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Looking for a 14"-16" South Bend Compound

M.B. Naegle

Diamond
Joined
Feb 7, 2011
Location
Conroe, TX USA
So as the title reads, I'm looking for a South Bend Compound, but lets back up as it's a little less straight forward than that.

I have a 1910's-1920's Flather lathe that the compound was replaced with a riser and turret style tool post. Flather is like the great step-daddy of South Bend as they developed a number of designs that South Bend adopted, such as their single tumbler quick change gear box. It's highly unlikely I'll find a true Flather compound, so I'm thinking a South Bend would make a good fit if it's the right size and can be easily adapted

The Flather is a 15" swing. I found a picture online of a 16" South Bend compound and the crank and dial look very similar to the Flather's cross feed. The cross slide has the typical pilot hole in the center and a circular T-bolt slot. Maximum diameter of the bottom of the compound would be 7", the pilot would be 1 5/8", and the T bolts are 1/2" on a 5 1/2" center. Does that sound like something a South Bend would fit or could be adapted to? Anyone parting something out?

I'd consider other lathe compounds too, provided they don't stick out like a sore thumb and don't de-rate the lathe's capacity. Flather had a reputation for hearty castings capable of utilizing carbide when it was introduced. I plan to keep the riser and turret post handy, but want to have the compound's utility as well. More on the Flather here.





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That style is more reminiscent of Monarch's compounds. With pilot, tee bolts.

Not sure pre 1940's, but 1940's thru 1970's South Bends the male side of pilot is not just a circle, its a dove tail all the way around. There are two set screws in cross slide that tighten to that dove tail when you set the degrees of compound.

No tee bolts.

I have a few Monarch's i can check the dimensions, but it may take me a few days to get back with you on that.
 
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A Monarch 12ckk is close. 7.25" on outer circle. 5.75" on tee bolt spread. Pilot is 1.25".

I know a 10ee is smaller. Pretty sure a 16" series 61 is bigger, but I'll see it in a few days.

Guessing a 12" to 14" monarch gear head lathe will be close, with some little mods needed.
 
So as the title reads, I'm looking for a South Bend Compound, but lets back up as it's a little less straight forward than that.

I have a 1910's-1920's Flather lathe that the compound was replaced with a riser and turret style tool post. Flather is like the great step-daddy of South Bend as they developed a number of designs that South Bend adopted, such as their single tumbler quick change gear box. It's highly unlikely I'll find a true Flather compound, so I'm thinking a South Bend would make a good fit if it's the right size and can be easily adapted

The Flather is a 15" swing. I found a picture online of a 16" South Bend compound and the crank and dial look very similar to the Flather's cross feed. The cross slide has the typical pilot hole in the center and a circular T-bolt slot. Maximum diameter of the bottom of the compound would be 7", the pilot would be 1 5/8", and the T bolts are 1/2" on a 5 1/2" center. Does that sound like something a South Bend would fit or could be adapted to? Anyone parting something out?

I'd consider other lathe compounds too, provided they don't stick out like a sore thumb and don't de-rate the lathe's capacity. Flather had a reputation for hearty castings capable of utilizing carbide when it was introduced. I plan to keep the riser and turret post handy, but want to have the compound's utility as well. More on the Flather here.





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I have a old style South Bend 16” compound, but the T-bolt holes are only 4 3/4” apart
Ted
 
OK I bought a compound. Didn't end up being a South Bend but it should work. The guy who had it said it was from a Lodge and Shipley, but no idea what size, model, or age. It's a little "advanced" with the mitered ball crank and dial, but I think it will look at home with some fastener substitution and matching paint. It's big and wide so it matches the machines power potential I think, but it's also low profile and won't rob any tool height. Most importantly, it will fit with little modification. I need to turn down the pilot some, and the t-bolt holes need to be enlarged and their position shifted slightly. The diameter of the base is the same as the width of the cross slide, which is good too.
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