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Laying a Hurco VM1 on it's back?

Spyderbreath

Plastic
Joined
Dec 19, 2023
Looking at a used VM1 and I figure it will fit through my garage door once it is laid on it's back. (6' 8" clearance). My question to those that have one, How much damage would this do to the machine or is it even possible to lay one over? I would much rather have a "real" VMC than one of those hobby machines / bench mill conversions, but the garage door height is a killer. I don't think one could even pull the spindle and head off and fit it through.

Any thoughts?
 
Sorry, Went to take a look but all hurco's site tried to do was jam a bunch of stupid worthless crap down my throat, so I left before I could even see how the thing was built.

Fuck them. Fuck ALL of them with their half-wit worthless garbage websites and NO, hurco losers, I have no interest in your scuzzy time payment plan. I can't even see what your fucking machine looks like, so eat shit and die, brainless fools.
 
Not sure it would do any damage to tip it over but it’d be a heckuva alot easier to just remove the header (supporting the roof) and increase the height of the opening instead.
 
Or, if vinyl siding on the side of the garage. Unsnap a piece of siding and take it all off. Remove a couple of studs and move it in from the side. Put it all back or trim out for a new door or removable panel.
 
No. There is no way you can put that machine "on its back" safely. There is nothing in the cabinet designed to support the weight of the casting, the table or anything else. If it can't be disassembled enough to get it through the door, it's not happening. If it has the side mount tool changer, it's probably not going to happen at all.
 
Thanks for all the input. Unfortunately structural mods are not in the cards as it is not my house. Would of been a done deal if it were, hence the question of laying it on it's back. It looks like I could just slide a Syil X7 in but really not interested in taking on debt with no certainty of any work that would come close to making just the payments.
 
No. There is no way you can put that machine "on its back" safely. There is nothing in the cabinet designed to support the weight of the casting, the table or anything else. If it can't be disassembled enough to get it through the door, it's not happening. If it has the side mount tool changer, it's probably not going to happen at all.
That's what I was afraid of, and yes, the 3 machines I have been looking at, they all have the side changer.
 
Thanks for all the input. Unfortunately structural mods are not in the cards as it is not my house. Would of been a done deal if it were, hence the question of laying it on it's back. It looks like I could just slide a Syil X7 in but really not interested in taking on debt with no certainty of any work that would come close to making just the payments.
You really should buy a house first any way.
 
For future reference: a Haas VF1 or VF2 will fit under a 7 foot garage header if:
  • It has the umbrella tool changer
  • Remove the Z axis motor (four screws and two connectors)
  • May need to remove the screws to the regen resistor
  • Remove the screws for the spindle cable guide and lay it on its side
After that, it needs a hole cut in the ceiling to clear the cable track and top of the spindle at full height. So plan to put the machine where those fit between the rafters.
 
For future reference: a Haas VF1 or VF2 will fit under a 7 foot garage header if:
  • It has the umbrella tool changer
  • Remove the Z axis motor (four screws and two connectors)
  • May need to remove the screws to the regen resistor
  • Remove the screws for the spindle cable guide and lay it on its side
After that, it needs a hole cut in the ceiling to clear the cable track and top of the spindle at full height. So plan to put the machine where those fit between the rafters.
The cable track and top of the spindle end up more than 10 feet? Inside has a 10 foot ceiling. Thanks for the info on the Hass.
 
What moron built a garage with a 10' lid and put a 6'8" door on it, WTF??
The guy was a cheap bast... re um. individual. The shortcuts in the construction of this place leave me shaking my head. Most likely didn't want to spend the money for any more door panels than necessary to get a car through.
 
My garage header was less than 6'8" and I stuffed in a DN DEM4000 standing up. I paid a handyman to pull the siding, cut the header, and put everything back. His price was a small fraction of the investment in the machine, so well worth it in my eyes.
 
What percentage of home buyers do you think needs a door higher than 6'8". I would think .00001% or so.
My garage has a door opening about that height. Loose a couple of inches for the door, and I can't even fit a F-150 into it. Course when my house was built a F-100 was alot shorter, and I doubt many people in suburbia owned them let alone wanted to park them inside.
 








 
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