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Magnifier for tools with small dial

In use the magnification lens from a stereo microscope. I have this one but others are just as good.
Use something like this every time I use the lathe. I made a plastic cylinder that this gets inserted into.
Drop it and the plastic shroud takes the beating. Best tool in the place.

 
I mentioned the Hastings triplet. It is a classic design that consists of three glass elements cemented together. It is highly corrected so you don't have color fringes or bent lines or most other optical defects AND it is symmetrical so there is no difference if you look through either end. They come in a wide variety of powers from 3X up to 15X or perhaps even 20X. Mine are 7X, 10X, and 15X.
Hastings Triplets are indeed very good. But note well that not all triplets are Hastings triplets - anything containing three lenses qualifies as a triplet, and the Hastings triplet is the most expensive to make.
 
In use the magnification lens from a stereo microscope. I have this one but others are just as good.
Use something like this every time I use the lathe. I made a plastic cylinder that this gets inserted into.
Drop it and the plastic shroud takes the beating. Best tool in the place.

Just so I understand, this is the big lense from the bottom of the stereo microscope, not the eyepiece? Do you use it specifically for reading the cross feed dial or for looking at the cut on small parts? Any photos of the setup? Do you have extra light also?

I wish I knew more about optics. I do have a box of various lense and lense assemblies, I should dig it out and see if there is anything in there that works good on the dial. I think I want a lense that is small and close to the dial so it does not get in the way but leaves the image erect (not inverted) when viewed from about 24" away. Better lighting would be a plus.

I can appreciate that the best solution may end up being a USB camera that has a light and decent depth of field but it would be nice to find something lower tec that works.
 
Did a google search on this image, these are really inexpensive on ebay, less than $30US. Do they really work and not give you headaches? Or immediately fall apart?
I use mine 5 to 10 times per year, I've had it for 8 years. You have to get the inter-pupal spacing right or it will give you a headache. Max lathe time I've used it would be 45 to 60 mins continuous. Generally I use my glasses and the flip down 1.5x
 
I was at Home Depot today so I bought some of those Milwaukee safety glasses to try. They only had the 1.5X variety.

Almost useless for me...the regular part means I can't see anything, and the mag part means I can't see anything a little better. Plus they're very fussy as to distance....I need to be within an inch or so in depth for them to be in their best focus.
 
Haha, my old ass night driving in the rain, yeah bad news.
I did a little LSD back in my youth, now if I night drive in snow storms I get good ole flash backs.
ie. I get the ability to change perspective, So instead of going down the freeway at 75mph and driving through the snow.
my brain swaps the perspective, and it seems I am holding still, and the snow is coming at me at 75mph. NO BUENO!:eek:
With cataracts every light while night driving gives you a massive star burst. And at some point you loose depth perception. Basically looking through a fogged dirty window. Anyway, the LSD look was cool back then, and fun. Not so much now. I could not read anything on my dashboard without my reading glasses and very hard time reading email POs. But not now. Top shelf lenses inserted in both eyes. That lens allows me to see just about anything near and far and reading glasses needed for only very fine stuff. Downside to those lenses is circular refractions around lights at night. But those refractions are just circles around the light source and confined. Cataract had massive start burst at night that blocked out for too much and kept me (us) home at night.
If ya can, git it done.
And WTF are tools with small dials? My machines talk to me. Wish they would understand STFU.
 
Just so I understand, this is the big lense from the bottom of the stereo microscope, not the eyepiece? Do you use it specifically for reading the cross feed dial or for looking at the cut on small parts? Any photos of the setup? Do you have extra light also?

I wish I knew more about optics. I do have a box of various lense and lense assemblies, I should dig it out and see if there is anything in there that works good on the dial. I think I want a lense that is small and close to the dial so it does not get in the way but leaves the image erect (not inverted) when viewed from about 24" away. Better lighting would be a plus.

I can appreciate that the best solution may end up being a USB camera that has a light and decent depth of field but it would be nice to find something lower tec that works.
Just one of the two eyepieces. I have this one too but that price is too high.
I made black plastic covers for the ends. Test ones ability to make a nice sliding fit. And it comes off with a pop.


You can take one in your pocket when shopping at the grocery store. Helps me read small print like "contains a bio engineered food ingredient".
 
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My machines talk to me. Wish they would understand STFU.
Now there's a novel idea. OCR to speech so the dials tell you what the reading is. Just have a mike for feedback to tell the machine to STFU. Could be a problem when you stuff the size up and the machine says "I told you so"
 
Driving at night....I've noticed that in recent times it's developed that about 35% of all people drive with their hi beams on. All the time. Then, there are the retards who bought new Ford trucks, designed by retards, which have two headlights on on each side all the time,
 
And WTF are tools with small dials? My machines talk to me. Wish they would understand STFU.
LOL, I was not sure if I should of posted this in the general forum or the south bend or antique forum, Some of my tools are from the 1940s and the small dials are more common from that era.


Thanks, sometimes just having the right search term makes all the difference.

"Magnetic lense for vernier instruments"
"Magnifier For Universal Bevel Protractor"

I will see how this last one works on the curved dial surface. There needs to be enough depth of field so a reasonable portion of the curved dial surface is in focus. Also good eye relief so my head is not too close to rotating and sharp stuff. By the time I am done I think I should dedicate one entire toolbox drawer to magnifiers.
 








 
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