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Machine Shop Supervisor, 2nd Shift

Haha I made net $400 this year, what you talkin about? :D
Really.. Live on $400 per year?
You talk bullshit in this world. Maybe this is after your paychecks? My shop makes nothing. It is all taken out in pay.
Done the $30 per hour supervisor in auto thing recently. Full bennies on top. 50+ hour weeks and not so bad a deal.
Steady check, overtime if you want, doubles on Sundays, good health care, 401 match.
The wife thinks I am crazy nuts for going back outside and she might be right.
I would not be afraid to take this job offer or think it underpaid.
You all can piss and moan and say how it should pay more . The offer is the offer and it seems respectable to me.
 
The job the op posted is only paying 54-62/yr, nowhere even close to 200k.
$30 per hour plus overtime puts you in the 80+ range.
Did it and I have the pay stubs.
The 200K is what all others here think this a manager/supervisor/owner should make. I do not think they are actually cashing these checks.
Many dream or say the pay is too low for me.
Deal is one has to work and this job is not bad as a offer.
But ... any job offer here brings out so many saying "That is not enough".
So be it and happy for those in over $200k per year.
 
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$30 per hour plus overtime puts you in the 80+ range.
I have the pay stubs.
The 200K is what all others here think this a manager/supervisor should make. I do not think they are actually cashing these checks.
Supervisors and managers usually fall into salaried categories and aren't eligible for overtime but, expected to eat, sleep and breathe for the company. It would have to be an exceptionally loaded manager to be worth more than $150K but, $120-150K for what that job description is asking for shouldn't be out of the question.

Simple measure: can my boss (not the owner) afford a basic new pickup truck and 1,800 SF house on this salary? If not, it's not enough. If the manager can't afford the new truck, the employees won't even be able to scrape by with a fifteen year old used truck and 1,000 SF house.
 
Really.. Live on $400 per year?
You talk bullshit in this world. Maybe this is after your paychecks? My shop makes nothing. It is all taken out in pay.
Done the $30 per hour supervisor in auto thing recently. Full bennies on top. 50+ hour weeks and not so bad a deal.
Steady check, overtime if you want, doubles on Sundays, good health care, 401 match.
The wife thinks I am crazy nuts for going back outside and she might be right.
I would not be afraid to take this job offer or think it underpaid.
You all can piss and moan and say how it should pay more . The offer is the offer and it seems respectable to me.
Oops typo smart ass, I meant $400k, and yes I did, paid off a house and 2 new machines.
 
This thread - combined with the data in donkey hotkey's thread - would actually be a great topic for one of @IanSandusky PM videos. I'm not being sarcastic either, it could be a helpful reference for companies struggling to get positions filled.
Great idea, thank you very much for the recommendation! This is actually something I have some fairly strong opinions on as well - I've touched on it in previous videos but I think it's always topical - especially with the apparent race to the bottom now not only coming from the purchasers but from the hiring staff as well.

Just for reference in terms of my pay grades - my skilled machinists (not even supervisors) on day shift are paid *significantly* more than this listing. If I was going to be bringing on someone for second shift with those qualifications and responsibilities, I would expect to pay much more for their trouble.
 
I will admit the pay range stated on this job is a bit perplexing. This employer has posted two other jobs on our site earlier this year with the following comp.

They had a "Machine Shop Manager" role posted with pay between $100K and $120K.

And they had a "CNC Programmer" role posted at $120k to $140K.

Quite a difference from the Machine Shop Supervisor outlined here.
 
Shop supervisor, shop manager, programmer, cnc machinist are all different jobs.
As a floor supervisor many people who worked under me made more than I did.
I never had a problem with this.
Here is where things get so screwed up.
You have a top notch, at the right hand of God machinist. He/She wants to make more money so the progression is into management or supervision for a raise.
Skills they do not have and a total waste of what they can do and they are stuffed into this role overnight with no training or mentor.
A year or two in and everyone gets unhappy. What was the best employee in the world now leaves in frustration.
I think I have seen this once or twice.
 
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Here is where things get so screwed up.
You have a top notch, at the right hand of God machinist. He/She wants to make more money so the progression is into management or supervision for a raise.
Skills they do not have and a total waste of what they can do and they are stuffed into this role overnight with no training or mentor.
A year or two in and everyone gets unhappy. What was the best employee in the world now leaves in frustration.
I think I have seen this once or twice.
Very true, this happened to me.

Don't mean to toot my own horn, but I was placed in a department where I learned the ins and outs quickly and did a good job. Also had a knack for doing data collection and analysis, navigating the QMS, and got along fairly well with others in the department.

So when they thought I was ready, offered me supervisor of the department. Of course I took it, as it paid more money and I had a vision for the direction of the department.

Unfortunately this changed the dynamic of my relationship with my coworkers. Where before I didn't have to worry about absences, scrapped parts, not completing required documentation, I was now responsible for doing so. There were definitely some times where I was a bit anal about it, but no matter what I did, I was met with resistance from some folks.

I enjoyed making chips, figuring out how to make the shitty parts run good, and getting covered in oil. Having guys scream in my face because because I had to hold them accountable for being late four out of five days a week, or because they had to plot dimensions on a chart, wasn't really my thing.
 
Here is where things get so screwed up.
You have a top notch, at the right hand of God machinist. He/She wants to make more money so the progression is into management or supervision for a raise.
Skills they do not have and a total waste of what they can do and they are stuffed into this role overnight with no training or mentor.
A year or two in and everyone gets unhappy. What was the best employee in the world now leaves in frustration.
I think I have seen this once or twice.
Think this is called the "Peter Principle"
 
Update on this job after speaking again with the employer.

They are targeting around $28 - $34/hour + OT for the role. Which has been updated on the site.
 
Still a job offer is not for the people who are above that wage rate. I know people who are dong well on that rate.
Food in the fridge, shoes for the kids, gas for the car beats getting your buddy to drive you to pickup a wealfare check.

  • Medical, dental, vision, and life insurance is a big plus in the job offer.
 
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"Advertising such a low pay scale with such high demands on this job listing could hurt their prospects of filling other positions as well - it makes them sound brutally out of touch. "

Honestly an excellent response - well thought out and will give the head-hunters pause. Kudos.

Was that the same mclaren F1 like the one mr. bean crased twice?

 
Just a reminder that there’s no “labour shortage”, that’s complete BS propagated by corpo bag-munchers.

There is however an endemic of businesses that will not pay a living wage.

There's a Labour shortage of competant workers.

Last place I worked 9 out of 10 hired for the shop (conventional/cnc/programming/inspection) didn't last the first week, most never made it to the end of the day. And these were guys typically with stellar resumes.
 
There's a Labour shortage of competant workers.

Last place I worked 9 out of 10 hired for the shop (conventional/cnc/programming/inspection) didn't last the first week, most never made it to the end of the day. And these were guys typically with stellar resumes.
If they're hiring people for a skilled position and 90% don't survive the week they have a woefully deficient interview/hiring process. Might be not knowing what questions to ask, describing the role wrong, are any number/combination of other things.

This is a bit like complaining about the shortage of skilled lawn guys. Plenty of people exist who can do that well, but most of them are getting paid more to do something else. Cheap, good, and available, pick two.
 
If they're hiring people for a skilled position and 90% don't survive the week they have a woefully deficient interview/hiring process. Might be not knowing what questions to ask, describing the role wrong, are any number/combination of other things.

They knew what they were doing.

The problem is that 90% of the people coming in oversold themselves. Their resume was almost a complete fabrication in respect to their skills. Most of the guys hired for the skilled CNC positions turned out to be operators only. ALL the CNC machinists were expected to be able to do their own setups, edit programs, setup single/double sine plates etc. For a lot of people hired in it was very evident they could load a vise and hit start and nothing else. Occasionally they would get somebody who would look trainable, but that was rare.

Because of insurance reasons, they couldn't give them a machining test, and previous employers are only allowed to acknowledge that xxx xxxx worked at that company. So they had to be hired before their capabilities were apparent.

They did eventually find away of weeding out a lot of CNC operators, they'd walk past the rack of sine plates, and the foreman would ask if the interviewee knew what they were. If they didn't, they were shown the exit real quick.

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Conventional machinists were generally better, and ussually in their 50's/60's. Young conventional machinists are so rare they never had any young applicants.

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And then there were the CNC programmers. Those applicants they did test. They had to do stuff in Mastercam. Manipulate geometry, write a toolpath. Sometimes that would be a part that required multiple tools, 2D/3D programming etc.
A lot of programmers were ok 2D, a lot couldn't do complex 3D programming.
If a programmer appeared to know ehat he was doing, but for instance had nvere programmed for a sine plate setup, they would teach them after being hired.

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I bet the majority of programmers/cnc machinists here couldn't do a sine plate setup if their life depended on it.

This is a bit like complaining about the shortage of skilled lawn guys. Plenty of people exist who can do that well, but most of them are getting paid more to do something else. Cheap, good, and available, pick two.

You probably haven't been reading the news. Everybody is complaining about a shortage of competant workers.

As too the last company, the hourly rate was comparable to local companies. not better but comparable.

The reason working there was attractive were the 5*12's Monday-Friday and 6's on Saturday. So guys in the shop were taking home some very impressive paychecks.

Now of course you or some other clever dick is going to ask about the work/life balance, working 66hours a week.
The guys loved the 66 hour weeks.
They bitched and moaned if the hours were cut during the rare occasions it was slow.
 
Referencing the post above, but not quoting to save space.
1. I maintain my point about hiring processes bit you let someone oversell themselves on their resume then you haven’t interviewed properly. When I hire an engineer I don’t just ask “Can you do stuff?” and take their word for it, I dig into the details. Those who can’t walk the walk fail when you start asking for specifics or demonstrations. You might not be able to let someone turn on a spindle, but they can describe the process, maybe do a setup on a manual machine, measure something, etc. Sounds like they found a sine bar test. Your insurance isn’t going to drop you if you hand an applicant a double sine table, stack of gage blocks, height gage, and ask them to set up on a granite table. That would weed operators out from those with experience. Use cheap gage blocks during the interview so they don’t damage your good set. An operator won’t know how to clean, wring, might not even know how to select the right ones. If they break your sine table it’s still cheaper than hiring them and having them break it anyways, while crashing a machine.
2. Applicants exist. I just spent almost a year hiring for a role. Sure there aren’t a ton of qualified applicants, but my employer is only paying median wage for the role, and that’s low given the COL increases. Had we been paying more than median wages in an expensive part of town there were several other qualified people I know who would have been interested. You can’t offer 2018 wages and expect to poach.
 








 
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