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Joinery details of a wood shop

JoinerCP

Aluminum
Joined
May 12, 2015
Location
Indiana
Starting a thread to show the ongoing evolution of a developing shop. My shops-to-date have been a sunporch, garage and now a pole-style building. None have been insulated or conditioned. I've piddled away at home projects and dealt with the unpleasant conditions and acquired machines hoping "one day I'll really work on projects". This pole building was built by my grandfather over 20 years ago. It served as tractor/mower/implement/overflow building and junk piled up in the back half. When my family and I moved back to the area, I immediately set to cleaning out the 'storage space' so I could set-up a shop.

My grandfather had one of his brothers run a couple lines from a different building (an old hog barn) so they could have some lights and receptacles. That wasn't going to suffice for my plans, so we undid that electric and had it turned off before leveling half of the old hog barn due to dilapidation. We had the electric company run 400A service with 200A for this building and 200 capped for future use. I ran some lights and outlets and hooked up an RPC so I could power some of my equipment while I worked on side projects.

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Water would occasionally show up after big rains/storms and it was obviously running down the sidewalls before pooling in a couple areas. We believe the plastic was added to the building after-the-fact due to condensation issues from the metal roof. There is no underlayment under the metal. Their is a 1/4" foam "insulation" sandwiched between the metal roof and purlins. The plastic is stapled to the other side of the purlins. Some people have been generous enough to help me sort this out but I believe the plastic is the root cause of water down the walls. The roof terminates with a clear plastic "skylight" ridge which could also be the source of water intrusion. We're having a metal cap installed to replace it.

I'm slowly removing the OSB and plastic from between the bays and framing in walls for insulation.
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This was the worst of the rotted areas.
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Avoiding the electrical bay until the last step, after I have everything else done and we're ready to put up finished wall so the panel can be re-attached immediately.
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Running list of shop projects (not necessarily in order). I'm going to continually edit this with strike-through text to show what has been completed and add to it:
  • Finish framing the shop space. This includes 4 more bays & a partition wall with space for a door
  • Watch for water and determine if a new roof, with proper underlayment is required to stop moisture ingress
  • Insulate all walls
  • Install flooring
  • Install ceiling with moisture barrier and blow in insulation
  • Run electric/rewire lights
  • Build windows and install for improved natural lighting
  • Build carriage doors
  • Build partition door

Due to the weight of my machines, I need to build a floor capable of supporting 4k lbs. I'm thinking of putting down 6 mil plastic, laying 2x4 PT sleepers face down, 12" -16" OC, with insulation sandwiched between. Then adding 2x10-12" SYP boards on top. . I know these boards will shrink and gaps will grow so I'm considering buying 10-12" wide, 12-16' long and taking to a kiln to dry for me (limitation being length of board the kiln can dry). Then joint the edges and face nail. I'll also have a lot of cut down OSB recovered from the walls that could go underneath.

The floors have a slope to drain. To combat this and get level floors, I can shim (PITA) or use some kind of leveling agent after plugging the drain. I'm not sure how expensive or robust that is but I'd appreciate any suggestions.
 

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After hooking up the machines, I made a workbench to see how I liked it. (this was a couple years ago). Nothing terribly impressive but solid.

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The last couple weeks have been a continuation of tearing down plastic, shuffling lots of stuff, trying not to trip over the stuff I previously moved and battling the anxiety that I'll never find anything ever again.

Moving a stack of lumber with a lot of it 8/4 and 8+ feet long is not what I would call an enjoyable activity but it was completed.

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Looking good! Pole sheds are kind of a pain in the ass to deal with, but having a nice work space makes it worthwhile.
Ahh, tell me about it! Since I'm doing the work by myself, everything takes a long time. You start to find little ways to speed up but usually around the time you are finished with that task and redirecting to the next one, where there is an entire new learning curve ahead.

When you're framing in place a stick at a time, and those sticks are 12', and the majority of your space is crammed to the gills, it's easy to get overwhelmed. But piece by piece, it goes together.

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You can see my little system for helping keep boards in place while nailing the first few studs.

Starting to frame in a new, expanded window.

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I am glad to see you have that Milwaukee framing nailer. It's a workout for the arms and shoulders, but damn it is sweet.

I have a used up pole shed that came with my farm. Posts were rotten and it hadn't been taken care of for 20 years. I built a building within a building. Stick framed a metal shop and a wood shop in an L shape. Fully finished radiant heat, and mini splits for heating and air conditioning. Lots of power, internet, full bathroom, etc. And then the remainder of the space under the roof is nice heavy concrete with a mechanics pit. But just has the somewhat leaky worn out pole shed over the stop. My plan is to at some point replace the pole shed shell with something nicer. I hired out the concrete, but did everything else myself. You are right, it takes forever.

Then at my business laser year I converted a mostly open 3200ft^2 machine storage shed to a fully finished shop to house our new laser cutter. That one I hired out the carpentry for. Poles and framing were in good condition. The carpenters did bookshelf (horizontal) framing. It finished up nicely. But it was 3 or 4 guys for a bit over a month.
 
@kb0thn - I think that framing nailer is the source of my developing elbow pain. That and all of the loading/unloading of boards needed for the project. I don't trust the workers at the box stores to select the lumber for me but by the end of the 25-30 stick runs, my standards begin to dip a bit. Found a couple that shouldn't have passed inspection.

We're almost to the phase of needing to move all of the equipment out in the front (tractors, mower, etc) so I can transfer all of my equipment over and begin working on the ceiling/lights. Strongly considering renting a manlift so I can efficiently get this phase done. Need to hang ceiling boards, add plastic and blow in insulation before running the lighting.
 
@kb0thn - I think that framing nailer is the source of my developing elbow pain. That and all of the loading/unloading of boards needed for the project. I don't trust the workers at the box stores to select the lumber for me but by the end of the 25-30 stick runs, my standards begin to dip a bit. Found a couple that shouldn't have passed inspection.
I'm in the same boat. On big projects we have the lumberyard send out full units and then we send back the garbage or use it as blocking. For the small stuff I spend too much time at menards picking it out stick by stick. My strategy on that is to ask the employee nicely to bring down a unit (preferably an unopened one that hasn't been picked through) and put it by the bed of my truck.

We're almost to the phase of needing to move all of the equipment out in the front (tractors, mower, etc) so I can transfer all of my equipment over and begin working on the ceiling/lights. Strongly considering renting a manlift so I can efficiently get this phase done. Need to hang ceiling boards, add plastic and blow in insulation before running the lighting.
If you can swing it, buy a scissor lift. My goto machines are Genie GS1930. $3500 to $4500 will get you a serviceable modern machine if you watch Facebook marketplace for a few weeks. You can turn around and sell it for the price. But once you have one, you'll never want to sell it. I've got two of those genie units. They fit through a door and you can easily work on 20' ceiling. The turn tightly. And you can lift them with a forklift or drive them onto a small trailer.
 
I'm in the same boat. On big projects we have the lumberyard send out full units and then we send back the garbage or use it as blocking. For the small stuff I spend too much time at menards picking it out stick by stick. My strategy on that is to ask the employee nicely to bring down a unit (preferably an unopened one that hasn't been picked through) and put it by the bed of my truck.


If you can swing it, buy a scissor lift. My goto machines are Genie GS1930. $3500 to $4500 will get you a serviceable modern machine if you watch Facebook marketplace for a few weeks. You can turn around and sell it for the price. But once you have one, you'll never want to sell it. I've got two of those genie units. They fit through a door and you can easily work on 20' ceiling. The turn tightly. And you can lift them with a forklift or drive them onto a small trailer.
I can't swing it for just this job. There's a guy near me renting one out for ~$300/week and I can't beat that no matter how much I extrapolate out for future work. It'd be great to have one around when needed but I'd far rather put my money in machines I use everyday or almost everyday.

I'd also like a skid steer on tracks, a sawmill, kilns and a dedicated lumber storage space but those aren't in the budget right now either ;) Perhaps one day
 








 
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