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Long shank floating reamer with guide- How to use it?

xavier2089

Plastic
Joined
Nov 29, 2016
Hi all,
I'm wondering how you're actually meant to use this tool. I just got a picture of two of them off of the internet and attached it (I have one that I acquired from a bunch of old tools).
Obviously there is a cutting tool that can be adjusted and set but what are you meant to do after setting the cutting tool? It seems more like a single point boring tool than a "reamer"?
My guess would be that the sliding tapered sleeve is used for locating the hole to be reamed underneath a through hole.
What are the results like compared to a standard reamer?
Thanks in advanced for the info!
 

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Since nobody else responded, I'll guess at it.

This looks more like a single point boring bar for a line boring style machine. I doubt the description of them as a reamer, at least in the common sense of the term.

In the Technical sense, anything designed to make an already existing hole larger, could be considered a reamer.
 
Could be for electric motor/ generator bushings when they used them. Use the end bell and taper sleeve to lineup the opposite bushing then flip the reamer to do the other one. Although the cutter looks more like a boreing tool. I have a set of long adjustable expansion reamers with the taper sleeves like that except mine have long multi flute helical blades to do the reaming.
 
Thanks for the replies all.
I'll just go with some sort of line boring tool, which, as hvnlymachining pointed out, can still technically be classified as a reamer. Personally, I'd call a reamer a finishing tool that follows the existing axis of a bore by self centering and that isn't designed to correct locational dimensions (just diameter). I think you might be right michiganbuck in guessing that it's a field tool. Another guy elsewhere said that it looks like a kingpin reamer, which it does. I'm guessing 50's era or earlier.
Maybe it is off a machine hvnlymachining, as the single point tool would need support at the driven square end to prevent the tool from deflecting majorly during the cut. Unless it's missing some sort of bushing device on the driven end. Maybe the end opposite to the square drive is of set diameter and follows a specified drilled hole size, which keeps the cutter aligned. You'd only get one shot at cutting to size that way though.
The mystery remains a mystery.
 
I made and used lots of tools like that for boring truck axles .....the drive end is held in a drill spindle ,with a pilot bushing for the other end ..........the drill has a power feed ,and the finish left by the boring bar is quite satisfactory to install bushes in the axle end ............the process of bushing axle ends is quite illegal here for many years,but hey ..".iffn youse as dont tell them sho nuff I wont.."
 
I made and used lots of tools like that for boring truck axles .....the drive end is held in a drill spindle ,with a pilot bushing for the other end ..........the drill has a power feed ,and the finish left by the boring bar is quite satisfactory to install bushes in the axle end ............the process of bushing axle ends is quite illegal here for many years,but hey ..".iffn youse as dont tell them sho nuff I wont.."
There you have it... Maybe this type of specific tool was more of an Australian made thing than elsewhere.
 








 
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