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lifting with a pair of fork lifts

tomjelly

Stainless
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Location
GA
So I'm almost done with renovating these two Clark 10K lifts I got, pictures soon to follow. Both are derated to around 8350 because of the distance the thickness of the side shift units move the load center out. I was wondering what the theoretical max lift for these working in tandem would be as in the drawing, with 102" load beams between the forks, or lifting the same load from overhead with a spreader beam, with straps or chains (straps would be as close to the side shift backing plates as practical, maybe 6" lc. Any reason this would NOT theoretically be 20,000 lbs? (of course the truck would need to pull out from under the lifted load, and the load would need to be level when lowering or lifting)
 

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The closer that your lift point is to the heel of the fork, the higher your capacity.


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox


More detail:

If you have your forks flat to slightly tipped down, so that your main contract point with the unit is closer to the mast - the better.

If you have them tipped back, you will both be sporting rear wheelies until your forks level out.

This is why it is SO helpfull to have a competent spotter on the way down!
You see it all the time [on youtube] where one fork truck is all comming up in the rear, but he won't let the mast down, and the other guy (usually larger truck) is letting it down slowly and has no clue what's going on _ on the other side, and then the load is spilled.

If the person with the video cam in their hands would'a put that thing down and had some input, maybe the load wouldn't'a been lost! Even if that means that someone that understands what's going on is the spotter, and the greenhand is on the truck following directions.


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
If the pallet could support the compressive load and you had the forklifts chained together... (and you weren't moving the lifts)

173840309.png
 
Just a note, it's my understanding that a spotter is a requirement when lifting with two forklifts.


Who or what is the requiring party/feature?


I have Shirley done this successfully w/o a spotter.
Don't recall ever losing one yet?

I could actually doo it myself as well, just take longer.


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
Can't imagine it being OK with OSHA at all?
They don't seem to like it when you git off the couch...


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
 
A forklift can handle absurd loads near the mast. It really comes down to the hydraulic pressure and failure point of the mast chains at that point.

I accidently lifted 1/2 of my 42K lb boring mill with a 4K lb Hyster. I was just trying to put some weight on the tires for traction to push it on the skates. Picked the big girl right up!
 
Certainly doable. In rigging terms using two machines to lift one object puts the operation into the “critical lift” category.
 
In the right situation and 2 operators that know what they are doing, both of those lifts could probably do 30k plus, if your hydraulics are up to it. With proper positioning, you can put the load right on the heel of the forks.
 
Who or what is the requiring party/feature?


I have Shirley done this successfully w/o a spotter.
Don't recall ever losing one yet?

I could actually doo it myself as well, just take longer.


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Think Snow Eh!
Ox
When moving large loads in our warehouse, I have lifted with 2 lifts by myself before in a pinch. Also move stuff, just put one lift in neutral and push of pull with the other.
 
Lovely. Now that I can unload stuff that heavy it means I have an excuse to BUY stuff that heavy. Oh no...
 
Use rectangular tubing as fork extensions where forks can be inserted from both ends, this will reduce chances of a forklift tipping.
THIS^^^

I even had my steel supplier loan me some rec tubes when I had to move a couple CNCs.

If you ever plan to move more machines one of the best, if not the best, investments you can make is a low profile toe jack. I can't tell you how valuable this tool is for rigging.
 
Just a note, it's my understanding that a spotter is a requirement when lifting with two forklifts.
Absolutely! And more than one is even wiser.
Some years ago I witnessed such a dual lift at a local forklift dealer. They used two 15,000 pound lift trucks to raise a wide, heavy machine off of a trailer where the deck was so rotted they deemed it unsafe to unload by normal methods. The number one spotter who was their most experienced man directed the lift while 3 other employees watched from other angles. The additional spotters proved a wise choice as one of them spotted shifted cribbing that the man standing behind the trailer couldn't see.

Then the driver pulled the trailer out from underneath and everyone breathed a sigh of relief after the machine was safely lowered to the ground.
 








 
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