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Leadwell lathe

cuttergrinder

Hot Rolled
Joined
Mar 16, 2007
Location
Salem,Ohio
Here is another question about our Leadwell lathe. Not sure if this is an issue or maybe I have the tailstock pressure too high. When I leave a shaft in it overnight and turn it on in the morning. The tailstock will move back about an inch when the hydraulics come on. It seems like it gets pressure to the ram before it gets enough pressure to the tailstock clamp. Not too big of an issue with small shafts but we are getting ready to run some cable drums that are 13' long and weigh 5,600 lbs. Could be an issue if the tailstock clamp doesnt hold the heavy weight.
 
Here is another question about our Leadwell lathe. Not sure if this is an issue or maybe I have the tailstock pressure too high. When I leave a shaft in it overnight and turn it on in the morning. The tailstock will move back about an inch when the hydraulics come on. It seems like it gets pressure to the ram before it gets enough pressure to the tailstock clamp. Not too big of an issue with small shafts but we are getting ready to run some cable drums that are 13' long and weigh 5,600 lbs. Could be an issue if the tailstock clamp doesnt hold the heavy weight.
Our Victor lathes behave the same way and it has always concerned me, but in practice nothing has ever fallen out. It's because they are hydraulically clamped, and the pressure comes on the quill and the clamps at the same time.

Out of caution, I have sometimes left heavy parts semi-suspended from the overhead crane if leaving them overnight, or put the steady under them.
 
Our Victor lathes behave the same way and it has always concerned me, but in practice nothing has ever fallen out. It's because they are hydraulically clamped, and the pressure comes on the quill and the clamps at the same time.

Out of caution, I have sometimes left heavy parts semi-suspended from the overhead crane if leaving them overnight, or put the steady under them.
This lathe has a programmable tailstock and it pins the cross slide to the tailstock to move it. One problem is when the tailstock slides it looses is position and then the control doesn't know where to pick it up the next time. It stores this as offset G58. So then you have to manually reset it. Also there is only about a 1 1/2" window on the ram position that the machine will run in. So if the tailstock moves too far, you have to move it back or it won't run.
 
Here is another question about our Leadwell lathe. Not sure if this is an issue or maybe I have the tailstock pressure too high. When I leave a shaft in it overnight and turn it on in the morning. The tailstock will move back about an inch when the hydraulics come on. It seems like it gets pressure to the ram before it gets enough pressure to the tailstock clamp. Not too big of an issue with small shafts but we are getting ready to run some cable drums that are 13' long and weigh 5,600 lbs. Could be an issue if the tailstock clamp doesnt hold the heavy weight.
Leave the machine on, turn the control off. This keeps the hydraulics on.
 
Dad used to have a hoist with some nylon straps under the part at night, and would pull the tailstock back a little. This way, the weight is on the chuck jaws and straps, rather than localized on the center.
 
Leave the machine on, turn the control off. This keeps the hydraulics on.
Don't know about OP's Leadwell, but this is not true of all machines, maybe even most machines nowadays.
This lathe has a programmable tailstock and it pins the cross slide to the tailstock to move it. One problem is when the tailstock slides it looses is position and then the control doesn't know where to pick it up the next time. It stores this as offset G58. So then you have to manually reset it. Also there is only about a 1 1/2" window on the ram position that the machine will run in. So if the tailstock moves too far, you have to move it back or it won't run.
That certainly sounds like a nuisance. The Victor uses physical switches to pick up the tailstock and I had always intended to change it to location based pickup as the switches are quite exposed and tend to get damaged by chips. Might have to rethink that now...
 
We are making a large steafy rest because the steady rest on this machine will only open to 12" . These tubes are 24" diameter. That will make it much safer but I will still have to deal with the tailstock wanting to move back at startup. I may make some kind of mechanical stock to prevent this. I will probably hang it from the crane at night.
 
Normally we run these cable drums in the manual machines but this has a lead on the grooves that the manuals won't cut. I could make a gear for manual to make it cut the right lead but the only lathe we have long enough is a monarch NN and it has no rapid on the carriage. We have 4 drums to cut so would be quite a workout cranking the carrige back hundreds of times. These grooves are 1" wide and 1/2" deep
 
Don't know about OP's Leadwell, but this is not true of all machines, maybe even most machines nowadays.
That is true, not all machines are like this.
Another fix could be using a bottle jack and some 4x4's to support the part at the tailstock end.
 
You can't adjust the quill travel stops?
You can but there is a rod that moves in and out with the ram. This rod has a head at the end about 1 1/2 long that triggers a proximity switch. You can adust the location of the proximity switch but you can't adjust how much stroke triggers the switch.
 
I have to ask.
Just what does it cost to leave the whole she-bang powered up over night.
Has anyone checked that cost vs a possible oops or the time needed to restart in the morning?
I know on some of my much smaller stuff the time costs to rezero and startup is more than what I eat in electricity at idle overnight.
Basically I never turn the machines off unless they will be not used for a week or more.
No zero returns, no nothing. Walk up, push the green button, make parts.
Since my controls run under windows this does have one drawback that bit me this Monday.
4 axis surface grinder. Other than power outages it has never been turned off since 2001. (01 on a K6 under NT, that is not a typo)
Stalled a bit and the kid said "I think we need a reboot".
Me "NO, the software has no memory leaks, something else is wrong. These machine never, ever need a reboot. That is not a fix."
Hard drive went south. NT4 a bit fussy about that since she likes to talk a lot. That pissed me off but things get old I guess.

Why do I do this?
Well I saw a big 80,000 person place decide to cut power during Christmas break to save pennies.
Reboot. restart, how hard can it be? Took over two months to get it all back into production.
Meanwhile backlog of engines and transmission and the huge expedited shipping costs to assembly.
Often is the tendency to shave pennies and waste dollars. One needs know the all the costs involved.

Power up the pump and some things will fill faster than others. This is not a $100 part.
Darn thing is making a part and knows what is where at shift end in the middle of doing work.
DO NOT turn it off. You are just simply asking for trouble.
Do you know that a new zero return is +/- one count of the last and the why?

Pumps take little or a lot of power depend on design. At idle most cncs do not draw much as it is not doing any work. Measure the electric used.
 
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I have to ask.
Just what does it cost to leave the whole she-bang powered up over night.
Has anyone checked that cost vs a possible oops or the time needed to restart in the morning?
I know on some of my much smaller stuff the time costs to rezero and startup is more than what I eat in electricity at idle overnight.
Basically I never turn the machines off unless they will be not used for a week or more.
No zero returns, no nothing. Walk up, push the green button, make parts.
Since my controls run under windows this does have one drawback that bit me this Monday.
4 axis surface grinder. Other than power outages it has never been turned off since 2001. (01 on a K6 under NT, that is not a typo)
Hard drive went south. That pissed me off but things get old I guess.

Why do I do this?
Well I saw a big 80,000 person place decide to cut power during Christmas break to save pennies.
Reboot. restart, how hard can it be? Took over two months to get it all back into production.
Meanwhile backlog of engines and transmission and the huge expedited shipping costs to assembly.
Often is the tendency to shave pennies and waste dollars. One needs know the all the costs involved.

Power up the pump and some things will fill faster than others. This is not a $100 part.
I agree but sometimes my boss trips over dollars trying to pick up pennies
 
One drawback to leaving it on is this thing uses a ton of lube oil. I realize its still not a lot of money but it tends to collect in the coolant. I suppose if you left it on all the time it would use 3 gals of lube oil in a week.
 








 
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