted on top of it is the easiest way forward.
Basically you bolt sawcut aluminum wedges onto the mill table, surface them at the correct angle and the proper relationship to one another, and then bolt an aluminum plate on top of them.

Be sure to tap the bolt holes in before you attach them to the mill table so you can get them in location and at right angles to the top surface...you whisker over them with a ball cutter just to get them all perfectly aligned without having to screw around.

If, on the other hand, you will do this often, get the boss to spring for a big trunnion, and bolt a temporary table to it that you can tap into and put clamps onto.
50 grand or so will get you there :D

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
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Hi EPAIII:
I'm assuming you're talking about manual mills here, (like a Bridgeport) and in this circumstance it depends, of course, on what you want to make.

An example from my days as a mold maker before CNC was a common thing:
Some features in some plastic parts are molded with slides, which function as you'd expect from the name.
They are actuated with angled pins called "Cam pins" or "Horn pins"...the angled holes to press the pins into are reamed into the mold base and angled holes are also cut into the slides to engage the pins so when the mold opens, the slides are cammed back and release the part.

The cam pin bores in the slides are made by tipping the slide in the vise wherever possible.
The angled holes in the mold base are put in by tipping the head.

When you leave the head vertical and tip the job, you can easily determine where you are and get the hole in the correct spot.
If you raise or lower the table, the relationship doesn't change, so you can put in a centerdrill, a drill a boring bar and a reamer in succession without having to care how long or short they are...just crank the table until you're at the right height, and can get the tool into the spindle.

As soon as you tip the head all that gets way more complicated because the axis of the hole no longer aligns with the table movement, so you have to plan way better, and you can still get screwed up and have to re-establish your datums several times.
Also tipping the head means tramming it back in afterward...a small pain in the ass

So as a policy, I only tip the head on my Bridgeport when there is no other choice.

Obviously this does not apply to multi axis CNC machines...there you can rely on the kinematics of the machine to tell you where you are regardless of the orientation of the parts or the head relative to the table motions.
On really big machines with really big parts it's obviously more efficient to tilt the head...on small ones it's probably a crap shoot as to which is better, but the point is, you don't have to care in the same way as you do on a manual.

So, depending on what the OP wants to build, and depending on the toys he's got your strategy may or may not work well.
It's a good thought though.

Cheers

Marcus
www.implant-mechanix.com
www.vancouverwireedm.com
 
Quick update:
The tilting table worked wonderfully. First off I will acknowledge the criticisms of such a tilt milling table over say a large sine plate or creating a custom fixture or propping up the part to the correct angle with wedges. There was quite a bit of fiddling and set up time but my part was about 12" X 27" long with 3 large counter bored holes 10 deg off axis from the rest of the part features. and this table worked excellent.

1. I cleaned up the tilt table. Set it to 0 deg. Flipped it upside down and milled the bottom flat. This eliminated any high spots and made base parallel to table top.
2. Also swept in the table square to the mill axis. Then milled some flat spots on the side of the base. This gives me quick way to rough in square when mounting the table. As my mill has a fixture plate with many holes that take bolts and dowel pins set square to the milling axis.
3. Properly mount tilt table on mil. Verifying and tapping in alignment of X and Y axis (Mostly Y axis). Also sweeping indicator on the top of the tilt table to see any miss alignment or high spots. ( I saw none or with in a couple of .0001" s). If I did see variation, I would mill table top flat as well.

Now that I have done steps 1 - 3 I should never need to do them again except for indicating alignment much like mounting a vice. It is quick enough.

4. tilt table to desired angle using etched scale on the front.
5. put sine bar stacked to desired angle on tilt table. Opposing the tilt table angle. This will make sine bar parallel to the original milling table and milling head. Making sure that the sine bar is also in line with the X axis to avoid any error. Sweeping indicator on top of sine bar and tapping in until indicator has no deviation.
6. Double check step 5.
7. Mount part with basic mill table toe clamps. sweep with indicator to align part to mill axis as well.
8. figure a good spot on part to touch off and establish XYZ Work offset (preferably on datums of the drawing if I can.)
9. run the program going slow with hand on the stop button. Worked perfectly.

So a lot of messing around. If it were a smaller part I could do all of the same in a vice with angle blocks or sine bar. but in this case it was way too big.

I am considering boring some holes in the tilt table to give me a good reference to align sine bar and part with dowel pins or something.

Another added benefit is that if my angle is slightly off. (which it is not) and I had other components that needed to mate using this same angle. (which I did.). I simply leave the tilt table at the same angle and they will match regardless the error. Although I did double check with sine bar before doing other component, just for sanity that nothing moved on me.

Wish I could show picture of the assembly. It is odd. imagine a large flat plate with 10 angle counter bores and some regular counter bores. Large straight stand off looking things go into the angled counter bores. and an odd block with angled pins milled into it go into the straight counter bores. essentially making the entire plate tilt. All of the angles need to match for the plate to sit securely on the other components.
 








 
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